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    I read this news article this morning about an American student with perfect grades dropping out of university, feeling it was a waste of time and money and not essential for the future career he wants.

    Here's the link to the article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-38512064

    This got me thinking about how valuable university may seem during A-Levels versus how effective it may be in practice. From my own experience and from what I've heard from others, it sometimes seems that some colleges/sixth forms seem intent on simply trying to ship students off to university, viewing promising students more like statistics. I have no regrets about going to university but personally know a few people who went to university because of perceived pressure that it was the norm, soon to realise it wasn't for them. They were then torn between whether to stay or leave university because they didn't have any concrete alternative which I think is because alternatives weren't emphasised enough during sixth form.

    Do you guys think that if you have a clear career in mind and it can be attainable without the need of a university degree (and be learned through apprenticeships or independent study etc.) but it may take longer to advance in the field, is still worth going to university given the huge investment in money?

    Further, if you don't have a specific career in mind but wish to attend university to study a degree you find interesting even if you don't care if you don't end up pursuing it as a career (which was what I ended up doing), then do you feel it is worth the potential worry of figuring out what to do afterwards? Is the desire for the university experience and a passion to continue learning with no specific end goal enough to qualify as a good enough practical reason to go to university?

    Let me know your thoughts on the issue!
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    Thing is that employers often use the same circular reasoning that Sixth Forms have regarding university. They will look to employ graduates simply because a uni educated employee looks better than one who only got their A-levels, even if skill-wise they're about the same.

    Personally I don't regret uni at all, but career-wise my degree has been essentially useless in terms of skill application, the only use for the diploma has been in attracting graduate employers.
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    I don't think uni is necessary at all, when apprenticeships and internships are out there. It is fun and a good experience though!
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    (Original post by Amusing Elk)
    I read this news article this morning about an American student with perfect grades dropping out of university, feeling it was a waste of time and money and not essential for the future career he wants.

    Here's the link to the article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-38512064

    This got me thinking about how valuable university may seem during A-Levels versus how effective it may be in practice. From my own experience and from what I've heard from others, it sometimes seems that some colleges/sixth forms seem intent on simply trying to ship students off to university, viewing promising students more like statistics. I have no regrets about going to university but personally know a few people who went to university because of perceived pressure that it was the norm, soon to realise it wasn't for them. They were then torn between whether to stay or leave university because they didn't have any concrete alternative which I think is because alternatives weren't emphasised enough during sixth form.

    Do you guys think that if you have a clear career in mind and it can be attainable without the need of a university degree (and be learned through apprenticeships or independent study etc.) but it may take longer to advance in the field, is still worth going to university given the huge investment in money?

    Further, if you don't have a specific career in mind but wish to attend university to study a degree you find interesting even if you don't care if you don't end up pursuing it as a career (which was what I ended up doing), then do you feel it is worth the potential worry of figuring out what to do afterwards? Is the desire for the university experience and a passion to continue learning with no specific end goal enough to qualify as a good enough practical reason to go to university?

    Let me know your thoughts on the issue!
    I suppose it really depends on what you want to do with your life. Some people aren't ready to leave education and some people simply don't want to stay in education any longer! They'd rather get a job or start a business, there's loads of things you could do as opposed to going to uni. I suppose a lot of it is about the pressure and societal expectation that you will go to uni - whether you want to or not - that creates the media hype.
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    I do agree it's essential..lness... is over-exaggerated and you should not go if you do not feel it would be beneficial to your career (aka isn't necessary).

    The only reason I'm really going is because I can learn languages there but also because I need a degree to teach, which is kinda annoying and I wish there were an alternative route that wasn't so difficult to pursue.
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    Some people seem to have it in their heads that you must go to uni or you'll never be on a good wage, which is total BS. Certain careers indeed require degrees and so on, though there are any other careers which pay just as well that you can get into by jumping straight into work from school (or an apprenticeship) and working your way up the ladder.
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    (Original post by Paracosm)
    I suppose it really depends on what you want to do with your life. Some people aren't ready to leave education and some people simply don't want to stay in education any longer! They'd rather get a job or start a business, there's loads of things you could do as opposed to going to uni. I suppose a lot of it is about the pressure and societal expectation that you will go to uni - whether you want to or not - that creates the media hype.
    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I do agree it's essential..lness... is over-exaggerated and you should not go if you do not feel it would be beneficial to your career (aka isn't necessary).

    The only reason I'm really going is because I can learn languages there but also because I need a degree to teach, which is kinda annoying and I wish there were an alternative route that wasn't so difficult to pursue.
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Some people seem to have it in their heads that you must go to uni or you'll never be on a good wage, which is total BS. Certain careers indeed require degrees and so on, though there are any other careers which pay just as well that you can get into by jumping straight into work from school (or an apprenticeship) and working your way up the ladder.
    From these posts, it's clear that the focus should be on the individual applying to university at all times. It's an important choice that I think many students feel they need to rush to make a decision when it should be made perfectly clear that it's okay to wait. I took a year off in between A-Levels and University and it did me the world of good since I could spend my second year of A-Levels solely on tackling my A-Levels (which is certainly stressful enough - now more than ever - without the issue of thinking about university) and then could think much more clearly about a university degree afterwards. If I rushed my decision I know that I would not have had the great experience I ended up having.

    It's such a mammoth decision that it can take months before you can really tell if it's right for you but this does not appear to be reflected in the ways that colleges tend to over-exaggerate university in my opinion.
 
 
 
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