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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    On the train goodbye Durham.... the game is on
    You know what I'm going to say already so I won't repeat it.
    Enjoy the experience.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yup. And only if you exceed the typical offer.

    Gap years are a good thing.



    eejits
    With new changes implemented this year, how do Cambridge use reformed AS grades for a gap year student who has already achieved full A2 grades?
    Someone on here said they become obsolete because A level exams are now linear and the final A Level exams constitute AS and A2 content.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    You know what I'm going to say already so I won't repeat it.
    Enjoy the experience.
    Looking forward to it! Will let you know how it goes

    Five Cambridge interviews though, this must be a record :lol:
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    On the train goodbye Durham.... the game is on
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by liziepie)
    Do you think you're going to reapply next year then?
    Only if I decide to take a gap year or that econ isn't for me.

    I won't reapply solely for the reason of getting into Cambridge.
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Looking forward to it! Will let you know how it goes

    Five Cambridge interviews though, this must be a record :lol:
    People would kill to have opportunities to talk about the subject they love with Cambridge academics, for five times!

    Best regards to Aldi.
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    (Original post by Student1256)
    What college did you apply to the first time?
    Fitz.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    People would kill to have opportunities to talk about the subject they love with Cambridge academics, for five times!

    Best regards to Aldi.
    Haha, I do feel incredibly lucky!!!

    EDIT: got a friend from home who's going to meet up with me at 4 (he's a second year at Cambridge). His best friend is a Medwards girl so he knows that area of Cambridge quite well.
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    (Original post by AKRYL)
    With new changes implemented this year, how do Cambridge use reformed AS grades for a gap year student who has already achieved full A2 grades?
    Someone on here said they become obsolete because A level exams are now linear and the final A Level exams constitute AS and A2 content.
    If you've got A-level grades already, that's what they look at.
    They use AS grades (and other data in your application) to 'predict' your likelihood of what you'll achieve at A-levels. (That's why they never focus very much at all on predictions made by your school as it's notoriously unreliable)
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Only if I decide to take a gap year or that econ isn't for me.

    I won't reapply solely for the reason of getting into Cambridge.
    That's a very sensible way of thinking.
    Take your time as long as you can. And best of luck. Hope you'll reach a decision that'll make you really happy.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    If you've got A-level grades already, that's what they look at.
    They use AS grades (and other data in your application) to 'predict' your likelihood of what you'll achieve at A-levels. (That's why they never focus very much at all on predictions made by your school as it's notoriously unreliable)
    So if someone's predictions are unreliable (A*A*A* for a student that got BBB at AS - I'm exaggerating a fair bit) but the person manages to make them, would they stand a much better chance post-results since they've far exceeded expectation?
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    That's a very sensible way of thinking.
    Take your time as long as you can. And best of luck. Hope you'll reach a decision that'll make you really happy.
    I probably won't decide until the summer, although I'll be preparing stuff to do on a potential gap year over the next few months - just so working at Sainsbury's isn't the only thing I can do for 12 months...
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    If you've got A-level grades already, that's what they look at.
    They use AS grades (and other data in your application) to 'predict' your likelihood of what you'll achieve at A-levels. (That's why they never focus very much at all on predictions made by your school as it's notoriously unreliable)
    So if I were to apply next year once I've received my A2 grades, my AS grades would not hinder my application?
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    physicsmaths what made you change your mind about the college you're applying to?


    (Original post by vincrows)
    Fitz.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    So if someone's predictions are unreliable (A*A*A* for a student that got BBB at AS - I'm exaggerating a fair bit) but the person manages to make them, would they stand a much better chance post-results since they've far exceeded expectation?
    Yes, but perhaps not in the way you're thinking.
    They'd probably dismiss an applicant like the extremely case you presented instantly because it's quite unrealistic to hope that's happen, unless there's a very serious case of extenuating circumstances that explains the poor performance at AS AND the proof that the situation has changed.
    But if someone has already achieved/exceeded necessary standard for application, they don't have any reason to refuse them a chance to proceed with the next stage of application process (interviews, pre-int assessment, etc) . What happened with AS becomes irrelevant to them because you've already achieved the minimum standard they require.
    It's possible they'd look at the huge improvement in grades AS > A-levels as a positive upward trajectory, though. But as repeatedly said, grades are only one part of application anyway, they'd use all data available to them to assess what your true (not one-time fluke, in either way) ability/potential is like.
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    (Original post by Student1256)
    physicsmaths what made you change your mind about the college you're applying to?
    I
    Most people re-apply to a different college, and that's what the university recommend too.
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    (Original post by AKRYL)
    So if I were to apply next year once I've received my A2 grades, my AS grades would not hinder my application?
    An admissions tutor would have to be pretty blind sighted to reject someone with A*AA/A*A*A on the basis of poor AS results within an otherwise strong application, unless the course was very competitive (eg medicine, law, E&M at The Other Place etc). Similarly, if someone's GCSEs were poor but the AS grades were substantially better (say someone with 1A*3A2B vs >95% UMS at AS level across 3 subjects), the emphasis would be on the AS.

    But then again, if you have two people with the exact same ability in tests/submitted work and interview and extremely similar results, GCSE/AS result could be the one small thing that knocks you out.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    I
    Most people re-apply to a different college, and that's what the university recommend too.
    Would this also apply to where you interviewed at? I really liked LMH but I don't know if interviewing there again would be the best idea xD
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    Would this also apply to where you interviewed at? I really liked LMH but I don't know if interviewing there again would be the best idea xD
    Yes. Possibly more so if they have interviewed you but rejected, because it's a fair chance they thought you weren't a right person for them after they have actually had a chance to meet you in person.
    It's much safer to try another college because they may be looking for a different thing/s in their applicants.

    Edit:
    The most important thing you should remember. Everyone loves their college at Cambridge, no matter if it's their first choice or was pooled there.
    You may think you like a certain college the best at this moment but it will easilynand very quickly change once/if you end up starting at another college. And in most cases, conceptions/images applicant have on colleges (and the university) are very different from how they really are.

    And that's why I've been saying many time to applicants not to spend too much time on deciding which college to apply to and not to invest too much feeling for them as you may Be pooled to other college and you'll be happy at whichever college you end up anyway.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    An admissions tutor would have to be pretty blind sighted to reject someone with A*AA/A*A*A on the basis of poor AS results within an otherwise strong application, unless the course was very competitive (eg medicine, law, E&M at The Other Place etc). Similarly, if someone's GCSEs were poor but the AS grades were substantially better (say someone with 1A*3A2B vs >95% UMS at AS level across 3 subjects), the emphasis would be on the AS.

    But then again, if you have two people with the exact same ability in tests/submitted work and interview and extremely similar results, GCSE/AS result could be the one small thing that knocks you out.
    I know someone who had 4As at AS, a great personal statement, loads of relevant reading, predictions above the standard offer and they got rejected before interview. This was for St John's...
 
 
 
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