Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Is it possible for someone to hack into your webcam? Watch

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    They are vulnerable due to poor design choices, AV is ineffective way of dealing with these. You've been asking for the opinions of experts, and I get that fine, anyone can claim anything on the Internet, but Red Hat, a multi million dollar company which is extremely well known and authoritative, has said they don't see the need in anti virus software on their systems. You either do or you don't want the opinions of experts...
    How many of the girls on here who are afraid of having their nudes stolen are running Linux?
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Michiyo)
    Any idea how to solve the malfunction? XD

    Thank you a lot :hugs:
    Not sure, you'd probably have to uninstall the webcam driver which sounds too complicated lol
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by l'etranger)
    How many of the girls on here who are afraid of having their nudes stolen are running Linux?
    Lots of them if they sending nudes on Android.

    Not the point, AV is crap on Windows as well, it was a crap solution to a problem that really should be dealt with by MS themselves.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    Just one more question:
    Why do you think companies like Red Hat, SUSE, Google, Ubuntu don't use anti-virus software, and yet their products are run on most web servers, sensitive computers and even NASA? (not to mention the NSA)
    Because the majority of "viruses" are aimed at Windows machines since they take up a majority share of user computers. Your average Linux user is for example is going to be far more tech savvy in the first place.

    Linux runs on far more devices than Windows, ranging from servers to IoT devices. These types of device often require a completely different approach and in general a "virus" is not going to benefit the attacker. It's also more likely that the companies you mentioned are going to be taking a lot of steps to harden their boxes. Rather than using anti-virus to prevent viruses, they'd rather prevent someone from transmitting a virus in the first place. Antivirus in general is designed to protect you after the file has been downloaded. If Google are in a position where someone can upload a virus to their servers then they are too far gone for antivirus to be of much help.

    Antivirus here would be like having a piece of bulletproof glass protecting you when you've also got a 20ft thick armoured door. If someone gets past your door the glass probably won't do much good.

    Antivirus is aimed at consumers and is totally unecessary to someone that follows safe practices. Antivirus at a corporate level has it's place but if it's your first line of defence on something like a server then you'd really need to reconsider your security policy. Antivirus drops a net on the intruder but really you should be locking your door first.

    On top of that if a major company is getting attacked it is likely to be more serious than someone trying to steal your bank details with a virus. Someone seriously going after Google is probably going to have tools to circumvent antivirus and other security measures. Antivirus will protect the average user to an extent because the level of attack is so much lower. WHen you consider that antivirus isn't even reliable for consumers, it'd be detrimental for any serious company to rely on it.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    Lots of them if they sending nudes on Android.

    Not the point, AV is crap on Windows as well, it was a crap solution to a problem that really should be dealt with by MS themselves.
    >he doesn't use Tor on a virtual OS within linux

    noob
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pikachū)
    >he doesn't use Tor on a virtual OS within linux

    noob
    My computer is too **** to sandbox apps anyway tbh, I run out of ram. And i've given up on the whole privacy thing, if the gov wants to know what i'm doing fine.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    Lots of them if they sending nudes on Android.
    I was referring to laptops/desktops rather than smaller devices.

    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    Not the point, AV is crap on Windows as well, it was a crap solution to a problem that really should be dealt with by MS themselves.
    Maybe this is correct and there is certainly an argument to be made for it, but that does not make AV crap on Windows and for the vast majority of people including small businesses it provides a perfectly acceptable solution.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Michiyo)
    As soon as I press the power button.

    Sorry, I am not good with technology. I know it is probably nothing, but I wanted to check. X3
    Less likely to be a malfuction, more likely that when power is cycling to the componetns on start up it causes the light to power on as well. Not a guarantee that there isn't an issue but a light coming on when you press the power button sounds more like part of a normal power cycle.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josb)
    I have 283 videos of you masturbating and 157 pictures of you with your fingers up your nose.

    Gimme de monies now, or... :deal:
    They're not of me, they're of the lady who lives in my attic. :giggle:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Michiyo)
    As soon as I press the power button.

    Sorry, I am not good with technology. I know it is probably nothing, but I wanted to check. X3
    If it happens when the computer is turned off (not suspended) it's just the web cam letting you know it works, as the OS isn't even loaded. If it's from suspension may be the same. If it's on all the time you should look into it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    Because the majority of "viruses" are aimed at Windows machines since they take up a majority share of user computers. Your average Linux user is for example is going to be far more tech savvy in the first place.

    Linux runs on far more devices than Windows, ranging from servers to IoT devices. These types of device often require a completely different approach and in general a "virus" is not going to benefit the attacker. It's also more likely that the companies you mentioned are going to be taking a lot of steps to harden their boxes. Rather than using anti-virus to prevent viruses, they'd rather prevent someone from transmitting a virus in the first place. Antivirus in general is designed to protect you after the file has been downloaded. If Google are in a position where someone can upload a virus to their servers then they are too far gone for antivirus to be of much help.

    Antivirus here would be like having a piece of bulletproof glass protecting you when you've also got a 20ft thick armoured door. If someone gets past your door the glass probably won't do much good.

    Antivirus is aimed at consumers and is totally unecessary to someone that follows safe practices. Antivirus at a corporate level has it's place but if it's your first line of defence on something like a server then you'd really need to reconsider your security policy. Antivirus drops a net on the intruder but really you should be locking your door first.

    On top of that if a major company is getting attacked it is likely to be more serious than someone trying to steal your bank details with a virus. Someone seriously going after Google is probably going to have tools to circumvent antivirus and other security measures. Antivirus will protect the average user to an extent because the level of attack is so much lower. WHen you consider that antivirus isn't even reliable for consumers, it'd be detrimental for any serious company to rely on it.
    *slow clap*


    Thank you and I mean it. This thread is a mixture of female paranoia and male nerd signalling. There are clear differences in the needs of general members of the public, corporate users and more tech savvy people. This said it's clear that for average consumers for whom the main issues are drive-by downloads and accidentally clicking dodgy files, AV will more than meet their needs.
    • Community Assistant
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    Less likely to be a malfuction, more likely that when power is cycling to the componetns on start up it causes the light to power on as well. Not a guarantee that there isn't an issue but a light coming on when you press the power button sounds more like part of a normal power cycle.
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    If it happens when the computer is turned off (not suspended) it's just the web cam letting you know it works, as the OS isn't even loaded. If it's from suspension may be the same. If it's on all the time you should look into it.
    Thank you both! :hugs: IDK what is going on but never use my camera anyway so I will just tape it :laugh:

    As for how it happens, said light only appears for like two seconds when I turn on the laptop. I never thought much about it until this thread. :ahee:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    Because the majority of "viruses" are aimed at Windows machines since they take up a majority share of user computers. Your average Linux user is for example is going to be far more tech savvy in the first place.

    Linux runs on far more devices than Windows, ranging from servers to IoT devices. These types of device often require a completely different approach and in general a "virus" is not going to benefit the attacker. It's also more likely that the companies you mentioned are going to be taking a lot of steps to harden their boxes. Rather than using anti-virus to prevent viruses, they'd rather prevent someone from transmitting a virus in the first place. Antivirus in general is designed to protect you after the file has been downloaded. If Google are in a position where someone can upload a virus to their servers then they are too far gone for antivirus to be of much help.

    Antivirus here would be like having a piece of bulletproof glass protecting you when you've also got a 20ft thick armoured door. If someone gets past your door the glass probably won't do much good.

    Antivirus is aimed at consumers and is totally unecessary to someone that follows safe practices. Antivirus at a corporate level has it's place but if it's your first line of defence on something like a server then you'd really need to reconsider your security policy. Antivirus drops a net on the intruder but really you should be locking your door first.

    On top of that if a major company is getting attacked it is likely to be more serious than someone trying to steal your bank details with a virus. Someone seriously going after Google is probably going to have tools to circumvent antivirus and other security measures. Antivirus will protect the average user to an extent because the level of attack is so much lower. WHen you consider that antivirus isn't even reliable for consumers, it'd be detrimental for any serious company to rely on it.
    The best form of anti virus then is education to consumers (possibly at school in computing lessons to teach security and safety). While I agree more malware is written for Windows, most important data on the web runs linux or BSD or Solaris or some other system (AIX, whatever really), because it is designed with better security in mind.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by l'etranger)
    *slow clap*


    Thank you and I mean it. This thread is a mixture of female paranoia and male nerd signalling. There are clear differences in the needs of general members of the public, corporate users and more tech savvy people.
    But I always attributed the slow clap to sarcasm. I want fast clapping!

    Whenever someone says "can X be hacked" the answer is always yes. What people tend to forget is why would they? Why would someone spend time hacking into your average teenagers laptop? What do they have to gain? It's pretty unlikely that someone would actually target anyone in this thread specifically and if they did your average antivirus or security knowledge won't help you. On the other hand any sort of blanket attack on thousands of users will likely be picked up by decent security software and won't even make it to your machine if you apply common sense.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    But I always attributed the slow clap to sarcasm. I want fast clapping!

    Whenever someone says "can X be hacked" the answer is always yes. What people tend to forget is why would they? Why would someone spend time hacking into your average teenagers laptop? What do they have to gain? It's pretty unlikely that someone would actually target anyone in this thread specifically and if they did your average antivirus or security knowledge won't help you. On the other hand any sort of blanket attack on thousands of users will likely be picked up by decent security software and won't even make it to your machine if you apply common sense.
    Appreciate what I give you boy.

    Anything can be hacked, but that's like saying will someone kick in my front door pour petrol over me and burn me alive tonight? I mean sure they might do, but how many people have I annoyed enough for that to happen? Not too many we hope so it's not a rational fear to have. I could hire private security but given the risks it's not a reasonable course of action. I agree that given enough time and resources any webcam could be compromised, but that doesn't mean the average person should genuinely believe someone is going to compromise their webcam just because they saw it happen on TV once.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I have covered up my webcam now .
    From what I gather, in order for someone to have access to your webcam, your device needs to have a virus/trojan on it? I have antivirus software on my laptop and it hasn't detected anything in all of the years that I've had it.
    So I think I'm safe. Not that I have anything to hide, but I don't like the idea of being watched somewhere by a random person because that's creepy.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    The best form of anti virus then is education to consumers (possibly at school in computing lessons to teach security and safety). While I agree more malware is written for Windows, most important data on the web runs linux or BSD or Solaris or some other system (AIX, whatever really), because it is designed with better security in mind.
    Education and common sense always have and always will be the best form of security for general consumers. That said it does highlight an issue with how products are released. The consumer should not be responsible for poor security. There's always going to be uninformed users and developers should do more to aid security on their end.

    A really simple example is default passwords. The US experienced a major DDOS attack late last year, utilsing a botnet made up of IoT devices. They were easily hacked because users didn't change the default passwords. A simple prompt that doesn't allow the user to continue until they change the password could have prevented it.

    Schneier does a better job of explaining it than me but the general idea is stop trying to fix the user.

    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archiv...ty_design.html
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    Because the majority of "viruses" are aimed at Windows machines since they take up a majority share of user computers. Your average Linux user is for example is going to be far more tech savvy in the first place.

    Linux runs on far more devices than Windows, ranging from servers to IoT devices. These types of device often require a completely different approach and in general a "virus" is not going to benefit the attacker. It's also more likely that the companies you mentioned are going to be taking a lot of steps to harden their boxes. Rather than using anti-virus to prevent viruses, they'd rather prevent someone from transmitting a virus in the first place. Antivirus in general is designed to protect you after the file has been downloaded. If Google are in a position where someone can upload a virus to their servers then they are too far gone for antivirus to be of much help.

    Antivirus here would be like having a piece of bulletproof glass protecting you when you've also got a 20ft thick armoured door. If someone gets past your door the glass probably won't do much good.

    Antivirus is aimed at consumers and is totally unecessary to someone that follows safe practices. Antivirus at a corporate level has it's place but if it's your first line of defence on something like a server then you'd really need to reconsider your security policy. Antivirus drops a net on the intruder but really you should be locking your door first.

    On top of that if a major company is getting attacked it is likely to be more serious than someone trying to steal your bank details with a virus. Someone seriously going after Google is probably going to have tools to circumvent antivirus and other security measures. Antivirus will protect the average user to an extent because the level of attack is so much lower. WHen you consider that antivirus isn't even reliable for consumers, it'd be detrimental for any serious company to rely on it.
    Please remember that both microsoft and sony (xbone and pslive) have had their systems shut don't, by hackers and possibly anonymous affiliates.

    Fact is that hacking is about first of all systems entry, then secondly system take over, or extraction of target information, for either takeover or influence to be exerted in the future.

    Whilst it is possible, that some malignant group/s, did this to either sony or microsoft, with the aim of stealing users credit card informations, etc, and i'm not saying that this hasn't happened, it is also just as, if not more, likely that these were industrial scale hacks by industry experts, in order to compromise the security and reputation of these pretigious companies. Because whilst microsoft can boldy claim, look sony has been hacked a number of times, and users profiles and bank data, has potentially, been sold on the black market, sony can say exactly the same thing in defence.

    Fact is that, if you know what you are doing, it is easy to take over a computer. If given permission. With my old i3 computer, i gave a microsoft employee permission to spend a couple of hours installing office, remotely. He did that well and good, but he has also installed some form of trojan, which now informs me every time i run an internet explorer, that i am sharing the computer with another user. Plus everytime i shut down, it says the same thing. And there is literally nothing i can do about it.

    Or rather i probably could go on one of the online hacker defence/internet security/computer systems management forums to see if they can help me resolve this issue, and to be honest with you i think i will do this, but it seems like a great deal of time, in order to resolve a gltich.

    Truly someone can't just hack your computer without permission. They need a trojan or virus to be in place, in order for this to work, and in order to get that, you have to click on a dodgy link, or download, on an email or website. But once you have done this, you are opening a door for the hackers. Sure they can access your webcam with the light off. They can also read the contents of the files on your hard drive, and i have even heard of hacks which can install a trojan, which records key presses, thus is able to collect passwords that way. Although i have never seen this myself.

    Watch a program such as mr robot on amazon prime, if you want to learn more about hacking, or play uplink for the pc (even though it is about 15 years old). It also teaches you how to do, at least some elements of it, on that.

    Thanks again.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acsel)
    Education and common sense always have and always will be the best form of security for general consumers. That said it does highlight an issue with how products are released. The consumer should not be responsible for poor security. There's always going to be uninformed users and developers should do more to aid security on their end.

    A really simple example is default passwords. The US experienced a major DDOS attack late last year, utilsing a botnet made up of IoT devices. They were easily hacked because users didn't change the default passwords. A simple prompt that doesn't allow the user to continue until they change the password could have prevented it.

    Schneier does a better job of explaining it than me but the general idea is stop trying to fix the user.

    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archiv...ty_design.html
    This is what I mean though, in many cases the biggest risk to average Joe isn't the professional hacker who will target him specifically but their own stupidity when they use the word ''dog'' as their password or think that changing a few letters for numbers adds security to their password.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by john2054)
    Please remember that both microsoft and sony (xbone and pslive) have had their systems shut don't, by hackers and possibly anonymous affiliates.

    Fact is that hacking is about first of all systems entry, then secondly system take over, or extraction of target information, for either takeover or influence to be exerted in the future.

    Whilst it is possible, that some malignant group/s, did this to either sony or microsoft, with the aim of stealing users credit card informations, etc, and i'm not saying that this hasn't happened, it is also just as, if not more, likely that these were industrial scale hacks by industry experts, in order to compromise the security and reputation of these pretigious companies. Because whilst microsoft can boldy claim, look sony has been hacked a number of times, and users profiles and bank data, has potentially, been sold on the black market, sony can say exactly the same thing in defence.

    Fact is that, if you know what you are doing, it is easy to take over a computer. If given permission. With my old i3 computer, i gave a microsoft employee permission to spend a couple of hours installing office, remotely. He did that well and good, but he has also installed some form of trojan, which now informs me every time i run an internet explorer, that i am sharing the computer with another user. Plus everytime i shut down, it says the same thing. And there is literally nothing i can do about it.

    Or rather i probably could go on one of the online hacker defence/internet security/computer systems management forums to see if they can help me resolve this issue, and to be honest with you i think i will do this, but it seems like a great deal of time, in order to resolve a gltich.

    Truly someone can't just hack your computer without permission. They need a trojan or virus to be in place, in order for this to work, and in order to get that, you have to click on a dodgy link, or download, on an email or website. But once you have done this, you are opening a door for the hackers. Sure they can access your webcam with the light off. They can also read the contents of the files on your hard drive, and i have even heard of hacks which can install a trojan, which records key presses, thus is able to collect passwords that way. Although i have never seen this myself.

    Watch a program such as mr robot on amazon prime, if you want to learn more about hacking, or play uplink for the pc (even though it is about 15 years old). It also teaches you how to do, at least some elements of it, on that.

    Thanks again.
    Keyloggers aren't exactly rare or secret - they're mainstream, often used less maliciously for parents to monitor their children.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources
    AtCTs

    Ask the Community Team

    Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

    Welcome Lounge

    Welcome Lounge

    We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.