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    Hi,

    I was wondering whether anyone within the TSR community is studying Medicine abroad. I am from the UK and found that other European universities could be a good option if I fail to get into medical school in the UK this year as an alternative to a gap year.


    From what I can see the pros:

    - Still get a GMC approved medical degree so after 6years you can apply to finish training in the UK.
    - Get to experience a new culture
    - The medical school takes a lot of international students every year

    Cons:

    - i'm not sure how finance works, it will probably be much harder without student finance.
    - although the course is taught in English I am worried about the quality of english/ teaching

    (There probably more pros and cons I haven't thought about)
    Could people help me either evaluate this is an option, or if anyone can help me by giving me information about their experience doing a degree abroad, that would be great
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
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    In my opinion it's a really bad idea. Facilties terrible. You really need to learn the language for clinical and they have classes especially made which you need to pass a test for, so medicine with a level latin classes (terrible). 6 Years, so one extra useless year (fail 2 subjects in first year you get kicked out). Its also much harder to pass medicine abroad because you fail your out, but countries like uk, usa they give you retakes in the summer.
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
    Hi,

    I was wondering whether anyone within the TSR community is studying Medicine abroad. I am from the UK and found that other European universities could be a good option if I fail to get into medical school in the UK this year as an alternative to a gap year.


    From what I can see the pros:

    - Still get a GMC approved medical degree so after 6years you can apply to finish training in the UK.
    - Get to experience a new culture
    - The medical school takes a lot of international students every year

    Cons:

    - i'm not sure how finance works, it will probably be much harder without student finance.
    - although the course is taught in English I am worried about the quality of english/ teaching

    (There probably more pros and cons I haven't thought about)
    Could people help me either evaluate this is an option, or if anyone can help me by giving me information about their experience doing a degree abroad, that would be great
    I think it is great idea and after doing a lot of research I am applying to Czech Republic. The facilities at the Czech universities are fantastic and I am looking forward to the experience of really living in other country.

    Plus if i graduate I will have a degree that is recognised all over the world.
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    (Original post by onthemoon)
    I think it is great idea and after doing a lot of research I am applying to Czech Republic. The facilities at the Czech universities are fantastic and I am looking forward to the experience of really living in other country.

    Plus if i graduate I will have a degree that is recognised all over the world.
    True, are you worried about the language barrier and quality of teaching etc?
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
    True, are you worried about the language barrier and quality of teaching etc?
    The idea that the quality of teaching is going to be lower just because it is not the UK could be seen as rather demeaning to those professors who are not from anglophone countries. The father of heredity genetics (Mendel) was in fact Czech. I am certain there are a lot of UK academics who look rather ordinary to some of the professors in the likes of Charles University (which is higher ranked than many UK universities despite only some of their research being published in English).

    I have been to Czech before and there was no language barrier as everyone spoke great English. All the academics are fully fluent in English. They have been teaching medicine in English for well over twenty years now.

    To be honest I am looking forward to learning Czech especially as it might make me popular with the local ladies
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    (Original post by onthemoon)
    The idea that the quality of teaching is going to be lower just because it is not the UK could be seen as rather demeaning to those professors who are not from anglophone countries. The father of heredity genetics (Mendel) was in fact Czech. I am certain there are a lot of UK academics who look rather ordinary to some of the professors in the likes of Charles University (which is higher ranked than many UK universities despite only some of their research being published in English).

    I have been to Czech before and there was no language barrier as everyone spoke great English. All the academics are fully fluent in English. They have been teaching medicine in English for well over twenty years now.

    To be honest I am looking forward to learning Czech especially as it might make me popular with the local ladies
    Apologies if I sounded as though I was undermining the professors. That wasn't at all my intention.

    I have spoken to a friend who did her medical degree in English abroad (not Czech so I can't compare) and she told me *some* of the professors quality of English wasn't as good as she had initially anticipated. This of course doesn't make them bad teachers, it was just in reference to their restricted vocabulary. Therefore, it is a worry for me in regards to whether I will be able to communicate my ideas properly to all members of staff.

    I wish you the best of luck applying and I hope you enjoy your studies there
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
    Apologies if I sounded as though I was undermining the professors. That wasn't at all my intention.

    I have spoken to a friend who did her medical degree in English abroad (not Czech so I can't compare) and she told me *some* of the professors quality of English wasn't as good as she had initially anticipated. This of course doesn't make them bad teachers, it was just in reference to their restricted vocabulary. Therefore, it is a worry for me in regards to whether I will be able to communicate my ideas properly to all members of staff.

    I wish you the best of luck applying and I hope you enjoy your studies there
    Where is she studying? I think there has been too much of a view that all European universities are the same. There are some diploma mills in Bulgaria and Romania accepting students with really poor grades and you just have to look at some of those agencies charging an arm and a leg to see clearly that there is something fishy going on.

    I have decided to go for those in the latest world rankings as I want to go to a university where my degree is not laughed at when I put it on my cv.
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    (Original post by onthemoon)
    Where is she studying? I think there has been too much of a view that all European universities are the same. There are some diploma mills in Bulgaria and Romania accepting students with really poor grades and you just have to look at some of those agencies charging an arm and a leg to see clearly that there is something fishy going on.

    I have decided to go for those in the latest world rankings as I want to go to a university where my degree is not laughed at when I put it on my cv.
    Italy.
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
    Italy.
    Cool. Really don't know much abut Italy apart from some of the universities don't do dissections which I thought would be a disadvantage.
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    Hi

    I study abroad in the Czech and love it.

    It's not easy by any means but medicine shouldn't be easy. As long as you put
    the work in you will eventually reap the rewards.

    There are pros and cons as you say. The main disadvantage is funding. In most cases you need to self finance or need the help of parents.

    Happy to answer any questions you have.

    Dee


    (Original post by medsch_1)
    Hi,

    I was wondering whether anyone within the TSR community is studying Medicine abroad. I am from the UK and found that other European universities could be a good option if I fail to get into medical school in the UK this year as an alternative to a gap year.


    From what I can see the pros:

    - Still get a GMC approved medical degree so after 6years you can apply to finish training in the UK.
    - Get to experience a new culture
    - The medical school takes a lot of international students every year

    Cons:

    - i'm not sure how finance works, it will probably be much harder without student finance.
    - although the course is taught in English I am worried about the quality of english/ teaching

    (There probably more pros and cons I haven't thought about)
    Could people help me either evaluate this is an option, or if anyone can help me by giving me information about their experience doing a degree abroad, that would be great
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    (Original post by onthemoon)
    I have been to Czech before and there was no language barrier as everyone spoke great English. All the academics are fully fluent in English. They have been teaching medicine in English for well over twenty years now.
    Its different talking to people as a tourist and different to talk to them as a doctor. Most of them speak English well enough to explain directions or chat over a cup of tea, but bear in mind that hospital setting is much, much different.
    I am not trying to put you off by any means, but you have to bear in mind that you will have to learn Czech and you will have to be more or less quite good at it.

    Also, facilities may be quite good, but unfortunately the mentality in Eastern Europe is different to the one you are used to. I recently heard quite a lot of good things about Czech doctors, so maybe that country finally decided to step out of Middle Age, but overall don't expect to learn too much about empathy, communication skills and well, respect for the patient.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    Its different talking to people as a tourist and different to talk to them as a doctor. Most of them speak English well enough to explain directions or chat over a cup of tea, but bear in mind that hospital setting is much, much different.
    I am not trying to put you off by any means, but you have to bear in mind that you will have to learn Czech and you will have to be more or less quite good at it.

    Also, facilities may be quite good, but unfortunately the mentality in Eastern Europe is different to the one you are used to. I recently heard quite a lot of good things about Czech doctors, so maybe that country finally decided to step out of Middle Age, but overall don't expect to learn too much about empathy, communication skills and well, respect for the patient.
    Don't worry I have been researching this for about a year. I am confident with the modules in Czech language and my own ability I will be fluent in Czech by the internship year. To be honest there is no excuse not to be fluent if living n the country.

    Actually Czech is not Eastern Europe (i.e. Bulgaria and Romania). It is central Europe and much in culture to Germany. Prague is one of Europe's best cities to start a new business apparently due to the highly educated and young population. Yes, there will be a difference in outlook and culture but to be honest anything is better than the mentality in BREXIT Britain at the moment!
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    (Original post by medsch_1)
    Hi,

    I was wondering whether anyone within the TSR community is studying Medicine abroad. I am from the UK and found that other European universities could be a good option if I fail to get into medical school in the UK this year as an alternative to a gap year.


    From what I can see the pros:

    - Still get a GMC approved medical degree so after 6years you can apply to finish training in the UK.
    - Get to experience a new culture
    - The medical school takes a lot of international students every year

    Cons:

    - i'm not sure how finance works, it will probably be much harder without student finance.
    - although the course is taught in English I am worried about the quality of english/ teaching

    (There probably more pros and cons I haven't thought about)
    Could people help me either evaluate this is an option, or if anyone can help me by giving me information about their experience doing a degree abroad, that would be great
    Hi!
    I am currently in my last year of study in the Czech Republic and I have been in 2 faculties in the time I have been here! If you want to message me, Id be happy to help with this and answer your questions, I know its a big decision and happy to share my experiences
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    I know this is an old thread but I was wondering if anyone else was considering an option like this. I have received an offer to study medicine, however, if results day goes wrong this doesn't seem like a terrible idea.

    Has anyone looked into this? Or are there any people who were originally from the UK and are currently studying internationally? It would be great to hear of peoples experiences and more ideas on it.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop786)
    I know this is an old thread but I was wondering if anyone else was considering an option like this. I have received an offer to study medicine, however, if results day goes wrong this doesn't seem like a terrible idea.

    Has anyone looked into this? Or are there any people who were originally from the UK and are currently studying internationally? It would be great to hear of peoples experiences and more ideas on it.
    I'm from the UK and studying at Charles University. If you have any questions I'd be happy to answer. I also have friends in other Czech Universities too.
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    How will BREXIT affect the GMC approved degree? If we start medicine in European universities now, then surely by the time we graduate it will no longer be approved by the GMC, correct?
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    (Original post by MedicDee)
    I'm from the UK and studying at Charles University. If you have any questions I'd be happy to answer. I also have friends in other Czech Universities too.
    Hi!

    Did you apply through an agency or directly? I'm really confused as to how to filter through universities as there are so many.

    I'm assuming you take the medicine course in English, do you find there are lots of international people on the course or is it predominantly people from Czech?
    Is it easy to get around and communicate with people? Are you expected to learn Czech for the clinical years and how much support do you get for this?

    Also, as another member mentioned above- do you know how BREXIT will affect the GMC approved degree?
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop786)
    Hi!

    Did you apply through an agency or directly? I'm really confused as to how to filter through universities as there are so many.

    I'm assuming you take the medicine course in English, do you find there are lots of international people on the course or is it predominantly people from Czech?
    Is it easy to get around and communicate with people? Are you expected to learn Czech for the clinical years and how much support do you get for this?

    Also, as another member mentioned above- do you know how BREXIT will affect the GMC approved degree?
    I study medicine abroad and think its probably the best decision I've made. I personally applied through an agency called Tutelage and they handled everything for me and were pretty quick with the paperwork and stuff.

    The medicine course is in English but they teach you the local language in class. For the English course, students are predominantly International. You would be expected to know basic terms in the local language just in case the patients don't know English.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop786)
    Hi!

    Did you apply through an agency or directly? I'm really confused as to how to filter through universities as there are so many.

    I'm assuming you take the medicine course in English, do you find there are lots of international people on the course or is it predominantly people from Czech?
    Is it easy to get around and communicate with people? Are you expected to learn Czech for the clinical years and how much support do you get for this?

    Also, as another member mentioned above- do you know how BREXIT will affect the GMC approved degree?
    I originally went through an agency. There are 7 faculties in the Czech Republic who offer medical degrees taught in English. I narrowed my choices down to 3 or them and luckily ended up in Prague which was my first choice. There's students on the course from all over the world. The majority in my year are from Germany and Sweden. You learn Czech from the 1st year, it's not too advanced but enough so you can communicate with patients during clinical years.
    Brexit is a good question - I personally don't think it will be a problem as the UK have a shortage of doctors so I'm sure the UK government wont make it difficult for British citizens to come back and practice. Who knows though! Time will tell.
 
 
 
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