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Cambridge application next year + how are my subjects for law? Watch

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    Okay I'm dropping maths before I do the AS and going to focus on RS, History, and Biology. I don't like maths and I just don't want to put the work in.
    I'm also doing an EPQ, I volunteer with an elderly woman, lead a team of 10 people at my local church, and achieved strong results in GCSEs (5 A*s and 4 As). Also have two weeks worth of work experience in commercial law firms, as well as attending many criminal court cases.

    Predicted grades are A*A*A.

    How strong are my chances for Cambridge based off this information? (Wishing to study law)
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    (Original post by Drewwww)
    Okay I'm dropping maths before I do the AS and going to focus on RS, History, and Biology. I don't like maths and I just don't want to put the work in.
    I'm also doing an EPQ, I volunteer with an elderly woman, lead a team of 10 people at my local church, and achieved strong results in GCSEs (5 A*s and 4 As). Also have two weeks worth of work experience in commercial law firms, as well as attending many criminal court cases.

    Predicted grades are A*A*A.

    How strong are my chances for Cambridge based off this information? (Wishing to study law)
    Maybe Cambridge isn't for you then.
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    (Original post by citibankrec)
    Maybe Cambridge isn't for you then.
    Whys that?
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    (Original post by citibankrec)
    Maybe Cambridge isn't for you then.
    HOLd on realised why - haha let me rephrase my bad - I'm struggling too much with it and it's not that I don't want to, it's that's i know my capacity and I wouldn't be able to get higher than a b - possibly a c
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    (Original post by Drewwww)
    Whys that?
    If you can't be bothered to finish AS maths the workload at Cambridge would mean that you may struggle.
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    (Original post by citibankrec)
    If you can't be bothered to finish AS maths the workload at Cambridge would mean that you may struggle.
    I put in a lot of extra effort in with regards to my other subjects, it's just I don't see much point in me finishing the AS with the possibilty of getting a bad grade that I have to put on my application - and because most only do three subjects in my year now, it doesn't make much sense.
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    I don't think dropping an AS is a particularly good idea as pretty much everyone applying will have 4/5 subjects.

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    (Original post by frozen_fire)
    I don't think dropping an AS is a particularly good idea as pretty much everyone applying will have 4/5 subjects.

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    This isn't necessarily true, with the movements towards Linear A levels, many people have opted to take 3. While its true that many high achieving students do 4. It shouldn't affect your application anyway, as they give offers on a 3 grade basis e.g. A*A*A, so perhaps it's best that they take 3 so they can focus more on the other subjects.
    That being said, I'm sure you'll be fine for applying for law. You do History which is standard for a law student. It is true that Philosophy is valued more than RS but any essay based subjects show an interest for law and will show you as being a potential candidate. Secondly, doing a science shows versatility. Maths would strengthen the application though. Good GCSE grades too. I'll be applying this year so good luck!
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    I've been told that Cambridge likes law applicants to have studied Maths A level. Your GCSEs are relatively weak for a Cambridge application - sticking with 4 AS subjects would help to counteract that, IF you can get an A in Maths.
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    This isn't necessarily true, with the movements towards Linear A levels, many people have opted to take 3. While its true that many high achieving students do 4. It shouldn't affect your application anyway, as they give offers on a 3 grade basis e.g. A*A*A, so perhaps it's best that they take 3 so they can focus more on the other subjects.
    That being said, I'm sure you'll be fine for applying for law. You do History which is standard for a law student. It is true that Philosophy is valued more than RS but any essay based subjects show an interest for law and will show you as being a potential candidate. Secondly, doing a science shows versatility. Maths would strengthen the application though. Good GCSE grades too. I'll be applying this year so good luck!
    I would say having the AS Maths puts the OP in a better position for applying. A student with 4 A grades at AS should be looked upon more favourably than someone with less. Certainly in my school, nobody took 3 AS subjects. Also, the OP'S GCSEs are good but probably below average for a Cambridge Law applicant.

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    (Original post by frozen_fire)
    I would say having the AS Maths puts the OP in a better position for applying. A student with 4 A grades at AS should be looked upon more favourably than someone with less. Certainly in my school, nobody took 3 AS subjects. Also, the OP'S GCSEs are good but probably below average for a Cambridge Law applicant.

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    You would say that and that's fine but the Cambridge website does not. 'Applicants studying 4 subjects will not normally be at an advantage to those studying 3'. Your school is your school. I go to a very good state college, only a handful of people take more than 3 a levels - me included. We still have very high Cambridge and Oxford success. It's better not to take an extra AS level than take one and fail it. And that's what the OP is saying, their maths skills aren't strong enough, it's best they don't take it because on UCAS you have to declare all your grades. Also, Cambridge do not care about GCSES half as much as Oxford. Many people will get into Cambridge with much lower GCSE grades. Cambridge website states 'most applicants have at least 4 or 5 A*s in their GCSES.' Which OP does. But Cambridge also states they have no formal GCSE requirements in terms of A*s. Yes law is extremely competitive, but there are more important things than GCSES such as the entry test, interview and personal statement.
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    You would say that and that's fine but the Cambridge website does not. 'Applicants studying 4 subjects will not normally be at an advantage to those studying 3'. Your school is your school. I go to a very good state college, only a handful of people take more than 3 a levels - me included. We still have very high Cambridge and Oxford success. It's better not to take an extra AS level than take one and fail it. And that's what the OP is saying, their maths skills aren't strong enough, it's best they don't take it because on UCAS you have to declare all your grades. Also, Cambridge do not care about GCSES half as much as Oxford. Many people will get into Cambridge with much lower GCSE grades. Cambridge website states 'most applicants have at least 4 or 5 A*s in their GCSES.' Which OP does. But Cambridge also states they have no formal GCSE requirements in terms of A*s. Yes law is extremely competitive, but there are more important things than GCSES such as the entry test, interview and personal statement.
    Well the Cambridge website is obviously not going to want to put off applicants by posting the stringent set of statistics that are reflective of the average applicant, particularly for Law. There may not be formal requirements but I am just being realistic when I say that the OP has good but relatively low GCSE grades that will play some part in selection. Taking Medicine for example, the average successful applicant will have 9 A*s.

    Whilst it may be common for students to do 3 A2 levels, doing 3 AS subjects is certainly rare.

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    (Original post by frozen_fire)
    Well the Cambridge website is obviously not going to want to put off applicants by posting the stringent set of requirements that are reflective of the average applicant, particularly for Law. There may not be formal requirements but I am just being realistic when I say that the OP has good but relatively low GCSE grades that will play a part in selection.

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    But it is true to say that Cambridge don't value GCSES as much as Oxford. There are plenty of people who get in with much lower GCSES than OP. GCSEs are taken into account with context. If someone went to a selective grammar school/private school and got 4A*s the rest A's and a B, then yes perhaps their grades would not be considered so good. But if someone got the same results from an average/not so good state school, and were in the top 5 of their year in terms of GCSE grades, then its a completely different circumstance. As I said, there are so many different elements to selection, such as the LNAT, Interview and Personal statement. GCSES are a small part of that. Yes, some people will be applying with 10A*s, but if they interview badly, don't do so great on the LNAT or have an average PS, OP has just as good as a change as they do. Yes law is competitive and Cambridge applicants can have 10*s and 5 a levels, but it doesn't mean all of them do or that it is reflective of the majority of applicants. As for starting with 3, its not rare, its dependant on your school and circumstance. At my college, you needed 72 points at GCSE to do 4 a levels, because of the change in A levels most are linear now and as it was considered the done thing to drop one after a year (which cant be done anymore in the majority of a levels) many students now start off with 3 instead of 4 as 4 a levels may be too much work for many students. There are so many different colleges at Cambridge all with different expectations, OP has to be smart about where he applies.
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    Just saying you should search up which colleges you like because I know some require a minimum amount of A*s at GCSE.

    For example, Churchill College require 8 or 9A*s at least (I've been told so don't know of that's true) for Medicine and Law.


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    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    Just saying you should search up which colleges you like because I know some require a minimum amount of A*s at GCSE.

    For example, Churchill College require 8 or 9A*s at least (I've been told so don't know of that's true) for Medicine and Law.


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    They say 'virtually everyone has achieved 9A*'s or more at GCSE.' and 4 subjects at a level is strongly required with 'A*A*AA'. Researching this, its true, like you say. OP needs to select a college which is not so tight on requirements, because although Cambridge as a whole says they have certain requirements, specific colleges will have their own expectations.
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    By the way op, if you're looking for a Cambridge college which is not as tight as Churchill, Trinity is a very good college and states:
    'There is no one type of perfect candidate. You do not need to have studied any particular subjects at A level. Almost any combination of school subjects is acceptable.It is advisable to take at least one subject that involves regular essay writing. Past performance is not everything: you need not have attained a certain number of A grade or A* grades.' Just be savvy and know that some colleges are very picky.
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    They say 'virtually everyone has achieved 9A*'s or more at GCSE.' and 4 subjects at a level is strongly required with 'A*A*AA'. Researching this, its true, like you say. OP needs to select a college which is not so tight on requirements, because although Cambridge as a whole says they have certain requirements, specific colleges will have their own expectations.
    Ah sorry! I thought it was a requirement.

    Hmm but if OP doesn't believe they can get a good grade in maths, I don't see why they should carry on. Sure some people can get amazing grades even if they struggle in the beginning but some people just genuinely know they cannot get a good grade.

    But yh that's true. It will strengthen their application and individual colleges do have their own requirements.


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    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    Ah sorry! I thought it was a requirement.

    Hmm but if OP doesn't believe they can get a good grade in maths, I don't see why they should carry on. Sure some people can get amazing grades even if they struggle in the beginning but some people just genuinely know they cannot get a good grade.

    But yh that's true. It will strengthen their application and individual colleges do have their own requirements.


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    It isn't a requirement but they said they will prefer students with these grades, which technically means it is. I agree totally, as you have to declare all grades on your UCAS form, a bad grade in maths will look worse than no grade at all.
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    It isn't a requirement but they said they will prefer students with these grades, which technically means it is. I agree totally, as you have to declare all grades on your UCAS form, a bad grade in maths will look worse than no grade at all.
    Oh right ok. But for maths they say they prefer a person taking maths, further maths and physics does that technically mean they require that?

    Because I want to do maths but don't have physics lol


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    (Original post by DamnDaniel2)
    Oh right ok. But for maths they say they prefer a person taking maths, further maths and physics does that technically mean they require that?

    Because I want to do maths but don't have physics lol


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    It depends on the college etc. Kings college cambs for example says 'An A level or equivalent in Mathematics is required. Further Mathematics is strongly recommended wherever possible. Physics is also desirable.' Physics is desirable, but not required. In this sense, they do mean that its just desirable as theyre not saying anything like 'students who have physics will be more likely to get a place' so you should be fine. Just make sure you check the college.
 
 
 
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