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    What is the actual difference between a Masters degree and a Postgraduate degree? How is the grading done on these types of degrees? Is it similar to undergraduate degree?


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    (Original post by Salmah Ox')
    What is the actual difference between a Masters degree and a Postgraduate degree? How is the grading done on these types of degrees? Is it similar to undergraduate degree?


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    In the UK, "postgraduate" usually refers to the level at which you study, rather than being a degree. Examples of postgraduate-level qualifications are:

    - Masters degree, which can include MSc, MA, MRes
    - Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), equal to one taught Masters term
    - Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), equal to two taught Masters terms
    - MPhil, which can either be a stand-alone qualification or the first part of a PhD

    Masters degrees are usually graded differently to undergrad degrees. Mine was Pass (50.0-59.9%), Merit (60.0-69.9%) and Distinction (70.0% and above). However many unis/courses only have Pass and Distinction and the thresholds can be different.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    In the UK, "postgraduate" usually refers to the level at which you study, rather than being a degree. Examples of postgraduate-level qualifications are:

    - Masters degree, which can include MSc, MA, MRes
    - Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), equal to one taught Masters term
    - Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), equal to two taught Masters terms
    - MPhil, which can either be a stand-alone qualification or the first part of a PhD

    Masters degrees are usually graded differently to undergrad degrees. Mine was Pass (50.0-59.9%), Merit (60.0-69.9%) and Distinction (70.0% and above). However many unis/courses only have Pass and Distinction and the thresholds can be different.
    Oh okay, I kind of understand lol.. another question I have is.. what is the best type of postgraduate qualification?
    E.g is PG Cert equal to a Masters?
    Which postgrad qualification is highest? Do they all equal same but just different titles? What does it mean one taught Masters term?


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    (Original post by Salmah Ox')
    Oh okay, I kind of understand lol.. another question I have is.. what is the best type of postgraduate qualification?
    E.g is PG Cert equal to a Masters?
    Which postgrad qualification is highest? Do they all equal same but just different titles? What does it mean one taught Masters term?


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    "One taught Masters term": A taught Masters generally consists of three terms of study. In the first two terms you take modules which are taught through lectures, supervised lab sessions, seminars etc, much as an undergrad degree would be. The third term is usually dedicated to your dissertation - a piece of independent research. For a PGCert you would just do one of the taught terms. For a PGDip, you would take both taught terms but you would not do the dissertation.

    Different unis have different systems, but generally:

    - A PGCert is equivalent to one-third of a Masters, so is lower than both a PGDip and a Masters.
    - A PGDip is equivalent to two-thirds of a Masters. It's lower than a Masters but higher than a PGCert.
    - At my uni an MPhil is viewed as a higher qualification than a Masters, but from conversations here in the past, apparently some unis can view it as equivalent to a Masters.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    "One taught Masters term": A taught Masters generally consists of three terms of study. In the first two terms you take modules which are taught through lectures, supervised lab sessions, seminars etc, much as an undergrad degree would be. The third term is usually dedicated to your dissertation - a piece of independent research. For a PGCert you would just do one of the taught terms. For a PGDip, you would take both taught terms but you would not do the dissertation.

    Different unis have different systems, but generally:

    - A PGCert is equivalent to one-third of a Masters, so is lower than both a PGDip and a Masters.
    - A PGDip is equivalent to two-thirds of a Masters. It's lower than a Masters but higher than a PGCert.
    - At my uni an MPhil is viewed as a higher qualification than a Masters, but from conversations here in the past, apparently some unis can view it as equivalent to a Masters.
    That's a lot clear now thank you for explaining. I'm currently studying a PG Cert in Professional Management and thinking of doing PG in Education.. what would I need to do to get Masters title?


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    (Original post by Salmah Ox')
    That's a lot clear now thank you for explaining. I'm currently studying a PG Cert in Professional Management and thinking of doing PG in Education.. what would I need to do to get Masters title?


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    To get a Masters degree, you would need to do all three terms (a full calender year) of a Masters degree course. You could ask your current uni whether it would be possible to continue after your PGCert to get a Masters in Professional Management - this would mean one more term of lectures, coursework etc, and a dissertation or independent research.

    It depends on what level your Education postgrad course is, and if lower than a Masters, whether that uni would permit you to do a full Masters year. If it is a PGCE, that is a different teaching qualification and it is not part of a Masters path.

    Every uni can set its own regs about whether - or how - those on PGCerts or PGDips can progress to a full Masters. You will have to ask either where you are, or where you're going next.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    To get a Masters degree, you would need to do all three terms (a full calender year) of a Masters degree course. You could ask your current uni whether it would be possible to continue after your PGCert to get a Masters in Professional Management - this would mean one more term of lectures, coursework etc, and a dissertation or independent research.

    It depends on what level your Education postgrad course is, and if lower than a Masters, whether that uni would permit you to do a full Masters year. If it is a PGCE, that is a different teaching qualification and it is not part of a Masters path.

    Every uni can set its own regs about whether - or how - those on PGCerts or PGDips can progress to a full Masters. You will have to ask either where you are, or where you're going next.
    Right.. do you think it would be possible if I do the PGCE and then do another term after to gain Masters in Education as well as the PGCE?


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    (Original post by Salmah Ox')
    Right.. do you think it would be possible if I do the PGCE and then do another term after to gain Masters in Education as well as the PGCE?


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    Not as far as I know. A PGCE is a stand-alone teaching qualification and is not a Masters-type course.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Not as far as I know. A PGCE is a stand-alone teaching qualification and is not a Masters-type course.
    Ohh ok. Thank you


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