Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Phew, thanks a lot for taking the time to respond. I did make an account on doctors.net.uk, and got a fair few responses too. They weren't good safe to say!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    what did they say on doctors net ?

    i think now more doctors are having placements in psychiatry which does encourage more people to do it.

    there have been some changes so there generally more contact.

    - you can now do psychiatry as a FY1 (first year) doctor.
    - there are new services (psychiatric liaison) teams within general hospitals

    good points

    - better lifestyle than hospital specialities
    - on call is less stressful
    - training is prioritised
    - time - you have time to do things and long appointments (1 hour initial assessment, 30 minutes follow up) [whereas in GP and general hospital you are always rushing and firefighting])
    - consultants are generally friendly and approachable
    - shortage speciality - easy to get a training post as SHO and SpR level so this gives ability to work what you want, where you want

    negatives

    - mental health nurses do not have physical health training
    - wards normally far from general hospitals with no easy access to medical support on wards (so 'liaison' medical service)

    being a junior doctor in the NHS at the moment is really bad at the moment and it is getting worse over all sectors but in my experience psychiatry training is very cushy compared to hospital specialities and there are many positives you do not get in other areas.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I'm only a medical applicant atm but I'm really interested in psychiatry. Is it possible to gain shadowing experience in mental health - particularly in secondary care - or is this completely unheard of?

    I work around college as a HCA, but only on medical wards/outpatient. While I've had experience of caring for those with mental health issues who've come onto a medical ward, I've been told I can't pick up bank shifts on mental health due to not having 'the right code' :/ so can't get in that way.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thtgreeneyedgirl)
    I'm only a medical applicant atm but I'm really interested in psychiatry. Is it possible to gain shadowing experience in mental health - particularly in secondary care - or is this completely unheard of?

    I work around college as a HCA, but only on medical wards/outpatient. While I've had experience of caring for those with mental health issues who've come onto a medical ward, I've been told I can't pick up bank shifts on mental health due to not having 'the right code' :/ so can't get in that way.
    I did, yes. Initial contact was through someone I knew but still had to go through a fairly formal process, I wasn't shadowing the person I knew. Basically it's definitely possible.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thtgreeneyedgirl)
    I'm only a medical applicant atm but I'm really interested in psychiatry. Is it possible to gain shadowing experience in mental health - particularly in secondary care - or is this completely unheard of?

    I work around college as a HCA, but only on medical wards/outpatient. While I've had experience of caring for those with mental health issues who've come onto a medical ward, I've been told I can't pick up bank shifts on mental health due to not having 'the right code' :/ so can't get in that way.
    You can yes - its a just a bit more difficult because you should need the self defence training etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Revenged)
    what did they say on doctors net ?

    i think now more doctors are having placements in psychiatry which does encourage more people to do it.

    there have been some changes so there generally more contact.

    - you can now do psychiatry as a FY1 (first year) doctor.
    - there are new services (psychiatric liaison) teams within general hospitals

    good points

    - better lifestyle than hospital specialities
    - on call is less stressful
    - training is prioritised
    - time - you have time to do things and long appointments (1 hour initial assessment, 30 minutes follow up) [whereas in GP and general hospital you are always rushing and firefighting])
    - consultants are generally friendly and approachable
    - shortage speciality - easy to get a training post as SHO and SpR level so this gives ability to work what you want, where you want

    negatives

    - mental health nurses do not have physical health training
    - wards normally far from general hospitals with no easy access to medical support on wards (so 'liaison' medical service)

    being a junior doctor in the NHS at the moment is really bad at the moment and it is getting worse over all sectors but in my experience psychiatry training is very cushy compared to hospital specialities and there are many positives you do
    not get in other areas.
    Firstly, thanks to everyone for taking the time to have replied, it's been very helpful.

    Yeah the doctors.net people were very negative about it. The general gist I got was that psychiatry itself is interesting enough, the job itself is hell. They really didn't hold back when it came to that.

    I thought the same with regards to the shortage thing, though naturally that also means your job is more stressful as you don't have as many colleagues or something. It wasn't a side of it I thought about before but makes sense.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RPool)
    Yeah the doctors.net people were very negative about it.
    That thread is pretty funny - so many disillusioned doctors, sometimes seeming to be just ranting in general rather than about anything in particular? What on earth is the blue pill guy talking about...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nexttime)
    That thread is pretty funny - so many disillusioned doctors, sometimes seeming to be just ranting in general rather than about anything in particular? What on earth is the blue pill guy talking about...
    Certainly gave me a different sort of insight though....
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RPool)
    I thought the same with regards to the shortage thing, though naturally that also means your job is more stressful as you don't have as many colleagues or something. It wasn't a side of it I thought about before but makes sense.
    To be honest I don't really think the lack of doctors makes psychiatry stressful in the same way that a lack of resources makes A&E stressful (although both suffer from a lack of doctors and resources). National fill rates into CT1 was last year around 80% (and I'm pretty sure that doesn't include international recruitment who make up for most of the shortfall). This figure too is rising in the last few years whereas most specialties have gone down in recruitment numbers. From what I've seen support is pretty good between colleagues in psychiatry. You get a lot time for training and dedicated time for 'supervision' to talk over cases.

    At the end of the day the best thing to do is not to take any of us too seriously on the internet, see for yourself what the reality might be like and keep an open mind.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.