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Started a physics degree but no idea what I want to do. Watch

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    I've started my degree in physics and astronomy, and I'm just coming up to my first set of exams but I have no idea what to I want to do after. I chose the subject because it's interesting, I'm good at it, and I was told it would be a good general degree that would open many doors but now a quick online search and what I've experienced so far suggests that it's much more limiting than I thought. I can't see myself going on to get a PHD and do the research side mainly because I want to start a family when I can and I don't want to have to wait too long before I can buy a house. I've considered going on to teaching but that just feels like a waste, I'm afraid I'd feel under stimulated and bored. I feel like if this degree wont get me a good job that I enjoy, then there may not be much point continuing to pursue it, but I feel like I don't know enough to make that decision.
    Any advice would be helpful.
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    (Original post by suiagg)
    I've started my degree in physics and astronomy, and I'm just coming up to my first set of exams but I have no idea what to I want to do after. I chose the subject because it's interesting, I'm good at it, and I was told it would be a good general degree that would open many doors but now a quick online search and what I've experienced so far suggests that it's much more limiting than I thought. I can't see myself going on to get a PHD and do the research side mainly because I want to start a family when I can and I don't want to have to wait too long before I can buy a house. I've considered going on to teaching but that just feels like a waste, I'm afraid I'd feel under stimulated and bored. I feel like if this degree wont get me a good job that I enjoy, then there may not be much point continuing to pursue it, but I feel like I don't know enough to make that decision.
    Any advice would be helpful.
    Most grad jobs don't require a particular degree, whether they are in business, finance, accounting, management, government or the like. What matters more is how you do in the application process and having work experience can really make a difference. So I would get on with looking for some work experience or work shadowing so you can find out what some careers are really like.
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    (Original post by suiagg)
    I've started my degree in physics and astronomy, and I'm just coming up to my first set of exams but I have no idea what to I want to do after. I chose the subject because it's interesting, I'm good at it, and I was told it would be a good general degree that would open many doors but now a quick online search and what I've experienced so far suggests that it's much more limiting than I thought. I can't see myself going on to get a PHD and do the research side mainly because I want to start a family when I can and I don't want to have to wait too long before I can buy a house. I've considered going on to teaching but that just feels like a waste, I'm afraid I'd feel under stimulated and bored. I feel like if this degree wont get me a good job that I enjoy, then there may not be much point continuing to pursue it, but I feel like I don't know enough to make that decision.
    Any advice would be helpful.
    A physics degree is very desirable. You'll be able to get a graduate job with little difficulty.
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    (Original post by suiagg)
    I've started my degree in physics and astronomy, and I'm just coming up to my first set of exams but I have no idea what to I want to do after. I chose the subject because it's interesting, I'm good at it, and I was told it would be a good general degree that would open many doors but now a quick online search and what I've experienced so far suggests that it's much more limiting than I thought. I can't see myself going on to get a PHD and do the research side mainly because I want to start a family when I can and I don't want to have to wait too long before I can buy a house. I've considered going on to teaching but that just feels like a waste, I'm afraid I'd feel under stimulated and bored. I feel like if this degree wont get me a good job that I enjoy, then there may not be much point continuing to pursue it, but I feel like I don't know enough to make that decision.
    Any advice would be helpful.
    From my own experience, I graduated with an MPhys Physics and Astro in 2011 and since have been working for Dstl working on military technology, so it can open some pretty cool doors for you. I'm now applying for Graduate Medicine, so it really can take you anywhere.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Most grad jobs don't require a particular degree, whether they are in business, finance, accounting, management, government or the like. What matters more is how you do in the application process and having work experience can really make a difference. So I would get on with looking for some work experience or work shadowing so you can find out what some careers are really like.
    this^^

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    (Original post by Mr M)
    A physics degree is very desirable. You'll be able to get a graduate job with little difficulty.
    I'm sorry, Mr. M, but it doesn't quite work like that anymore. You see, degrees - even well respected ones like physics - are a dime a dozen nowadays and there simply aren't enough graduate jobs to go around.

    In order to have even a shot at a graduate job you will need plenty of relevant work experience, the degree is merely the tick in the box that gets you past only the very first stage of the application.
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    (Original post by Len Goodman)
    I'm sorry, Mr. M, but it doesn't quite work like that anymore. You see, degrees - even well respected ones like physics - are a dime a dozen nowadays and there simply aren't enough graduate jobs to go around.

    In order to have even a shot at a graduate job you will need plenty of relevant work experience, the degree is merely the tick in the box that gets you past only the very first stage of the application.
    What rot. The OP mentioned teaching so here's one example of a guaranteed position. He could be paid £30,000 to train to teach physics and then would have the pick of the thousands of schools that do not have a single physics specialist who would fight to recruit him.

    Before you tell me I don't know what I am talking about, I am a physics graduate and have personally been involved in the recruitment and appointment of a large number of science teachers.
 
 
 
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