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    Hi I'm currently in Year 12 and am wanting to go on to study architecture at university, maybe somewhere like Bath or UCL (but I'm not sure yet).

    I was just wondering what it's like studying architecture, such as are you in the studio every day? How often per week do you have lectures? How much free time do you have? And so on.

    If you could also say what uni you go to and whether it's a BSc or BA which they offer that would be very helpful to me too Thanks
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    Yes, it's pretty unenjoyable. Think twice.

    I did my BA at DMU and my MArch at UCL.
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    (Original post by jackharry)
    Hi I'm currently in Year 12 and am wanting to go on to study architecture at university, maybe somewhere like Bath or UCL (but I'm not sure yet).

    I was just wondering what it's like studying architecture, such as are you in the studio every day? How often per week do you have lectures? How much free time do you have? And so on.

    If you could also say what uni you go to and whether it's a BSc or BA which they offer that would be very helpful to me too Thanks

    Hey Jack! I'm in year 12 too!
    But because of the syllabus I study, I get to graduate in year 12.
    I've applied to:
    University if west of England ( for 2 different courses), Cardiff MET, Daerby, Plymouth.

    From what I've learnt from my counsellors,
    A BA in any technological or science related field like BA in architecture itself, in most cases does not train students to become skilled at a particular job but rather imparts students with knowledge in a broad range of areas. They may then specialise in a specific area at post graduate level.
    Where as in the BS is more professional focused and those awarded BS degrees can start on with their career immediately after school. The BA however is more oriented towards continuing study and it is common for students awarded with a BA degree to pursue a professional accreditation course to prepare them for professional work in the real working environment.
    For example, in BA architecture you will be given a chance to study art history related to architecture but the same will not be found in a BSC course and you may find structural engineering module instead.
    Also, sometimes out of two universities even if their course structure is almost the same, they may differ in BA or BSc In the end, it comes down to the course structure that, that uni wishes to follow.

    Within architecture there are many variations. There is architecture with planning, architectural technology, pure architecture , etc. I would suggest you first decided on a course and then look for the unis.
    I found mine using the league tables.
    https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ue-tables-2017

    They rank the universities and show the courses that they provide.
    All the best! Feel free to message me for anymore questions
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    There is no consistant difference with Architecture courses between BSc and BA. Judging a course based on that is a complete red herring.

    The post above is complete rubbish. You will have to study history of architecture in a BA and a BSc and you will have to study structures and technology in a BA and a BSc.

    The bit about accreditation is complete rubbish as well. To practice you will need an ARB accreddited course, which come in both BSc and BA form.
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    Hey! I'm currently studying BA architecture at DMU. It is fun but there are a lot of lectures and the projects basically take up the rest of my life. However, I do have some friends who skip lectures and party loads and then pull all nighters for the projects. Personally, I can't do that but depends on you. also, as the course is quite intense your always in and around uni you make some good friends on the course. There's also a bit of group work quite a bit actually so be prepared to work with some lazy people.... my worst nightmare. But other then that it consists of lectures, studio work nd a lot of sketching, model making and preparing for presentations in your free time. I'm in the studio pretty much whenever I'm not I'm lectures. . It's a nice new space and it's fun with friendsThe lectures depend like on the modules. Currently I have 3 modules so attend 3 lectures a week but as there will be more modules soon, more lectures.. Hope this helped! x
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    The degree type - BA / Bsc is based mostly on which department the University puts Architecture into, not the actual course content. ie. Some universities consider Architecture a "social science" and thus a humanities subject so you graduate with a BA, others consider its as part of an engineering or built environment school or something in which case they might give a BSc reflecting that they consider it a Sciences degree. Course content and structure is largely regulated by the RIBA so tends not to be wildly different between universities. Although different universities do tend to emphasise the artistic, environmental, social, technical elements to different degrees, which can but is not necessarily denoted by the degree type. The department you're in isn't particularly important, there doesn't tend to be too much crossover. You'll notice the effect a bit at higher up research and lecturer level and based on who you bump into in the corridors.

    If you want to be an "architect", you need to do an accreditated (by RIBA) architecture degree.

    I did my undergrad at Sheffield (BA). Architecture is a weird mix between brilliant and awful. It's a very time-consuming degree and you have to want to do it, but if you do, it can be incredibly rewarding. We were in studio most of the time, even in unscheduled time, the studio had 24 hour access and it wasn't uncommon for people to do all-nighters there, even in first year, which can create a pretty weird, intense environment. But you also learn alot from your peers and just... doing stuff, drawing, modelling, in a way that other courses might not, so that time together in the studio can be really useful and really fun at times too. The design studio is very much the focus of the degree at Sheffield, with other modules, environment, structure being based upon the core design module. There's also research and humanities work, architectural history that goes along side that. Almost anywhere you're going to have pretty much a full timetable though.
 
 
 
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