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    Hey guys,

    Before I start with the requests I will give you a bit of a background on myself.

    I am 35 years old and currently teach BTEC Sport at an FE college in the North of Yorkshire. I have a degree in Sports Coaching and PE as well as numerous sporting qualifications to compliment this. I have recently applied to Atkins for one of their entry level apprenticeships at my local office...unfortunately I have been told that they feel I would be better suited to a higher/degree apprenticeship programme instead, but they have none to offer in the area at present.

    What I am wanting to ask is if there is anybody out there who has had a similar experience in retraining as an engineer and what they feel would be the best approach.

    I am currently thinking their are two avenues to look into; wait for an appropriate position to come up in my area offering the degree apprenticeship (however I do not have any formal A level qualifications as I completed my degree as a mature student) or enrol on a part time engineering degree and hope in 6 years when I qualify that there is a demand for a 41 year old engineer just starting out on their career.

    I feel that if I attain an engineering degree independently it will be harder to gain employment compared to being employed while developing the skills and knowledge.

    Thank you in advance for any help you are able to give.
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    A-levels in Mathematics, Physics, and maybe one other science subject are a route.

    An apprenticeship in Engineering is also one.

    Another option is an Engineering degree with a foundation year.

    There are also foundation degrees in Engineering, I think.

    Alternatively, you could try an Access to HE course and focus on modules relevant to Engineering, then pursue a regular Engineering degree.
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    A-levels in Mathematics, Physics, and maybe one other science subject are a route.

    An apprenticeship in Engineering is also one.
    Thank you for your reply but I am not sure you have tread the original post, I am 35 years old and not a school leaver.

    Thank you for the input though.
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    (Original post by MT82LFC)
    Thank you for your reply but I am not sure you have tread the original post, I am 35 years old and not a school leaver.

    Thank you for the input though.
    I did. I also edited the post since I thought of three other ways.
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    I did. I also edited the post since I thought of three other ways.
    Ah I see, I was too quick to post a reply

    I was thinking of doing a degree but wanted advice on what people thought would be the best idea in the long run.
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    (Original post by MT82LFC)
    Ah I see, I was too quick to post a reply

    I was thinking of doing a degree but wanted advice on what people thought would be the best idea in the long run.
    So was I

    Personally, I believe almost all of your option will take about the same amount of time.

    If you do Access to HE, it will take one year, then 3 years for your degree if full-time, or 5/6 if part-time. Total: 4-6/7 years.

    If you do an apprenticeship, it depends if you start at level 3 or 4 and if you do it full-time or part-time. If you start at level 3 and do that until you reach level 6 (degree level), it can take 4 year full-time and the part-time will probably add two-four years to that. If you start at level 4, it will take 3 years full-time, 6 or maybe 8(?) years part-time. Total: 3-6/8(?) years. Then again, the part-time duration may vary based on the university/college.

    If you do a degree with a foundation year, it can take 4 years full-time. Part-time varies but I think it is around 6 years? Total: 4-6 years.

    (Sorry if my calculations are a bit off.)

    Overall, no matter which route you take, it takes a similar amount of time, so take whichever route is more accesible to you.

    In the long run, all of these ways are feasible. Of course, university degrees seem to be preferred (whether they have a foundation year or if they start off as foundation degrees or not), but if you do not receive an offer for a university-level Engineering course due to not having any A-level or equivalents, there is no shame in doing a level 3 apprenticeship or Access to HE with focus on science modules.
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    (Original post by MT82LFC)
    Hey guys,

    Before I start with the requests I will give you a bit of a background on myself.

    I am 35 years old and currently teach BTEC Sport at an FE college in the North of Yorkshire. I have a degree in Sports Coaching and PE as well as numerous sporting qualifications to compliment this. I have recently applied to Atkins for one of their entry level apprenticeships at my local office...unfortunately I have been told that they feel I would be better suited to a higher/degree apprenticeship programme instead, but they have none to offer in the area at present.

    What I am wanting to ask is if there is anybody out there who has had a similar experience in retraining as an engineer and what they feel would be the best approach.

    I am currently thinking their are two avenues to look into; wait for an appropriate position to come up in my area offering the degree apprenticeship (however I do not have any formal A level qualifications as I completed my degree as a mature student) or enrol on a part time engineering degree and hope in 6 years when I qualify that there is a demand for a 41 year old engineer just starting out on their career.

    I feel that if I attain an engineering degree independently it will be harder to gain employment compared to being employed while developing the skills and knowledge.

    Thank you in advance for any help you are able to give.
    What is your degree in? The degree trumps any A-levels... but obviously engineering relies on maths so without a Maths A-level (or a science degree) you may struggle. Access to HE may be the route.
 
 
 
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