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    (Original post by Murray Edwards Admissions)
    Last year's papers will be released later this spring on the website to give prospective applicants the chance to see them. When they're published then I think it's fine for them to be discussed here or anywhere else.
    ok, great
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    (Original post by Murray Edwards Admissions)
    Last year's papers will be released later this spring on the website to give prospective applicants the chance to see them. When they're published then I think it's fine for them to be discussed here or anywhere else.
    is it true that the format for NSAA is subject to change?
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    (Original post by Obiejess)
    I'm so done.
    You're not alone with that thought!
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    (Original post by Student1256)
    is it true that the format for NSAA is subject to change?
    All the assessment are subject to routine review. Any significant changes will be announced on the website in plenty of time. I don't know of any format changes to NSAA but, as a historian, I'm not involved in the process for it.

    The two significant changes I am aware of are that vets will now take the NSAA rather than BMAT and that Theology is moving from a pre-interview assessment to an at-interview assessment.
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    Handing in my EPQ tomorrow!!
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    (Original post by Naranja)
    Who else feels like they shouldn't have had an offer?
    Yep. At the sixth from I go to, if we look at purely GCSE performance I'm in the lower half of the year afaik. Yet I'm one of the offer holders, over several who are probably better qualified for Cambridge than I am. Obviously the admissions team saw something they liked, but what that is I couldnt possibly say.
    I assume you feel like you shouldnt have gotten an offer, why?


    (Original post by Obiejess)
    I'm so done.
    With what?
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    Can any A-Level historians give me some help, or just any nice people haha? (HolyRomanEmpire perhaps?)

    Well, obviously I'm aiming for an A*. My offer is A*A*A with an A* in History. I am on the Edexcel exam board and my revision consists of flashcarding/timelining/etc my textbook in effective ways and doing practise essays. This is also what we have been told to do by teachers.

    Last year on this paper I got 100%, which I was very proud of and I hope to replicate. I've finished Key Theme One, and I was feeling confident. My friend even quizzed me and I got everything right. I've also been doing practice essays and I've got high As or A*s in them all, as well as 'excellent' coursework according to my teacher.

    Today, in class, we were given two essay plan writing frames and two questions from the sample assessment papers. My teacher also showed us the indicative content, and we filled it in and talked through those questions as a class. In the indicative content I noticed that there were some points I wouldn't have made, and I looked through the textbook and those points weren't mentioned in it either.

    It's made me panic a little. I am probably being paranoid, but what if the exam rolls around and I get marked down for not putting these points in that weren't mentioned in the textbook (that is endorsed for my exam board)?

    Should I find another textbook and start my revision again as to include these extra points in? The problem is that this opens up a blackhole of trying to memorise too much. I don't know what to do or think. I guess I am just scared I get to the exam, open up the paper, answer it and I get a low grade because I didn't know some magic piece of information!!

    I do also read around my subject, obviously, but with so much content to learn you would expect the exam board to stick with what it provides. It is a bit unfair!

    EDIT: Maybe I should find another textbook and read it just to 'top-up' my knowledge?
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Can any A-Level historians give me some help, or just any nice people haha? (HolyRomanEmpire perhaps?)

    Well, obviously I'm aiming for an A*. My offer is A*A*A with an A* in History. I am on the Edexcel exam board and my revision consists of flashcarding/timelining/etc my textbook in effective ways and doing practise essays. This is also what we have been told to do by teachers.

    Last year on this paper I got 100%, which I was very proud of and I hope to replicate. I've finished Key Theme One, and I was feeling confident. My friend even quizzed me and I got everything right. I've also been doing practice essays and I've got high As or A*s in them all, as well as 'excellent' coursework according to my teacher.

    Today, in class, we were given two essay plan writing frames and two questions from the sample assessment papers. My teacher also showed us the indicative content, and we filled it in and talked through those questions as a class. In the indicative content I noticed that there were some points I wouldn't have made, and I looked through the textbook and those points weren't mentioned in it either.

    It's made me panic a little. I am probably being paranoid, but what if the exam rolls around and I get marked down for not putting these points in that weren't mentioned in the textbook (that is endorsed for my exam board)?

    Should I find another textbook and start my revision again as to include these extra points in? The problem is that this opens up a blackhole of trying to memorise too much. I don't know what to do or think. I guess I am just scared I get to the exam, open up the paper, answer it and I get a low grade because I didn't know some magic piece of information!!

    I do also read around my subject, obviously, but with so much content to learn you would expect the exam board to stick with what it provides. It is a bit unfair!

    EDIT: Maybe I should find another textbook and read it just to 'top-up' my knowledge?
    I personally don't think so unless the extra supplementary textbook is small/easily digestible. There's no point trying to memorise even more content when the course is big enough as it is. In theory your standard Edexcel textbook is meant to be detailed enough to allow you to reach an A*. The fact that those points weren't even in the textbook isn't something you should be worried about, if anything that's a misstep on Pearson/whoever's part. I'm not that surprised to be honest, our textbooks lack detail on certain areas and provide too much information on others, as well as being littered with serious errors. I wouldn't worry about it too much as long as you're still getting As and A*s n essays you write. Maybe ask your teacher what they think about it.

    If you've got the time I guess you could just continue with some wider reading. I'm currently reading a 100~ page "Access to History" book I found in the department on Henry VIII which has provided me with some nice relevant facts and points.
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Can any A-Level historians give me some help, or just any nice people haha? (HolyRomanEmpire perhaps?)

    Well, obviously I'm aiming for an A*. My offer is A*A*A with an A* in History. I am on the Edexcel exam board and my revision consists of flashcarding/timelining/etc my textbook in effective ways and doing practise essays. This is also what we have been told to do by teachers.

    Last year on this paper I got 100%, which I was very proud of and I hope to replicate. I've finished Key Theme One, and I was feeling confident. My friend even quizzed me and I got everything right. I've also been doing practice essays and I've got high As or A*s in them all, as well as 'excellent' coursework according to my teacher.

    Today, in class, we were given two essay plan writing frames and two questions from the sample assessment papers. My teacher also showed us the indicative content, and we filled it in and talked through those questions as a class. In the indicative content I noticed that there were some points I wouldn't have made, and I looked through the textbook and those points weren't mentioned in it either.

    It's made me panic a little. I am probably being paranoid, but what if the exam rolls around and I get marked down for not putting these points in that weren't mentioned in the textbook (that is endorsed for my exam board)?

    Should I find another textbook and start my revision again as to include these extra points in? The problem is that this opens up a blackhole of trying to memorise too much. I don't know what to do or think. I guess I am just scared I get to the exam, open up the paper, answer it and I get a low grade because I didn't know some magic piece of information!!

    I do also read around my subject, obviously, but with so much content to learn you would expect the exam board to stick with what it provides. It is a bit unfair!

    EDIT: Maybe I should find another textbook and read it just to 'top-up' my knowledge?
    You don't need to get 100% in every paper. You just need to be in the top x% of the cohort.

    If everyone is working from the same textbooks then it's a reasonably level playing field. And a playing field where you have already done extremely well in. If you get marked down (which you probably won't) then so will everyone else. In which case everyone is in the same boat, except you are much better than most in the first place. Just keep on doing what you're​ doing.

    You. Honestly. Will. Be. Fine.

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    (Original post by alow)
    Only if you include maths.
    Oh yh sorry haha!


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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    :yep:

    And, DamnDaniel2 that also means the offer:acceptance rate for maths alone is a miserly 48% vs 85% for all other courses. Pity the STEPpers...
    Yh that sucks! Although I'm hoping to apply for Maths at Cambridge this year so unlucky me hahaha. Seems quite exciting though going through STEP!


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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    snip
    I have a similar problem for English Language in that there's always more stuff to learn. But I've decided I have more than enough theorists now, and am working on learning how to use them to argue points. I've tried to read around like you say but I'm conscious it's a lot to remember! If History is anything like English Lang they might be looking for how you can argue points as well as having knowledge and even if you miss a point or so it shouldn't be too much of a problem. They can't expect you to know everything!

    Thanks to others who have answered as well.

    On a slightly related note, do you do English Lit? If so then Ibz Mo has done a nice long video about how he revised which might be helpful (can't remember if you were struggling with that or not?)

    https://youtu.be/F2wAp0gVKcs

    He also did one on Psychology and one on Sociology if anyone on here is doing those subjects/similar subjects. Worth a watch anyway if you have time 👍
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    (Original post by Steliata)
    I have a similar problem for English Language in that there's always more stuff to learn. But I've decided I have more than enough theorists now, and am working on learning how to use them to argue points. I've tried to read around like you say but I'm conscious it's a lot to remember! If History is anything like English Lang they might be looking for how you can argue points as well as having knowledge and even if you miss a point or so it shouldn't be too much of a problem. They can't expect you to know everything!

    Thanks to others who have answered as well.

    On a slightly related note, do you do English Lit? If so then Ibz Mo has done a nice long video about how he revised which might be helpful (can't remember if you were struggling with that or not?)

    https://youtu.be/F2wAp0gVKcs

    He also did one on Psychology and one on Sociology if anyone on here is doing those subjects/similar subjects. Worth a watch anyway if you have time 👍
    Oh I do English language too! I agree there's a lot to remember, although I find it more manageable than lit. How do you revise English language?

    Thanks so much for that video! I shall check it out during my next study time
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Oh I do English language too! I agree there's a lot to remember, although I find it more manageable than lit. How do you revise English language?

    Thanks so much for that video! I shall check it out during my next study time
    At the moment I'm still compiling notes into a big revision pack. I'm writing out all the theories and concepts I need to know in a consistent format and using different colours for different units (I find it easier to remember colour). The aim is to reduce all the theorists I need to one word. Then I'll use Quizlet to test myself on the words and expand on them. So that's how I learn theorists (I just used Quizlet without reducing it down last year but there's too many theorists now for that to be feasible)

    I'm also going to try and find some exam questions so I learn to apply the theorists and get good exam technique. But this is hard as there's only one specimen paper. So I'm not entirely sure what I'm going to do about that. I haven't been focusing much on the language analysis stuff recently though because they're skills we practised a lot last year and I know quite well, so I'll remind myself of them closer to the exam.

    How about you? And glad you think the video will be helpful 😊

    Edit: here is an idea of what my notes look like
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    (Original post by Steliata)
    At the moment I'm still compiling notes into a big revision pack. I'm writing out all the theories and concepts I need to know in a consistent format and using different colours for different units (I find it easier to remember colour). The aim is to reduce all the theorists I need to one word. Then I'll use Quizlet to test myself on the words and expand on them. So that's how I learn theorists (I just used Quizlet without reducing it down last year but there's too many theorists now for that to be feasible)

    I'm also going to try and find some exam questions so I learn to apply the theorists and get good exam technique. But this is hard as there's only one specimen paper. So I'm not entirely sure what I'm going to do about that. I haven't been focusing much on the language analysis stuff recently though because they're skills we practised a lot last year and I know quite well, so I'll remind myself of them closer to the exam.

    How about you? And glad you think the video will be helpful 😊

    Edit: here is an idea of what my notes look like
    Can I ask what exam board you are doing?
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Can any A-Level historians give me some help, or just any nice people haha? (HolyRomanEmpire perhaps?)

    Well, obviously I'm aiming for an A*. My offer is A*A*A with an A* in History. I am on the Edexcel exam board and my revision consists of flashcarding/timelining/etc my textbook in effective ways and doing practise essays. This is also what we have been told to do by teachers.

    Last year on this paper I got 100%, which I was very proud of and I hope to replicate. I've finished Key Theme One, and I was feeling confident. My friend even quizzed me and I got everything right. I've also been doing practice essays and I've got high As or A*s in them all, as well as 'excellent' coursework according to my teacher.

    Today, in class, we were given two essay plan writing frames and two questions from the sample assessment papers. My teacher also showed us the indicative content, and we filled it in and talked through those questions as a class. In the indicative content I noticed that there were some points I wouldn't have made, and I looked through the textbook and those points weren't mentioned in it either.

    It's made me panic a little. I am probably being paranoid, but what if the exam rolls around and I get marked down for not putting these points in that weren't mentioned in the textbook (that is endorsed for my exam board)?

    Should I find another textbook and start my revision again as to include these extra points in? The problem is that this opens up a blackhole of trying to memorise too much. I don't know what to do or think. I guess I am just scared I get to the exam, open up the paper, answer it and I get a low grade because I didn't know some magic piece of information!!

    I do also read around my subject, obviously, but with so much content to learn you would expect the exam board to stick with what it provides. It is a bit unfair!

    EDIT: Maybe I should find another textbook and read it just to 'top-up' my knowledge?
    My daughter is struggling with this in her Geography - she has been told by her teacher that if she knows everything in the specification and text book the best she can hope for is a C but if she wants a higher grade (and she needs at least an A) then she needs to do lots of extra reading around the topics. Does this sound right? She's doing AQA board.
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    (Original post by Tintin501)
    Can I ask what exam board you are doing?
    AQA 😊
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    (Original post by Tintin501)
    she has been told by her teacher that if she knows everything in the specification and text book the best she can hope for is a C but if she wants a higher grade (and she needs at least an A) then she needs to do lots of extra reading around the topics. Does this sound right?
    No.
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    (Original post by Tintin501)
    Does this sound right?
    That sounds rubbish tbf. It doesn't work like that

    Edit: but maybe direct her to the Geog study help forum for support and tips.
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=83
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    Steliata I shall reply to you tomorrow I have some stuff I want to say, but I'm too tired to do so.

    Just wanted to ask a general question about the tripos system to people here in general. This may sound stupid but does it allow you to dip into other subjects? Do you need formal training to do so? For example, my passion is history but I'm also interested in other disciplines that are, for the most part, closely related (classics, theology, politics, and philosophy).

    I don't mind if I can't but i thought i'd ask.
 
 
 
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