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Am I just too thick and a loser to even try GEM (graduate entry medicine) ?? Watch

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    I'm studying a bsc with hons in adult nursing and was thinking if it's possible to enter a GEM course after I graduate in 3 years. I did gcses but my grades were terrible basically most highest grades were Cs. I did a levels for a bit and managed to get one A level grade C in film studies.. i then did a BTEC in health and social care and got a DDM (distinction, distinction, merit) grade. I'll do my best and if needs be I'll retake. Im just thinking whether or not I'm a loser and there's no point in thinking ahead because I won't even enter or do you think there's a possibility?
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    There's a lot of GEM courses which don't consider any qualifications outside of your degree. So it doesn't matter what your GCSEs or A-levels are when applying to those universities. Nursing is a good place to start for GEM as you will have got a fantastic head start on the work experience front and knowing the role of Doctors.

    GEM is absolutely a possibility for you
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    I have had a number of students who have done medicine as GEM students after doing pharmacy: My view would be:-

    1. From what I have seen first hand both as a medical student of the training in nursing (albeit a few years go), AND subsequently, as a pharmacology student, of the training in pharmacy:

    The amount of exposure to patients and hands-on clinical exposure is far greater in nursing than in pharmacy (except for hospital pharmacists), the role of a pharmacist, in general, is one of simple primary care although they are taught some very basic info of "medicine" in what they call "-cology", whereas in nursing, there is formal teaching of and clinical exposure to the various specialties in medicine, surgery and midwifery. This is not to put pharmacists down, rather it is out of necessity a purely primary care role of the simplest medical conditions; (and in some cases, has been degraded by an outlook from a business-oriented viewpoint). In my view, if pharmacists can do medicine, nurses can, too.

    2. There are several medical schools that take a certain minimum number of GEM applicants each year, so you are not out of the equation.

    3. Your title of this post is asking if you are "thick"? Not everyone who does medicine successfully has the IQ approaching that of Mr Magdi Yakub or of Bill Gates - medicine requires other qualities that might make you shine. In fact when I was doing my A levels, we had a short speech from a young qualified doctor and he said that in medicine, the most important thing is common sense (there was no such thing as work experience then!), and this turned out to be so true when I trained in medicine. (your poor grades at GCSE and A level might be because of immaturity, lack of motivation, a poor style of learning OR some other factor).

    I would say resolve, determination, one-mindedness, a balanced outlook to life, a logical approach to problem-solving and a passion for medicine will make you reach your goal.

    Thanks, Mukesh (ex-medic)
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    (Original post by Maggie12345)
    I'm studying a bsc with hons in adult nursing and was thinking if it's possible to enter a GEM course after I graduate in 3 years. I did gcses but my grades were terrible basically most highest grades were Cs. I did a levels for a bit and managed to get one A level grade C in film studies.. i then did a BTEC in health and social care and got a DDM (distinction, distinction, merit) grade. I'll do my best and if needs be I'll retake. Im just thinking whether or not I'm a loser and there's no point in thinking ahead because I won't even enter or do you think there's a possibility?
    Yes you can do it. I am a registered nurse working within critical care outreach and i am currently starting the process of applying for GEM and undergrad. at 26 im an older applicant and didnt do well at school but as long as you study hard in your degree and achieve a 2:1 or about you will qualify for warwick, newcastle, swansea and nottingham, maybe more but cant remeber. But GEM is very competative so broaden your search by looking at undergratue too.

    Romy
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    Hi I was just wondering if anybody else has experienced a negative reception upon announcing that they are applying for graduate entry medicine as a Nurse?. I had the prospect of becoming a Doctor mentioned to me by one of my senior lecturers whilst studying in my 1st year of BSc Nursing, I am applying for 2018 entry with a predicted 1st and 1 year experience working in ITU. I have since mentioned my plans and I feel that I have been almost guilt tripped into staying in Nursing, lecturers have said, because my fees have been paid by the NHS bursary scheme that I owe it to the NHS to stay working for them. I do not agree with his view and frankly, it has motivated me all the more to apply.
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    (Original post by ndr20)
    Hi I was just wondering if anybody else has experienced a negative reception upon announcing that they are applying for graduate entry medicine as a Nurse?. I had the prospect of becoming a Doctor mentioned to me by one of my senior lecturers whilst studying in my 1st year of BSc Nursing, I am applying for 2018 entry with a predicted 1st and 1 year experience working in ITU. I have since mentioned my plans and I feel that I have been almost guilt tripped into staying in Nursing, lecturers have said, because my fees have been paid by the NHS bursary scheme that I owe it to the NHS to stay working for them. I do not agree with his view and frankly, it has motivated me all the more to apply.
    I actually received nothing but overwhleming positivity. But that may be because I had been qualified for a couple of years when I decided to apply. I still get a lot of positivity from all branches (medicine/nursing etc) when the topic comes up now.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I actually received nothing but overwhleming positivity. But that may be because I had been qualified for a couple of years when I decided to apply. I still get a lot of positivity from all branches (medicine/nursing etc) when the topic comes up now.
    This is refreshing and motivating. I have received lots of encouragement from both nurses and doctors throughout my practice placements it's just in University and only from an odd few people. Hope medicine is going well for you.
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    (Original post by ndr20)
    This is refreshing and motivating. I have received lots of encouragement from both nurses and doctors throughout my practice placements it's just in University and only from an odd few people. Hope medicine is going well for you.
    You're not the first to do so, and you won't be the last. Do what is right for you
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    (Original post by ndr20)
    Hi I was just wondering if anybody else has experienced a negative reception upon announcing that they are applying for graduate entry medicine as a Nurse?. I had the prospect of becoming a Doctor mentioned to me by one of my senior lecturers whilst studying in my 1st year of BSc Nursing, I am applying for 2018 entry with a predicted 1st and 1 year experience working in ITU. I have since mentioned my plans and I feel that I have been almost guilt tripped into staying in Nursing, lecturers have said, because my fees have been paid by the NHS bursary scheme that I owe it to the NHS to stay working for them. I do not agree with his view and frankly, it has motivated me all the more to apply.
    You do not owe anyone anything! IF you think you can do and get in, then do it.
    I'm in a similar boat (Still in my studies, albeit L7 pre reg). SO I'm keeping my mouth shut about my plans for medicine, even though I'm applying for 2018 entry and won't be an NHS nurse if all goes to plan..
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    It's so frustrating!. I'm going to do it regardless, but it annoys me that theres this hush tone to it all. If I was studying a non-vocational degree with aspirations for medicine, I'm sure it would be met with nothing but positivity. I hope all goes well for you xx
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    (Original post by ndr20)
    It's so frustrating!. I'm going to do it regardless, but it annoys me that theres this hush tone to it all. If I was studying a non-vocational degree with aspirations for medicine, I'm sure it would be met with nothing but positivity. I hope all goes well for you xx
    Agreed.
    Especially if you will have a years experience in critical care. I've been told and agree with the fact that studying nursing will make me a better doctor when I get it and you should see it that way too. Clinical experience is what it's all about! So ignore the doubters and get revising for the GAMSAT eh :P
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    Yes I agree, I've said in a previous post that the former nurses, turned doctors are often better doctors. At least, the ones I've met anyway. Ha! no GAMSAT for me, UKCAT should be fun though..
 
 
 
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