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    I get that it is a very respected degree, but I'm dubious about job prospects. It is such a general subject that seemingly lacks the practicality of other degrees(e.g. Engineering/Comp Sci).

    Yet that generality is also the reason why I'm considering it. I have no idea which career route I'd like to take and Physics seems to leave quite a lot of doors open.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
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    (Original post by 56th&Wabasha)
    I get that it is a very respected degree, but I'm dubious about job prospects. It is such a general subject that seemingly lacks the practicality of other degrees(e.g. Engineering/Comp Sci).

    Yet that generality is also the reason why I'm considering it. I have no idea which career route I'd like to take and Physics seems to leave quite a lot of doors open.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
    Physics is a great degree to do - it is scientific and requires intelligence. As a result many graduates end up in finance, as management consultants. You can go on to do law, teaching, any number of careers.
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    (Original post by 56th&Wabasha)
    I get that it is a very respected degree, but I'm dubious about job prospects. It is such a general subject that seemingly lacks the practicality of other degrees(e.g. Engineering/Comp Sci).

    Yet that generality is also the reason why I'm considering it. I have no idea which career route I'd like to take and Physics seems to leave quite a lot of doors open.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
    Try researching what possible jobs you could get with a degree in Physics. If it's not to your liking you could think about Engineering as it does have a lot of Physics and Maths.
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    (Original post by 56th&Wabasha)
    I get that it is a very respected degree, but I'm dubious about job prospects. It is such a general subject that seemingly lacks the practicality of other degrees(e.g. Engineering/Comp Sci).

    Yet that generality is also the reason why I'm considering it. I have no idea which career route I'd like to take and Physics seems to leave quite a lot of doors open.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
    Ignoring the obvious physics research or teaching career paths for now, most graduate job vacancies don't specify a degree subject. If you enjoy physics it makes perfect sense to take a degree in it.


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    I'm doing physics and I'd actually say yes.
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    (Original post by 56th&Wabasha)
    I get that it is a very respected degree, but I'm dubious about job prospects. It is such a general subject that seemingly lacks the practicality of other degrees(e.g. Engineering/Comp Sci).

    Yet that generality is also the reason why I'm considering it. I have no idea which career route I'd like to take and Physics seems to leave quite a lot of doors open.

    Any advice is much appreciated.
    I did physics, as I was in a similar situation. I think it has its advantages, and disadvantages.

    Since I graduated I've spent 1 year in software development (physics helped me get that job as the software was for mas spectrometers - but I didn't really use the skills beyond a bit of familiarity with the concepts).

    I then tried to get into engineering. This, I'll warn you, is very tricky with a Physics degree. I managed to get into Systems Engineering, which is more project management with an engineering bent really - not really designing things but making sure designed things all work together. To be honest I didn't enjoy it, and by luck got into data analytics. Spent a few years doing that but ultimately kept dipping back into software until I decided that was much more fun and I've been a software developer for a few years.

    So yes, it can give you some flexibility. It is a good degree - you can do lots of "numerical" jobs with it. Take a look at grad scheme requirements. You'll be able to do all the "any degree required" types (Project management, HR, Business Development, Sales, Marketing) and the "numerical degree" types (Finance, maybe, Accounting, Data Analytics, more Sciency stuff) BUT you will still struggle to get into the fields that require specific degrees like Engineering.

    Computer science, however, is much more open. Lots of software engineers have not got degrees in CS. It's easier to get yourself into by training yourself.

    You will have to teach yourself everything however, be able to show you can do stuff. Join open source communities and build a portfolio etc. I taught myself to program during my physics degree.

    I think I ended up getting lucky. I have friends who struggled to turn Physics into job prospects.
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    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    I did physics, as I was in a similar situation. I think it has its advantages, and disadvantages.

    Since I graduated I've spent 1 year in software development (physics helped me get that job as the software was for mas spectrometers - but I didn't really use the skills beyond a bit of familiarity with the concepts).

    I then tried to get into engineering. This, I'll warn you, is very tricky with a Physics degree. I managed to get into Systems Engineering, which is more project management with an engineering bent really - not really designing things but making sure designed things all work together. To be honest I didn't enjoy it, and by luck got into data analytics. Spent a few years doing that but ultimately kept dipping back into software until I decided that was much more fun and I've been a software developer for a few years.

    So yes, it can give you some flexibility. It is a good degree - you can do lots of "numerical" jobs with it. Take a look at grad scheme requirements. You'll be able to do all the "any degree required" types (Project management, HR, Business Development, Sales, Marketing) and the "numerical degree" types (Finance, maybe, Accounting, Data Analytics, more Sciency stuff) BUT you will still struggle to get into the fields that require specific degrees like Engineering.

    Computer science, however, is much more open. Lots of software engineers have not got degrees in CS. It's easier to get yourself into by training yourself.

    You will have to teach yourself everything however, be able to show you can do stuff. Join open source communities and build a portfolio etc. I taught myself to program during my physics degree.

    I think I ended up getting lucky. I have friends who struggled to turn Physics into job prospects.
    I think I can see myself going more towards finance/management in the future. Although I was seriously considering a mechanical engineering degree until I discovered the UK is apparently a pretty dire environment for mechanical engineers. I have zero experience with software/coding so I'm unsure whether I'd enjoy it, but it's good to know that'd still be an option in the future.
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    (Original post by 56th&Wabasha)
    I think I can see myself going more towards finance/management in the future. Although I was seriously considering a mechanical engineering degree until I discovered the UK is apparently a pretty dire environment for mechanical engineers. I have zero experience with software/coding so I'm unsure whether I'd enjoy it, but it's good to know that'd still be an option in the future.
    If that's the case a physics degree would do well. It's well respected.

    However, as always, a degree itself is reasonably worthless in the job market these days. It's a tick on a piece of paper, that thousands of others (in some cases even applying to the same position) already have.

    What's far more important during your time at university is getting some work experience. Not a single person on my grad scheme hadn't done a good summer internship (or two) or spent a year in industry. I myself applied for hundreds during my degree, and it was only after spending a year working after Uni I even got past the first few stages of the interview process. And it was pure luck I got that job - a year working in McDonalds probably wouldn't have helped much. I only applied to a single grad scheme and got through. Only change was a year of actual experience.

    Ever student interested in getting a decent job after University NEEDS to do internships, and a year in industry if possible.
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    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    If that's the case a physics degree would do well. It's well respected.

    However, as always, a degree itself is reasonably worthless in the job market these days. It's a tick on a piece of paper, that thousands of others (in some cases even applying to the same position) already have.

    What's far more important during your time at university is getting some work experience. Not a single person on my grad scheme hadn't done a good summer internship (or two) or spent a year in industry. I myself applied for hundreds during my degree, and it was only after spending a year working after Uni I even got past the first few stages of the interview process. And it was pure luck I got that job - a year working in McDonalds probably wouldn't have helped much. I only applied to a single grad scheme and got through. Only change was a year of actual experience.

    Ever student interested in getting a decent job after University NEEDS to do internships, and a year in industry if possible.
    If you could pick one in physics or mechanical engineering what would you pick? in terms of job prospects
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    (Original post by Pikachū)
    If you could pick one in physics or mechanical engineering what would you pick? in terms of job prospects
    Purely job prospects, Mech Eng. The reason? It's numerical, so can do all the "any degree/numerical degree" jobs - but it also has a lot of jobs that require it.

    The only jobs that require Physics is research positions, and academia. There's not many "Physics" jobs.

    Mechanical Engineering, however, has the same generic jobs but much more specific jobs that require a Mechanical Engineering degree specifically.

    But, if you know you don't want to do Mechanical Engineering, there's pretty much the same.
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    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    Purely job prospects, Mech Eng. The reason? It's numerical, so can do all the "any degree/numerical degree" jobs - but it also has a lot of jobs that require it.

    The only jobs that require Physics is research positions, and academia. There's not many "Physics" jobs.

    Mechanical Engineering, however, has the same generic jobs but much more specific jobs that require a Mechanical Engineering degree specifically.

    But, if you know you don't want to do Mechanical Engineering, there's pretty much the same.
    Unless you don't enjoy Mech Engineering that much and end up with a 2:2 or worse, instead of doing Physics and getting a 2:1 or better...



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    Hey, first of all, thank you for the insight. Secondly, are you an international student by any chance?
    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    I did physics, as I was in a similar situation. I think it has its advantages, and disadvantages.

    Since I graduated I've spent 1 year in software development (physics helped me get that job as the software was for mas spectrometers - but I didn't really use the skills beyond a bit of familiarity with the concepts).

    I then tried to get into engineering. This, I'll warn you, is very tricky with a Physics degree. I managed to get into Systems Engineering, which is more project management with an engineering bent really - not really designing things but making sure designed things all work together. To be honest I didn't enjoy it, and by luck got into data analytics. Spent a few years doing that but ultimately kept dipping back into software until I decided that was much more fun and I've been a software developer for a few years.

    So yes, it can give you some flexibility. It is a good degree - you can do lots of "numerical" jobs with it. Take a look at grad scheme requirements. You'll be able to do all the "any degree required" types (Project management, HR, Business Development, Sales, Marketing) and the "numerical degree" types (Finance, maybe, Accounting, Data Analytics, more Sciency stuff) BUT you will still struggle to get into the fields that require specific degrees like Engineering.

    Computer science, however, is much more open. Lots of software engineers have not got degrees in CS. It's easier to get yourself into by training yourself.

    You will have to teach yourself everything however, be able to show you can do stuff. Join open source communities and build a portfolio etc. I taught myself to program during my physics degree.

    I think I ended up getting lucky. I have friends who struggled to turn Physics into job prospects.
    H
 
 
 
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