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    How to not live on the typical student diet of super noodles and takeouts, and it got me wondering about student-y recipes that can be done easily and on the cheap, and I thought it would be nice if we had a discussion thread on here by which to share them??? If you've thought of any recipes or cooking hacks since moving to Uni (example: in a pinch, a wine bottle doubles as a rolling pin), I'd love to hear them!
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    (Original post by JazzB)
    How to not live on the typical student diet of super noodles and takeouts, and it got me wondering about student-y recipes that can be done easily and on the cheap, and I thought it would be nice if we had a discussion thread on here by which to share them??? If you've thought of any recipes or cooking hacks since moving to Uni (example: in a pinch, a wine bottle doubles as a rolling pin), I'd love to hear them!
    To be totally honest with you, I don't know anyone who eats the stereotypical supernoodles, and takeaway food is not cheap! If you can afford takeaway, you can definitely afford to cook a decent meal.

    Curries are super easy and cheap to cook, you can either buy a jar or use tinned tomatoes and add your own spices. If you do half chicken and half veg it also cuts the cost, or just veg! Bulk-making and freezing meals is also really useful, especially for days when you really can't be bothered to cook. Also, make your own pasta sauces with tinned tomatoes and veg. I tend to just make whatever I can with what I have in the cupboards, using recipes is difficult because you then have to have the right ingredients in. If you're not sure whether things go together, google them and see if any recipes come up!

    On a side note, and possibly the least student-y thing, baked camembert with chips and baked broccoli is the best to share as a house.
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    Yes, it's always can't cook, won't cook with students. For some reason they seem to prefer blowing their money on expensive ready meals and takeaways rather than putting in a bit of effort and making things themselves.
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    i'm a sickeningly **** cook but it's also sickeningly easy to live cheaply and healthy, shop at aldi, don't buy junk food, enjoy

    get a slow cooker
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    Just plan your meals tbh, figure out the ingredients, buy them, then make time and put in the effort to cook.

    The last part is the biggest problem, if you've got a lot of stuff to do you just can't make time and even if you can you just might not be feeling like putting the effort in to make a meal from scratch.

    For recipes spag bol is really cheap and fairly easy to make, same goes for curry although it has quite a high start-up cost because of all the spices, salmon's a good shout for a medium sized meal just have something on the side.
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    Following! Interesting thread
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    Dal is always a good one, I make some sort of dal at least once a week! Lentils are super cheap, don't go off and are really healthy. Get some good spices- it's pricey to start with (I've just spent £21 restocking my spices, but that's because my diet is about 70% Indian/Asian so I get through it like no one's business, you definitely don't have to spend THIS much ), but spices last an age so it's definitely worth it. Also things like chilli, pies, homemade veggie burgers, etc.

    TBH, I will reiterate what others have said. It's all about the planning. I sit down on a Sunday morning, go through my recipe books, and see what I fancy before writing a list of ingredients I don't already have and then buy them. Cook in bulk, plan your meals for the week, stick to a strict shopping list. I'm a vegan so find that eating well is cheaper (and I actually eat better than all seven of my housemates!), but even if you're not, it's still possible to eat healthily on a student budget. It's all about the planning!

    Good luck!
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    I've save a lot of money on shopping, normally spending an average of £8 a week. These are some things I've found useful:

    - Shop weekly at somewhere cheap (e.g. Aldi/Lidl)
    - Cook in bulk and freeze
    - Look at prices per gram (e.g. loose carrots will tend be cheaper than bagged carrots per 100g)
    - Don't be tempted by up-spending deals (e.g. don't buy three for two bacon if you aren't going to be able/or want to consume it before it expires)
    - If you live with hungry flatmates, label your food
    - Plan all your meals for the week
    - Meals that can be converted work well (e.g. making bean goulash with tortillas can become posh beans on toast, remove the paprika and add some basil and it is almost vegetarian bolognaise, add chili with the paprika and it becomes chilli)
    - Ask to use spices from your parents/guardians/flatmates (saves you spending £2 on a pot of spice you'll use one and never again)
    - Eat loads of legumes and pulses (kidney, butter, navy, chickpeas, lentils), significantly cheaper than meat

    ---

    General recipes I'd recommend:

    Mixed bean goulash (can be converted into loads of other dishes, you can split the cost of buying the extras by getting your flatmates to chip in for a pound or two)

    Carrot, cumin and coriander burgers (replace fresh herbs with dried, another good one to split the cost with)

    Leek soup (most recipes are full of unnecessary crap, this a version I found in a book at home for three portions):

    700g leeks
    1tbsp olive oil
    1tbsp butter
    Salt and ground pepper

    1. Fan the leeks but cutting down the centre, wash under a tap to remove any grit.
    2. Cut leeks into little circles, about 1.5cm long.
    3. Place olive oil and butter into a pan on the stove at medium heat.
    4. Put the kettle on boil.
    5. Add leeks to the pan and toss to coat.
    6. Add pepper and toss again.
    7. Leave the lid on and steam until glossy, if they start to catch the bottom of the pan then add a lbit of water.
    8. Add about 1.5l of the water that was boiled in the kettle along with some salt.
    9. Bring to boil then immediately lower the heat, leaving it to simmer uncovered.
    10. After 15 minutes, set aside to cool, liquidise or leave chunky.

    ----

    Anything by Jack Monroe tends to go down well, I know this is a bit scatterbrain but I hope it helps
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    do what you can to bulk up meals with cheap ingredients

    e.g. breadcrumbs in meatballs, carrot chopped small in a bolognese, various veg/tinned tomatoes in a chilli
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    I eat A LOT. Luckily I have a wage to be able to afford it, but I still like to save money. What I do is by the biggest bag of whey protein usually 5kg for around £45. 2 scoops of that, with 50g of blended oats with water or milk. Keeps me full for a good 2-3 hours. And costs around £1 a day.
 
 
 
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