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    Ok so I only have two January exams but one of them I'm just really panicking about. I barely understand any of the content from the module and I've tried to go through the lecture notes and understand it but I just don't get it and the problem I have is that the questions on the exam always ask you to proove things which we haven't learnt in lectures and it's always worth a lot of marks as well say maybe 8 marks and I never know what to write at all and so I'm just gonna end up missing out tonnes of questions and hence I think I'm going to not even get 40%. I've tried looking at past papers and solutions but I don't find it helps me very much as section A is hard and then section B is just always impossible like I can rote learn the definitions but that's not gonna get me many marks. Has anyone else been in the situation before where they just know no matter how hard they try and revise they're just not going to pass -_-
    Extra info : I'm studying maths and the exam is ' foundations of pure maths ' where you have to proove various things to do with sets and stuff for instance
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    Well, you've come to the right place to seek help. Have you posted regularly in the Maths forum here? I've been told that in very worst cases universities just give you stuff you're expected to learn.
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    Ok so I only have two January exams but one of them I'm just really panicking about. I barely understand any of the content from the module and I've tried to go through the lecture notes and understand it but I just don't get it and the problem I have is that the questions on the exam always ask you to proove things which we haven't learnt in lectures and it's always worth a lot of marks as well say maybe 8 marks and I never know what to write at all and so I'm just gonna end up missing out tonnes of questions and hence I think I'm going to not even get 40%. I've tried looking at past papers and solutions but I don't find it helps me very much as section A is hard and then section B is just always impossible like I can rote learn the definitions but that's not gonna get me many marks. Has anyone else been in the situation before where they just know no matter how hard they try and revise they're just not going to pass -_-
    Extra info : I'm studying maths and the exam is ' foundations of pure maths ' where you have to proove various things to do with sets and stuff for instance
    That sounds harder than our January exams. If you could give an example of the sort of thing you struggle with I might be able to assist, of course it's difficult to give comprehensive help in such a situation.
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    Well, you've come to the right place to seek help. Have you posted regularly in the Maths forum here? I've been told that in very worst cases universities just give you stuff you're expected to learn.
    I just feel like the exam repeatedly tests knowledge that is beyond the spec of the stuff covered in lectures or maybe one thing mentioned very briefly now forms the basis of an entire question and it's just like how am I supposed to revise if the things that appear little are the things that I'm gonna be asked loads about ; it just seems ridiculous and I'm just close to giving up entirely
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    I just feel like the exam repeatedly tests knowledge that is beyond the spec of the stuff covered in lectures or maybe one thing mentioned very briefly now forms the basis of an entire question and it's just like how am I supposed to revise if the things that appear little are the things that I'm gonna be asked loads about ; it just seems ridiculous and I'm just close to giving up entirely
    Unfortunately, this is uni-level learning. At school, you're "taught to test" - essentially, you are taught everything you need to know in order to pass exams, and also the required exam techniques.

    Uni is very different. When I started my degree, I was told that lectures would give me about 10% of what I needed in order to get a degree. The bulk of my learning experience would be independent work - in my subject, that was working through reading lists based on topics which were introduced in lectures. I'm not sure what the Maths equivalent would be, but I suspect that just rote learning lecture content won't be enough - you need to understand and practice how to apply those concepts. That aspect seems to be missing from your prep.

    If you do fail exams, get advice from your module leaders about how best to improve your working methods. You're clearly capable, or you wouldn't be at uni in the first place. It's just that you need to adjust your learning techniques for your new environment. This is pretty much what your fist year is all about - it's an apprenticeship in uni learning on which the second and third years can build. Failing first time round is OK as long as long as you treat it as a learning experience and get advice on how to improve.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Unfortunately, this is uni-level learning. At school, you're "taught to test" - essentially, you are taught everything you need to know in order to pass exams, and also the required exam techniques.

    Uni is very different. When I started my degree, I was told that lectures would give me about 10% of what I needed in order to get a degree. The bulk of my learning experience would be independent work - in my subject, that was working through reading lists based on topics which were introduced in lectures. I'm not sure what the Maths equivalent would be, but I suspect that just rote learning lecture content won't be enough - you need to understand and practice how to apply those concepts. That aspect seems to be missing from your prep.

    If you do fail exams, get advice from your module leaders about how best to improve your working methods. You're clearly capable, or you wouldn't be at uni in the first place. It's just that you need to adjust your learning techniques for your new environment. This is pretty much what your fist year is all about - it's an apprenticeship in uni learning on which the second and third years can build. Failing first time round is OK as long as long as you treat it as a learning experience and get advice on how to improve.
    Thank you I guess it is a learning curve and I'll try not to get too stressed if I do end up performing badly. It's just when it comes to knowing how to apply the content I just never know how to go about revising that and also a lot of the content for this particular module is pretty abstract and it's hard to find resources online which are accessible to a first heat student
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    Thank you I guess it is a learning curve and I'll try not to get too stressed if I do end up performing badly. It's just when it comes to knowing how to apply the content I just never know how to go about revising that and also a lot of the content for this particular module is pretty abstract and it's hard to find resources online which are accessible to a first heat student
    Report back here with your good results please! You'll do well!

    What were your a level subjects?
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    (Original post by MajorFader)
    Report back here with your good results please! You'll do well!

    What were your a level subjects?
    I'll tell everyone exactly what I get lol ... I admire your optimism
    My subjects were Maths English Lang and Psychology
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    Can't really be of help, but you're not alone. I'm pretty sure I am going to fail my January exam. It's completely my own fault though.

    All you can really do is try your best.
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    When do your exams start? How many do you have? Do you have a revision timetable created based on priorities? I'm sure you still have time to be able to do enough to pass, you just have to let yourself not be bogged down before then!
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Can't really be of help, but you're not alone. I'm pretty sure I am going to fail my January exam. It's completely my own fault though.

    All you can really do is try your best.
    I just have no motivation cause I've pretty much decided I'm gonna be leaving uni at the end of this year anyway as I'm not enjoying myself and dreading the thought of going back at the weekend cause I'm just around people I dislike and it pisses me off
    I just wanna be done with all of this
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    I just have no motivation cause I've pretty much decided I'm gonna be leaving uni at the end of this year anyway as I'm not enjoying myself and dreading the thought of going back at the weekend cause I'm just around people I dislike and it pisses me off
    I just wanna be done with all of this
    Did your course offer revision lectures? Or have you gone to speak to the course/module leader?
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Did your course offer revision lectures? Or have you gone to speak to the course/module leader?
    erm nope no such thing as revision lectures and no i haven't and there's not really time now to do that lol
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    erm nope no such thing as revision lectures and no i haven't and there's not really time now to do that lol
    They'll probably be around to speak to - a 15 minute conversation isn't going to harm your chances and might reassure you (I had a module once where the content changed substantially but noone mentioned it so we all revised based on past papers that were no longer valid for that module).
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    I wouldn't worry too much, if a paper is really hard the grades will usually be adjusted. Many people struggle with the "prove this in 10 minutes" kind of papers so the average mark will be low. I always did really bad at those as well which is why I pretty much had to abandon pure maths after 1st year
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Unfortunately, this is uni-level learning. At school, you're "taught to test" - essentially, you are taught everything you need to know in order to pass exams, and also the required exam techniques.

    Uni is very different. When I started my degree, I was told that lectures would give me about 10% of what I needed in order to get a degree. The bulk of my learning experience would be independent work - in my subject, that was working through reading lists based on topics which were introduced in lectures. I'm not sure what the Maths equivalent would be, but I suspect that just rote learning lecture content won't be enough - you need to understand and practice how to apply those concepts. That aspect seems to be missing from your prep.

    If you do fail exams, get advice from your module leaders about how best to improve your working methods. You're clearly capable, or you wouldn't be at uni in the first place. It's just that you need to adjust your learning techniques for your new environment. This is pretty much what your fist year is all about - it's an apprenticeship in uni learning on which the second and third years can build. Failing first time round is OK as long as long as you treat it as a learning experience and get advice on how to improve.
    Just thought I should point out that pure maths is uniquely difficult and it's pretty crazy that they're often 100% exam modules. So you have to answer like 10 questions in 2 hours and every single one is "prove this" which you're either good at or not (for some people the novelty of each question throws them as there is no set method and for others it's the time constraint so they never finish any proof).

    Like applied and stats also asks you to apply your knowledge to novel situations but not on the same scale under time pressure. So yeah, there is no shame in bailing on pure maths if you find those exams difficult: you either have it or you don't (I did not have it).

    But yeah, practice still helps a ton. You can scrape a pass just by knowing how to start off each proof properly even if it never goes anywhere.
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    Just thought I should point out that pure maths is uniquely difficult and it's pretty crazy that they're often 100% exam modules. So you have to answer like 10 questions in 2 hours and every single one is "prove this" which you're either good at or not (for some people the novelty of each question throws them as there is no set method and for others it's the time constraint so they never finish any proof).

    Like applied and stats also asks you to apply your knowledge to novel situations but not on the same scale under time pressure. So yeah, there is no shame in bailing on pure maths if you find those exams difficult: you either have it or you don't (I did not have it).

    But yeah, practice still helps a ton. You can scrape a pass just by knowing how to start off each proof properly even if it never goes anywhere.
    Oh thank you it's nice to know someone can appreciate my struggle with pure maths modules. It's easier to turn around and say you can just revise and you'll do well but for this module I just don't think that is the case. It is very true in the sense that some people get it and others don't as I know many people who seem to just be brilliant at doing proofs yet I always just never even know where to start besides writing like 'given that 'and just saying what is given in the question. I don't think I'm gonna end up having enough time to answer the questions tbh but then again I'll probably
    End up skipping most of the proofs as I'll have no clue how to even start let alone actually complete it. Some marks are allocated towards definitions so I'm spending ages trying to learn about 30 definitions but eve getting full marks on all of them won't be enough to pass. I expect around 35% in this module but I predict others will be getting firsts easily
 
 
 

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