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Is it possible to learn a language in a year? Watch

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    I'm currently attempting to learn French. I'm wondering if it's possible to learn French within a year, and if anyone has any advice/sources I would be grateful.

    EDIT: Not fluently, but enough to have lengthy conversations with other French people.
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    I'm currently attempting to learn French. I'm wondering if it's possible to learn French within a year, and if anyone has any advice/sources I would be grateful.
    I've heard it takes about 2 years of living in France to be 'fluent'.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I've heard it takes about 2 years of living in France to be 'fluent'.

    Try Rosetta Stone?
    Wait what :emo:

    And checking it now ty
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    It is possible, it just depends on (1) how much time you have available, (2) what resources you have available and (3) to what standard you want to get. The FSI estimates that in order to reach "general proficiency" in French, an English speaker will need to study for about 600 hours. That's less than two hours a day if you manage to keep it up for a year, but those estimates assume you're taking language classes so if you are self-studying, that might be an optimistic estimate. Still though, if the determination is there, I think you could become very good at French within a year.
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Wait what :emo:

    And checking it now ty
    That's to be fluent though, if you just want to be proficient then I'd say you could do it in a year. Immersing yourself in the country is what really fast tracks learning a language. I want to learn too!
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    It is possible, it just depends on (1) how much time you have available, (2) what resources you have available and (3) to what standard you want to get. The FSI estimates that in order to reach "general proficiency" in French, an English speaker will need to study for about 600 hours. That's less than two hours a day if you manage to keep it up for a year, but those estimates assume you're taking language classes so if you are self-studying, that might be an optimistic estimate. Still though, if the determination is there, I think you could become very good at French within a year.
    Thank you for your reply!
    I have a lot of time this year, and I'm determined. Two hours a day doesn't seem that bad :ninja:
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Wait what :emo:

    And checking it now ty
    I'm sorry but I really can't recommend Rosetta Stone, and neither do most linguists. I say that because I was a tester on their Welsh course and it was literally the most broken and poorly executed tool imaginable. I've seen French as well, it's little more than just words and pictures and the vocabulary they choose is not particularly helpful.

    I would recommend Duolingo and getting some GCSE/AS/.A2 textbooks and learning from them. French is to an extent easier to self-teach than a lot of other languages, although if you can go live/study there for a bit it also helps a lot.
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    I'm sorry but I really can't recommend Rosetta Stone, and neither do most linguists. I say that because I was a tester on their Welsh course and it was literally the most broken and poorly executed tool imaginable. I've seen French as well, it's little more than just words and pictures and the vocabulary they choose is not particularly helpful.

    I would recommend Duolingo and getting some GCSE/AS/.A2 textbooks and learning from them. French is to an extent easier to self-teach than a lot of other languages, although if you can go live/study there for a bit it also helps a lot.
    This ^

    Now that I think about it, Rosetta Stone was actually really annoying and repetitive, not much learning occured.

    My bad!
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Thank you for your reply!
    I have a lot of time this year, and I'm determined. Two hours a day doesn't seem that bad :ninja:
    Also just wanted to reiterate what SkyRees said, whilst I've not used Rosetta Stone myself, I've heard a lot of bad things about it. They spend a huge amount on advertising so they're very well known, but from what I've heard it's not actually very good. Duolingo is good, Anki is also an extremely useful resource for learning languages (although for something like French, Memrise could also be useful).
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    That's to be fluent though, if you just want to be proficient then I'd say you could do it in a year. Immersing yourself in the country is what really fast tracks learning a language. I want to learn too!
    I want to learn enough that I can have full conversations. Hm, I might go France in the summer then :emo: last time I went the only French phrase I said was "un fanta" to the McDonalds cashier :rofl: Do you want to learn French too?
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    I learned English in less than a year but English is so easy to learn 'cos it's everywhere.

    That said:

    Move to France or a French-speaking country and live there. Success is guaranteed.

    Failing that, watch films, listen to music and read stuff online (and off). Preferably things you like to read and draw your interest. Otherwise, you'll be bored quickly.

    Speak to people who know the language. Skype, etc.

    Immersion, as some people have suggested here, really is key.
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    Not unless you lived in France or had a native speaker which you spoke to everyday for long periods of time.

    You could certainly get to a decent level of conversational ability within a year, but 'fluency' (it's a very loose term) in a year is borderline impossible without living in the country.

    --

    Please do not purchase Rosetta Stone, it is not worth it.
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    I'm sorry but I really can't recommend Rosetta Stone, and neither do most linguists. I say that because I was a tester on their Welsh course and it was literally the most broken and poorly executed tool imaginable. I've seen French as well, it's little more than just words and pictures and the vocabulary they choose is not particularly helpful.

    I would recommend Duolingo and getting some GCSE/AS/.A2 textbooks and learning from them. French is to an extent easier to self-teach than a lot of other languages, although if you can go live/study there for a bit it also helps a lot.
    Ah okay, I'll keep that in mind.

    Just checked out Duolingo, it looks promising. Plus it's free too, thanks :ahee:
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    I want to learn enough that I can have full conversations. Hm, I might go France in the summer then :emo: last time I went the only French phrase I said was "un fanta" to the McDonalds cashier :rofl: Do you want to learn French too?
    I'd love to travel around France, beautiful language and place. I'm really bad at learning languages though
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Not unless you lived in France or had a native speaker which you spoke to everyday for long periods of time.

    You could certainly get to a decent level of conversational ability within a year, but 'fluency' (it's a very loose term) in a year is borderline impossible without living in the country.
    That's what I meant, I should've made my post clearer about this :emo:.
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    While the topic's about, does anyone know anything I can use for Italian? Other than Duolingo, which I'm already starting.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I'd love to travel around France, beautiful language and place. I'm really bad at learning languages though
    Agreed :moon:. Don't say that, have you even started?
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    I've been wanting to learn French as well to a level where I am able to have conversations. After doing GCSE French, the only way I taught myself more was by using duolingo and memrise
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    While the topic's about, does anyone know anything I can use for Italian? Other than Duolingo, which I'm already starting.
    Roset....Oh wait.

    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Agreed :moon:. Don't say that, have you even started?
    Un fanta...s'il vous plaît?
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    While the topic's about, does anyone know anything I can use for Italian? Other than Duolingo, which I'm already starting.
    For vocab learning, Memrise (more fun to use) or Anki (more powerful and flexible) are both great. There's also a great website called Lang-8 which allows you to write journal entries in a target language and get it corrected by native speakers, but I don't know how big the Italian audience is there.
 
 
 
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