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    Just wondering how people are going to fund going to uni again. I've applied this year and failed (as anticipated!) and I've decided to think properly about how I plan to fund going back before I apply again. I've looked at what's available for help with the course, how much tuition fees etc can be subsidised, and I think actually paying for the degree is possible. BUT how are people planning on paying for accommodation, food and other things? It's obviously not feesable to work as well as study, but then I'll never be able to save up enough now to pay for everything while I'm there for four years.

    How is everyone managing to afford it all? Or is there extra help available that I've not seen?
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    Hi, I am also taking a year out to work and apply for GEM in 2018. I decided to do a full financial forecast for the 4 years to see what sort of money I would be able to get and what I would need.

    For tuition fees its quite simple, you just need to find that £3500 for the first year. Living gets a bit more complicated, because as you say part time work is very difficult during the course. I won't bore with all my workings out, but essentially I worked out that with the available SFE loan and NHS bursary, I would need an extra £3000 a year for living costs (covering rent, food etc). I am a bit lucky because I worked for a year before my current degree and saved some money and plan to do that again next year.

    In terms of support there I would recommend Warwicks website: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/a...es/medics2016/
    Its very good and clearly explains the financial options and what is available. Feel free to ask if theres anything else you want to know!
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    I went to Warwick and worked as a Resident Tutor throughout my four years, which came with free campus accommodation all year around. The accommodation was much better than students usually get on campus (i.e. a self-contained flat) and included bills, maintenance, and contents insurance. It also came with a campus parking permit.

    I had a job supervising one of the satellite libraries on campus, which essentially allowed me to do my reading/studying while being paid £10/hr. I also wrote questions for OnExamination, which meant being paid (per item) to revise. The NHS bursary was very welcome, particularly the part that paid for mileage and car parking expenses if that still exists. My partner was a PhD student so also brought in a modest stipend.

    Warwick was pretty generous in terms of scholarships/bursaries. I went travelling during my first summer vacation (Lord Rootes Memorial Fund), was paid £1000 to write a research paper in my spare time (Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme), had expenses covered to spend time on clinical attachments in other regions (Careers Service Work Experience Bursary), and received a significant contribution to my elective (Entwistle Medical Elective Bursary). I also picked up a few prizes (e.g. from the Royal Society of Medicine) that ranged between £125 and £750, which were also pretty good CV fodder.

    We felt pretty rich at the time and my only regret is that I continued to draw a student loan, which was completely unnecessary in retrospect and largely went on meals out and trips to Coventry's outrageously overpriced Odeon cinema...

    I accept that everyone's circumstances vary and that things change over time but there are many sneaky ways to mitigate costs, which sometimes only become apparent once you arrive and become integrated into the community. I presume other institutions provide similar opportunities.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I went to Warwick and worked as a Resident Tutor throughout my four years, which came with free campus accommodation all year around. The accommodation was much better than students usually get on campus (i.e. a self-contained flat) and included bills, maintenance, and contents insurance. It also came with a campus parking permit.

    I had a job supervising one of the satellite libraries on campus, which essentially allowed me to do my reading/studying while being paid £10/hr. I also wrote questions for OnExamination, which meant being paid (per item) to revise. The NHS bursary was very welcome, particularly the part that paid for mileage and car parking expenses if that still exists. My partner was a PhD student so also brought in a modest stipend.

    Warwick was pretty generous in terms of scholarships/bursaries. I went travelling during my first summer vacation (Lord Rootes Memorial Fund), was paid £1000 to write a research paper in my spare time (Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme), had expenses covered to spend time on clinical attachments in other regions (Careers Service Work Experience Bursary), and received a significant contribution to my elective (Entwistle Medical Elective Bursary). I also picked up a few prizes (e.g. from the Royal Society of Medicine) that ranged between £125 and £750, which were also pretty good CV fodder.

    We felt pretty rich at the time and my only regret is that I continued to draw a student loan, which was completely unnecessary in retrospect and largely went on meals out and trips to Coventry's outrageously overpriced Odeon cinema...

    I accept that everyone's circumstances vary and that things change over time but there are many sneaky ways to mitigate costs, which sometimes only become apparent once you arrive and become integrated into the community. I presume other institutions provide similar opportunities.
    Thank you for your reply, its great to hear from someone whose been there and done it! Warwick is my top choice so its good to know there are other options.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I went to Warwick and worked as a Resident Tutor throughout my four years, which came with free campus accommodation all year around. The accommodation was much better than students usually get on campus (i.e. a self-contained flat) and included bills, maintenance, and contents insurance. It also came with a campus parking permit.

    I had a job supervising one of the satellite libraries on campus, which essentially allowed me to do my reading/studying while being paid £10/hr. I also wrote questions for OnExamination, which meant being paid (per item) to revise. The NHS bursary was very welcome, particularly the part that paid for mileage and car parking expenses if that still exists. My partner was a PhD student so also brought in a modest stipend.

    Warwick was pretty generous in terms of scholarships/bursaries. I went travelling during my first summer vacation (Lord Rootes Memorial Fund), was paid £1000 to write a research paper in my spare time (Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme), had expenses covered to spend time on clinical attachments in other regions (Careers Service Work Experience Bursary), and received a significant contribution to my elective (Entwistle Medical Elective Bursary). I also picked up a few prizes (e.g. from the Royal Society of Medicine) that ranged between £125 and £750, which were also pretty good CV fodder.

    We felt pretty rich at the time and my only regret is that I continued to draw a student loan, which was completely unnecessary in retrospect and largely went on meals out and trips to Coventry's outrageously overpriced Odeon cinema...

    I accept that everyone's circumstances vary and that things change over time but there are many sneaky ways to mitigate costs, which sometimes only become apparent once you arrive and become integrated into the community. I presume other institutions provide similar opportunities.
    Wow I didn't actually realise there wasn't so much you can do while your actually there! What was the competition like for the resident tutor? I can imagine lots of people wanting to do it? I had a quick search on it and it looks quite intensive. Did you struggle trying to fit all of it in around your studies?

    I have had a look in the past, but I right in thinking that the NHS only provides financial support towards tuition fees and not towards living costs? Are there any types of bursarys or anything that are available just for living costs? It's all very confusion. I just want to make double sure I can actually fund going before I apply again this year!
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    (Original post by Joanne86)
    Wow I didn't actually realise there wasn't so much you can do while your actually there! What was the competition like for the resident tutor? I can imagine lots of people wanting to do it? I had a quick search on it and it looks quite intensive. Did you struggle trying to fit all of it in around your studies?
    Things might have changed over the last few years but I don't think the process is that competitive. I don't know how many applications/place they receive but that wouldn't necessarily help you anyway as many applicants aren't well suited to the role. They have also been known to leave vacancies empty if they don't have enough appointable candidates and to run a waiting list (filled as vacancies arise throughout the year) if they end up with too many appointable candidates.

    How intense it is depends a little on where you are placed and how proactive you are. Postgraduate halls tend to be "easier" but less rewarding. Welfare issues predominate in some halls (e.g. the en suites) and discipline issues in others. Some tutors build their whole lives around the role and others are completely absent but it is possible to

    It is very manageable alongside medical school and the experiences probably compliment each other as they exercise the same skills (listening, empathy, asking for help, crisis management, leadership, etc).

    It's actually quite a fun role sorting out room allocations for a new hall, meeting all the kids as they're dropped off by their parents on the first day, and seeing things "develop" as the year goes on.
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    (Original post by Joanne86)
    I have had a look in the past, but I right in thinking that the NHS only provides financial support towards tuition fees and not towards living costs? Are there any types of bursarys or anything that are available just for living costs? It's all very confusion. I just want to make double sure I can actually fund going before I apply again this year!
    In terms of graduate entry courses, my understanding is that you can claim from years 2-4:

    -Tuition fees (apparently only £3,465/year, which might well be less than the full amount).
    -Grant of £1,000/year.
    -Means-tested bursary towards living expenses (which, in my day, could mean receiving the full amount as most people had lived away from their parents for long enough to be assessed on their own income - I recall this being in the region of £4,000/year).

    There used to be a system whereby you could also claim back the costs of mileage and parking when on clinical placements. I don't see any mention of this now but the £1,000 grant is new so perhaps this has replaced the mileage payments. Can anyone else here shed any light if they've been through the system more recently?

    See this link for definitive information.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I went to Warwick and worked as a Resident Tutor throughout my four years, which came with free campus accommodation all year around. The accommodation was much better than students usually get on campus (i.e. a self-contained flat) and included bills, maintenance, and contents insurance. It also came with a campus parking permit.

    I had a job supervising one of the satellite libraries on campus, which essentially allowed me to do my reading/studying while being paid £10/hr. I also wrote questions for OnExamination, which meant being paid (per item) to revise. The NHS bursary was very welcome, particularly the part that paid for mileage and car parking expenses if that still exists. My partner was a PhD student so also brought in a modest stipend.

    Warwick was pretty generous in terms of scholarships/bursaries. I went travelling during my first summer vacation (Lord Rootes Memorial Fund), was paid £1000 to write a research paper in my spare time (Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme), had expenses covered to spend time on clinical attachments in other regions (Careers Service Work Experience Bursary), and received a significant contribution to my elective (Entwistle Medical Elective Bursary). I also picked up a few prizes (e.g. from the Royal Society of Medicine) that ranged between £125 and £750, which were also pretty good CV fodder.

    We felt pretty rich at the time and my only regret is that I continued to draw a student loan, which was completely unnecessary in retrospect and largely went on meals out and trips to Coventry's outrageously overpriced Odeon cinema...

    I accept that everyone's circumstances vary and that things change over time but there are many sneaky ways to mitigate costs, which sometimes only become apparent once you arrive and become integrated into the community. I presume other institutions provide similar opportunities.
    Thank you so much for taking the time to write this, I have firmed my place at Warwick GEM in September and I am looking for ways to finance my time there. My partner is a paramedic and we are considering, at least for the first year, moving up and sussing out the area before we look to sell and buy a house there. Moving ambulance trusts isn't straight forward and we would have to wait until particular stations become available so the resident tutor would be perfect financially and in regards to timing I think!

    You mentioned you lived with your partner, did they accommodate for couples and did your partner have to pay anything towards living there? I did my undergrad at Plymouth and the resident tutors there just had one of the en-suite rooms in a shared flat inside the halls, is this the same for Warwick? Could you tell me more about what the accommodation was like?

    Sorry for all of the questions, I appreciate the help!
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    (Original post by bmd2)
    You mentioned you lived with your partner, did they accommodate for couples and did your partner have to pay anything towards living there? I did my undergrad at Plymouth and the resident tutors there just had one of the en-suite rooms in a shared flat inside the halls, is this the same for Warwick? Could you tell me more about what the accommodation was like
    Congratulations on your offer!

    All the accommodation is suitable for partners. The smallest accommodation I lived in was created from three regular student bedrooms. Although that hall has since been demolished, I believe that was the smallest staff accommodation at the time. The largest Resident Tutor accommodation is probably in Lakeside (2-3 bedroom penthouses) and Westwood (small houses). The larger flats are hard to come by (because people tend not to ever leave once appointed to those areas...) but there is enough space for two people everywhere as long as you aren't downgrading from a mansion. If you progress up the hierarchy (Resident Tutor > Subwarden > Deputy Warden > Warden), you generally get more space but also more responsibility (and many more emails!!). The Wardens tend to live in their own houses on campus and receive a termly stipend.

    We certainly didn't pay anything for partners when I was there and I'd be surprised if that has changed since.

    It can be a difficult job (homesickness, anxious parents, personality clashes, parties, fire alarms, etc) but it is also interesting (mental illness, self-harm, student expulsions) and rewarding (guiding students through their first year and seeing relationships blossom as a result of how you allocated students to their corridor groups!). There is a cross-over between the skills exercised while training to be a doctor and working as a member of the residential team.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    Congratulations on your offer!

    All the accommodation is suitable for partners. The smallest accommodation I lived in was created from three regular student bedrooms. Although that hall has since been demolished, I believe that was the smallest staff accommodation at the time. The largest Resident Tutor accommodation is probably in Lakeside (2-3 bedroom penthouses) and Westwood (small houses). The larger flats are hard to come by (because people tend not to ever leave once appointed to those areas...) but there is enough space for two people everywhere as long as you aren't downgrading from a mansion. If you progress up the hierarchy (Resident Tutor > Subwarden > Deputy Warden > Warden), you generally get more space but also more responsibility (and many more emails!!). The Wardens tend to live in their own houses on campus and receive a termly stipend.

    We certainly didn't pay anything for partners when I was there and I'd be surprised if that has changed since.

    It can be a difficult job (homesickness, anxious parents, personality clashes, parties, fire alarms, etc) but it is also interesting (mental illness, self-harm, student expulsions) and rewarding (guiding students through their first year and seeing relationships blossom as a result of how you allocated students to their corridor groups!). There is a cross-over between the skills exercised while training to be a doctor and working as a member of the residential team.
    Thankyou! I'm so excited to start the course now! A bit nervous about keeping up (from a non-science background).
    That's good news. Do you share the accommodation with other residential staff then or do you each have individual flats?
    It does sound challenging! I can't remember having much interaction from our residential wardens during my time in halls but sounds like that's not a bad thing from what you're saying! I think I'll definitely apply when they become available, not something I had even thought about until this post so thanks again!


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    (Original post by bmd2)
    Do you share the accommodation with other residential staff then or do you each have individual flats?
    They are individual flats and not shared. Some tutors are very engaged with their students and others less so. It's inevitable that you become very involved with a small number of students and the others might well perceive you as having been absent.
 
 
 
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