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Is it possible for someone to hack into your webcam? Watch

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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    Appreciate what I give you boy.

    Anything can be hacked, but that's like saying will someone kick in my front door pour petrol over me and burn me alive tonight? I mean sure they might do, but how many people have I annoyed enough for that to happen? Not too many we hope so it's not a rational fear to have. I could hire private security but given the risks it's not a reasonable course of action. I agree that given enough time and resourcessa any webcam could be compromised, but that doesn't mean the average person should genuinely believe someone is going to compromise their webcam just because they saw it happen on TV once.
    Agreed, which is precisely why I said that nobody here should be overly concerned that their webcam will be hacked. They're unlikely to be targeted specifically. That said:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/11...ng_tom_threat/

    The tl:dr of the article is that a Russian website was able to access hundreds of public IoT cameras, simply because they didn't have their passwords changed. This wasn't a matter of being hacked, the cameras were simply connected to the internet and the users didn't change the default settings, making them accessible to anyone. That baby monitor camera you've got set up? Anyone can go and view your baby online and it's got nothing to do with being hacked.
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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    Appreciate what I give you boy.

    Anything can be hacked, but that's like saying will someone kick in my front door pour petrol over me and burn me alive tonight? I mean sure they might do, but how many people have I annoyed enough for that to happen? Not too many we hope so it's not a rational fear to have. I could hire private security but given the risks it's not a reasonable course of action. I agree that given enough time and resources any webcam could be compromised, but that doesn't mean the average person should genuinely believe someone is going to compromise their webcam just because they saw it happen on TV once.
    I agree they're probably safe, but it still needs to be said that maybe not. There's a shocking level of trust in these things, and well, it clearly happens to some people so better safe than sorry.
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    (Original post by Abdukazam)
    I agree they're probably safe, but it still needs to be said that maybe not. There's a shocking level of trust in these things, and well, it clearly happens to some people so better safe than sorry.
    I would say there is too much mistrust. It's like GCHQ spying, am I happy about it? No probably not I would prefer not to be spied on, but I don't believe that anyone is looking at my personal data because I'm not important or interesting enough for them to care.
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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    I would say there is too much mistrust. It's like GCHQ spying, am I happy about it? No probably not I would prefer not to be spied on, but I don't believe that anyone is looking at my personal data because I'm not important or interesting enough for them to care.
    I'm actually not too bothered with GHCQ tbf. But problem with that is GHCQ are gov hired agency who target specific users. Random weirdos on the web spreading trojans is a bit more unpredictable.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Fact is that, if you know what you are doing, it is easy to take over a computer. If given permission. With my old i3 computer, i gave a microsoft employee permission to spend a couple of hours installing office, remotely. He did that well and good, but he has also installed some form of trojan, which now informs me every time i run an internet explorer, that i am sharing the computer with another user. Plus everytime i shut down, it says the same thing. And there is literally nothing i can do about it.

    Or rather i probably could go on one of the online hacker defence/internet security/computer systems management forums to see if they can help me resolve this issue, and to be honest with you i think i will do this, but it seems like a great deal of time, in order to resolve a gltich.

    Truly someone can't just hack your computer without permission. They need a trojan or virus to be in place, in order for this to work, and in order to get that, you have to click on a dodgy link, or download, on an email or website. But once you have done this, you are opening a door for the hackers. Sure they can access your webcam with the light off. They can also read the contents of the files on your hard drive, and i have even heard of hacks which can install a trojan, which records key presses, thus is able to collect passwords that way. Although i have never seen this myself.

    Watch a program such as mr robot on amazon prime, if you want to learn more about hacking, or play uplink for the pc (even though it is about 15 years old). It also teaches you how to do, at least some elements of it, on that.
    Permission is really not necessary for someone that is targeting you. At least they don't need permission from you. They might need to trick your computer into giving them permission to do something but they certainly don't need permission from the human part of the system.

    How do you know for sure that the "trojan" is only sending what it tells you? If you knowlingly have a virus of some sort and do nothing about it then you are part of the problem. You not only compromise yourself but you compromise everyone that comes into contact with your machine. Any USB drives, email contacts, other networked devices and so on.

    There is always something you can do. Generally the only way to be sure you've removed malware is to do a fresh install from safe media onto a clean disk. I recommend doing this asap if you are infected.

    Keyloggers are pretty common and it has been implied on more than one occasion that at university we should be checking our computers for suspicious devices, usually connected to USB ports but that doesn't rule out software keyloggers.

    Mr Robot (and any TV show) are horrible ways to learn about hacking. They are not at all realisitc. Entertaining maybe but not realistic. I'm studying forensic computing and TV shows like that are collectively considered a joke.
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    (Original post by jessyjellytot14)
    I have covered up my webcam now .
    From what I gather, in order for someone to have access to your webcam, your device needs to have a virus/trojan on it? I have antivirus software on my laptop and it hasn't detected anything in all of the years that I've had it.
    So I think I'm safe. Not that I have anything to hide, but I don't like the idea of being watched somewhere by a random person because that's creepy.
    It seems this thread has been over-populated by people who think they're advanced computer penetration testers. Yes, in order for someone to have full access to your computer they'd need to infect your computer with a virus. The way to avoid getting a virus is to be careful with what you download. Don't download things like "Facebook hacker" or "Twitter Hacker". Hackers advertise things like this since gullible people will download it. If it's too good to be true, 9/10 times it is.

    Antivirus software don't always pick up viruses, because hackers can encrypt the code in their virus. I wouldn't worry too much about the webcam thing though. Most hackers would infect you and use your computer to mine bitcoins in the background along with all the other victims they have
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    (Original post by Pikachū)
    iirc they get the current from the same wire so it's not possible to have one on without the other
    Some of the newest ones do, but I haven't heard about them being in internal webcams yet.

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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Permission is really not necessary for someone that is targeting you. At least they don't need permission from you. They might need to trick your computer into giving them permission to do something but they certainly don't need permission from the human part of the system.

    How do you know for sure that the "trojan" is only sending what it tells you? If you knowlingly have a virus of some sort and do nothing about it then you are part of the problem. You not only compromise yourself but you compromise everyone that comes into contact with your machine. Any USB drives, email contacts, other networked devices and so on.

    There is always something you can do. Generally the only way to be sure you've removed malware is to do a fresh install from safe media onto a clean disk. I recommend doing this asap if you are infected.

    Keyloggers are pretty common and it has been implied on more than one occasion that at university we should be checking our computers for suspicious devices, usually connected to USB ports but that doesn't rule out software keyloggers.

    Mr Robot (and any TV show) are horrible ways to learn about hacking. They are not at all realisitc. Entertaining maybe but not realistic. I'm studying forensic computing and TV shows like that are collectively considered a joke.
    Agree, far more cases of corporate espionage and jealous spouses spying on their partners happen this way rather than sitting by yourself on your laptop tapping away.
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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    I would say there is too much mistrust. It's like GCHQ spying, am I happy about it? No probably not I would prefer not to be spied on, but I don't believe that anyone is looking at my personal data because I'm not important or interesting enough for them to care.
    Totally this. Things like the snoopers charter might not be good for us but it doesn't mean we are all being watched, 24/7. Not by a person at least. There are far bigger priorities.
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    Firstly, if anyone is going to "Hack" your Webcam it will be a cracker not a hacker.
    What's the Difference?

    A Hacker actually makes the stuff and knows the weak ends and points of the computer. A cracker uses the stuff without even knowing how they work and inflating there pathetic ego.

    A Hacker would not target you unless you were (but not limited to): Rich or Famous.
    A cracker would target anyone pretty much, but would get caught in the act.
    So yes, it is possible to get your Webcam hacked but you will know it unless there is something extremely valuable you have to hide. In the Newer PC's the moment the Webcam is deemed "Active" an L.E.D will go on, there is no way around it (I have Contacted Toshiba about a similar problem).
    If the L.E.D has gone on, then you know your Webcam has been intruded and you should take Immediate action.
    Get Sophisticated Anti-Virus Softwares and always do one deep scan a week.
    Avoid Dodgy websites and if possible use Google Chrome as it has it's own internal sort of Protection system. Finally, Stick a piece of Tape over the Webam. I never use mine (too ugly), so I Broke it

    Source
    -meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
    Probably wrong lol
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    (Original post by Bulletzone)
    Firstly, if anyone is going to "Hack" your Webcam it will be a cracker not a hacker.
    What's the Difference?

    A Hacker actually makes the stuff and knows the weak ends and points of the computer. A cracker uses the stuff without even knowing how they work and inflating there pathetic ego.

    A Hacker would not target you unless you were (but not limited to): Rich or Famous.
    A cracker would target anyone pretty much, but would get caught in the act.

    Source
    -meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
    Probably wrong lol
    Pointless (and wrong) semantics.
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    (Original post by Mactotaur)
    Pointless (and wrong) semantics.
    yup
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    Nice pyjamas!
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Permission is really not necessary for someone that is targeting you. At least they don't need permission from you. They might need to trick your computer into giving them permission to do something but they certainly don't need permission from the human part of the system.

    How do you know for sure that the "trojan" is only sending what it tells you? If you knowlingly have a virus of some sort and do nothing about it then you are part of the problem. You not only compromise yourself but you compromise everyone that comes into contact with your machine. Any USB drives, email contacts, other networked devices and so on.

    There is always something you can do. Generally the only way to be sure you've removed malware is to do a fresh install from safe media onto a clean disk. I recommend doing this asap if you are infected.

    Keyloggers are pretty common and it has been implied on more than one occasion that at university we should be checking our computers for suspicious devices, usually connected to USB ports but that doesn't rule out software keyloggers.

    Mr Robot (and any TV show) are horrible ways to learn about hacking. They are not at all realisitc. Entertaining maybe but not realistic. I'm studying forensic computing and TV shows like that are collectively considered a joke.
    You need to do something (open the door), in order for the thief to walk in. I now use an ip bouncer, so my present computer can't be hacked, but i still think that some coding, a trojan of sorts, has been inserted in to my old system, to give microsoft some form of access. And it is no good just reinstalling everything, because for all i know i will fall down on the office installation, what happened last time, and thus require a call and systems management by microsoft again, which will let them install it all over again. The point is, that there are people out there, forums etc, with both the knowledge and means to fix computer problems like these free of charge. It normally takes some time and digging, but hopefully they will help me to do this. Let me send them a preliminary message, to get this looked at, right away....
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    Where my black mirror fans at?
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    Can't you just check security with anti-virus software?
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    (Original post by TheGreatPumpkin)
    Can't you just check security with anti-virus software?
    Anti-Virus can't detect all viruses. Read my replies above
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    (Original post by EC)
    But how??? My webcam lights up when being used so I'd notice if it started going shiny blue on its own.
    They can disable the light yknow. I'm MEANT to be security conscious given that I work in IT, and I've taken 3K worth of kit home (But only two firewalls lol!!) My view is "If someone wants to watch me sitting at a computer screen, they must be incredibly bored and...meh" I guess if you're say masturbating at the screen, then it's an issue. That's an episode of black mirror I believe.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    You need to do something (open the door), in order for the thief to walk in. I now use an ip bouncer, so my present computer can't be hacked, but i still think that some coding, a trojan of sorts, has been inserted in to my old system, to give microsoft some form of access. And it is no good just reinstalling everything, because for all i know i will fall down on the office installation, what happened last time, and thus require a call and systems management by microsoft again, which will let them install it all over again. The point is, that there are people out there, forums etc, with both the knowledge and means to fix computer problems like these free of charge. It normally takes some time and digging, but hopefully they will help me to do this. Let me send them a preliminary message, to get this looked at, right away....
    That's really not true. A user rarely has to open the door themselves because an attacker will take advantage of some flaw with the users system, such as unpatched software to gain access. A user can do nothing and they can be attacked.

    Using an "IP bouncer" will not stop someone hacking your computer. That is entirely laughable. It might make it harder but it certainly doesn't stop someone. Not to mention the odds of someone targeting you specifically is tiny. More likely is you'll download some malware online, for which your "IP bouncer" will do nothing.

    Microsoft don't install malware on computers (except Windows Vista). If someone from Microsoft installed malware then it wasn't Microsoft. How do you even know you have malware, specifically a trojan on the machine? Office is not difficult to install and should not require a call to anyone. Judging from your lack of knowledge it seems more likely that you installed malware yourself, or unknowingly gave someone else access to your PC and they installed malware for you. Or there may in fact be absolutely no malware in the first place.

    You are right, I've just given you the solution, for free, on a forum. If you have malware the only way you can be sure it is dealt with is to start from fresh. Sure some antivirus might succeed in scrubbing it but you can never be sure. Anyone that claims to be able to remove any type of malware without a reinstall is either exceptional (and thus won't be wasting their time on forums) or is a liar. If you want to get rid of the apparent malware you reinstall from scratch. But like I said there's absolutely no guarantee you've even got malware.
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    (Original post by TheGreatPumpkin)
    Can't you just check security with anti-virus software?
    Not likely. Antivirus MIGHT tell you if you have a virus but it's unlikely to do much in the way of telling you about your security.

    It also encourages entirely the wrong approach to security:

    "Oh it doesn't matter if I leave all the doors unlocked, it doesn't matter if serial killers walk into my home because I have a baseball bat to hit them with"

    You should be preventing malware from entering the system in the first place, not letting it in and hoping that your antivirus will pick it up.
 
 
 
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