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    Hello to everyone

    I'm an EU student who is planning to study during one year in the UK. So, I would like to know useful vocabulary that I could use at the fish shop and the butcher shop.

    What's more, I would like to know if I should use the imperial or the metric system for shopping.

    Thank you for reading.
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    Imperial or Metric will do really. Everyone is pretty much well acquainted with both. What type of vocab do you want? What's the purpose, do you want to order food, or get different types of meat, or want dishes/food that are specifically British?
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    a few slang terms youll end up using:

    "Alright mate" (means hello, how are you?)

    "What you on about?" (what do you mean?)

    "One fish please" (when you go into a fish and chip shop, you order the fish items you want straight away so they are ready when you get to the front of the queue, so if you want two fish and chips, you say "two fish please mate"

    "scraps" are little pieces of cooked batter that you put in with the chips, if you want to try them, ask for "fish and chips with scraps" )theyre awesome, I love scraps Edit: try curry sauce with your fish and chips, or mushy peas

    Erm, at the butchers, it is really down to what you want, If you want bacon or something, just ask and say the weight or slices. Usually imperial and metric are both used. Butchers are dying out as well so you may end up shopping at the supermarket if you dont have one local.

    Erm, other slang you may hear is "cheers" (thank you) "now then" (more used in the north, means hi) and "Easy mate" (more used in cities and the south, means "alright mate"
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    (Original post by SonoLuma)
    a few slang terms youll end up using:

    "Alright mate" (means hello, how are you?)

    "What you on about?" (what do you mean?)

    "One fish please" (when you go into a fish and chip shop, you order the fish items you want straight away so they are ready when you get to the front of the queue, so if you want two fish and chips, you say "two fish please mate"

    "scraps" are little pieces of cooked batter that you put in with the chips, if you want to try them, ask for "fish and chips with scraps" )theyre awesome, I love scraps Edit: try curry sauce with your fish and chips, or mushy peas

    Erm, at the butchers, it is really down to what you want, If you want bacon or something, just ask and say the weight or slices. Usually imperial and metric are both used. Butchers are dying out as well so you may end up shopping at the supermarket if you dont have one local.

    Erm, other slang you may hear is "cheers" (thank you) "now then" (more used in the north, means hi) and "Easy mate" (more used in cities and the south, means "alright mate"
    This information is absolutely useful. Thank you!!
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    (Original post by gwaggy)
    Imperial or Metric will do really. Everyone is pretty much well acquainted with both. What type of vocab do you want? What's the purpose, do you want to order food, or get different types of meat, or want dishes/food that are specifically British?
    I want vocabulary for the different types of meat and fishes. Also some of the slang in order to be "less foreign". And It would be interesting to know the name of some dishes which are specifically British
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    (Original post by Alextox)
    I want vocabulary for the different types of meat and fishes. Also some of the slang in order to be "less foreign". And It would be interesting to know the name of some dishes which are specifically British
    To name a few...

    You have black pudding, tripe, offal, haggis, cumberland sausage as meat products. We also like our cod and salmon. As to British dishes, we have Cornish pasties, Yorkshire puddings, Shepherd's pie, toad-in-the-hole, bubble and squeak, etc. The main things are stuff like Roast Dinner and Fish and Chips.
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    (Original post by gwaggy)
    To name a few...

    You have black pudding, tripe, offal, haggis, cumberland sausage as meat products. We also like our cod and salmon. As to British dishes, we have Cornish pasties, Yorkshire puddings, Shepherd's pie, toad-in-the-hole, bubble and squeak, etc. The main things are stuff like Roast Dinner and Fish and Chips.
    Thank you!!
 
 
 
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