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Professor says he will publicly shame students for imperfect work Watch

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    (Original post by emmyloo22)
    I'm taking an upper level (but introductory) cartography/GIS class this semester, and I am concerned about something my professor has written in his syllabus.

    It says, and I quote: "Any map you turn in must be cartographically perfect. After a few weeks in this class, you should have learned how to make a great map. Poorly constructed maps will be displayed each week for the rest of the class to critique, with your name prominently mentioned. They will also be shown in future semesters as examples of 'bad' maps."

    My family and I think that this is BEYOND inappropriate. I've had professors anonymously post examples of good and bad work. I have also had professors ask my permission to use my work as examples in future classes -- always with the promise of my name being removed. This is over the top though. I cannot believe that my university would allow a professor to publicly name and shame a student for imperfect work. What do you guys think? The more I think about it, the angrier I get. I want to report this to the department head, but at the same time, I'm worried about pissing this guy off.
    You are right to be angry, I would be myself if one of my teachers at school did that. It is mildly inappropriate and I agree, you should talk to the department head saying that this isn't right.
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    Gosh. Things have gone further downhill in British universities than I thought. Somebody should get the heating turned off immediately lest any more snowflakes melt away in the white heat of the education system.

    Heaven help any of today's students when they emerge into full employment and have to attend team meetings where their lack of progress or shoddy work is scrutinised while the rest of the team (and senior management) listens avidly and chips in.

    Worse still, how will they survive the hot blast when they attend a client meeting at which their disappointed customer vents his feelings at (and delivers the consequences of) a poor or late delivery?

    Quite how western civilisation will make it beyond the first quarter of this century is beyond me if everyone is going to fold under the slightest pressure.

    Optimistically, perhaps all this talk of professors and semesters means that it only applies to American snowflakes, and we British are still made of sterner stuff.
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    Report it. Report it right now. I don't care if it upsets the *******, if he's going to humiliate you or your friends or anyone taking this course in such a way then he has no place in a professional atmosphere. And if he gets mean report him again, and again, and again until they fire him for non-professional conduct.
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    It might be just a scare-tactic to make students work hard. You could wait to see what actually happens, all of my undergrad and postgrad students showcase their work and it's discussed in class. This happens from KS1 right up to adult learning so students should be used to it. It's not okay to make a point of work being bad for the sake of it though, that would discourage most people.

    If you do complain it will be anonymous so I wouldn't worry about the professor being annoyed with you, but the decent thing to do would be to talk to him/her in person first. I refuse to respond to anonymous complaints unless they're of a personal nature where it's understandable that a student wouldn't want to be named. Either way I'd leave out what your family think as you're an adult now and are preparing for the real world, it won't be taken seriously if it looks like you ran to your parents/guardians.

    I think you could possibly prevent your work from being used at all without consent though, as it's your intellectual property. You could look into that, although it may not apply to student work. Not sure.

    My advice is to work hard on assignments and begin work as soon as they're set and seek advice from the professor long before the due date (asking for advice last minute tends to irritate most people). This way you at least show that you are working hard even if the result isn't strong.

    Good luck 👍
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    The difference between being a student and being an employee is that a student is still learning and it's the role of a teacher to guide and encourage, not to bully and humiliate. As an employee, you exchange your labour for a salary, so it's reasonable to expect that you do the job properly.
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    Many present cases are pleased to involve theselves in this work They areodd!
    (Original post by emmyloo22)
    I'm taking an upper level (but introductory) cartography/GIS class this semester, and I am concerned about something my professor has written in his syllabus.

    It says, and I quote: "Any map you turn in must be cartographically perfect. After a few weeks in this class, you should have learned how to make a great map. Poorly constructed maps will be displayed each week for the rest of the class to critique, with your name prominently mentioned. They will also be shown in future semesters as examples of 'bad' maps."

    My family and I think that this is BEYOND inappropriate. I've had professors anonymously post examples of good and bad work. I have also had professors ask my permission to use my work as examples in future classes -- always with the promise of my name being removed. This is over the top though. I cannot believe that my university would allow a professor to publicly name and shame a student for imperfect work. What do you guys think? The more I think about it, the angrier I get. I want to report this to the department head, but at the same time, I'm worried about pissing this guy off.
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    Everyone's at university to learn. This professor/lecturer is setting too high of an achievement to achieve. The learning process is all about *possibly* getting things wrong, and trying again until you're good at the subject you're doing. No one can get a perfect mark straight away!
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    I would imagine that the prof can teach his lectures in almost any way he likes, as long as it produces results. So the university may not have jurisdiction over this kind of teaching method. I'm not 100% sure on this, but i would guess so.
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    If its people that clearly haven't done the work, or can't be bothered to put in the effort then I totally agree.

    If its people that genuinely lack the skills and struggle with the work, then I don't agree.

    Kind of hard to differentiate between the two so its really not the best idea.
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    If this is not a troll post and the Uni is based in the UK, then what the so-called "proff" is doing is a serious breach of regulations and humiliation, bullying, and intimidation of weaker individuals. Let's put it this way, Lecturers are under pressure to get students to pass but they don't care if you fail or pass because as an adult it's up to you to pass and the University still gets its fees, that's all they are interested in, making money, like any other business. If it carries on after your student union has dealt with it, write to the Dean, beleieve me, the prof will **** their pants.
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    Just as another retort, ask the "prof" how they got their professor qualification? Guess what, their isn't one. It's usually a given title by fellow peers who are at Doctoral level.
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    Technology proved the three groups and one girl are the best for this work. Thanks to the pillow and masters who played a rule in this.
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    I don't see anything wrong. If you submit any work, you should be able to defend it in front of your peers. I respect that prof.

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    (Original post by Cisco Kid)
    Just as another retort, ask the "prof" how they got their professor qualification? Guess what, their isn't one. It's usually a given title by fellow peers who are at Doctoral level.
    In the UK, "Professor" is a job title and not a qualification. They're called "Professor" because they got a job as a Professor.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    In the UK, "Professor" is a job title and not a qualification. They're called "Professor" because they got a job as a Professor.
    You obviously couldn't understand what i have stated.
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    (Original post by Original music)
    Hi

    University is training for the workplace, where the equality act 2010 and endless company policies protect individuals from casual, bad behaviour. If this happened in the workplace it would be deemed inappropriate and training would follow.

    Unfortunately there are individuals everywhere that do innappropriate things, and those that do not seek resolution to inappropriate behaviour. What is important is that if it makes you feel uncomfortable, you are entitled to seek resolution.

    If you were victimised for complaining in the workplace, the inviduals involved would likely be subject to an equal opportunities policy, and or company policies. In addition to this, all teachers are employees, and therefore are themselves trained, and protected themselves from this behaviour, therefore it is impossible that they would not know about this, fact.

    You can clarify all that I have written through basic research from government and legal/acas websites.

    I hope this helps
    You are assuming OP is 1) not trolling and 2) in the UK.
    They made one post on TSR and then disappeared...
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    This sounds like a pretty cool teaching method.


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    (Original post by Cisco Kid)
    You obviously couldn't understand what i have stated.
    You were suggesting that the OP uses the facts I stated as a jibe. Unfortunately as everyone knows those facts, it's a bit limp and not exactly likely to strike fear into his heart about the OP's rapier wit or intellectual superiority.

    I say again, this would be sorted out in about five minutes flat if genuine and taken to the Student Union. No UK uni would countenance or endorse the alleged behaviour - it would be student recruiting poison.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    You were suggesting that the OP uses the facts I stated as a jibe. Unfortunately as everyone knows those facts, it's a bit limp and not exactly likely to strike fear into his heart about the OP's rapier wit or intellectual superiority.

    I say again, this would be sorted out in about five minutes flat if genuine and taken to the Student Union. No UK uni would countenance or endorse the alleged behaviour - it would be student recruiting poison.
    I agree, the Student Union is first port of call. From my experience though they are too scared of upsetting the applecart and i raised it to the very top.
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    what a ****
 
 
 
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