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    (Original post by notnek)
    Yes that's correct.

    It's useful for questions with diagrams to check if your answer makes sense (although be careful since diagrams aren't always drawn to scale) : AB looks like it's a similar length to EF so the answer 8.2 looks fine.

    If for example you got something like 20cm for EF then this would seem a bit odd so it would be worth double checking your working to see if you made a mistake.
    ok and thanks for giving me a useful tip!
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    Hey can I get a bit of help in answering this question?
    Name:  Eton College King's Scholarship Examination 2008 - Google Chrome 17_03_2017 17_40_43.png
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    (Original post by confuzzedsoul)
    Hey can I get a bit of help in answering this question?
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    Please post your working out or your initial thoughts, even if it's just 'I don't know'. With Maths, you learn more by attempting stuff and going 'okay I understand his bit, but not sure where to go from here' etc.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Please post your working out or your initial thoughts, even if it's just 'I don't know'. With Maths, you learn more by attempting stuff and going 'okay I understand his bit, but not sure where to go from here' etc.
    I have no where to start, all I know the radius is root two
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    (Original post by confuzzedsoul)
    I have no where to start, all I know the radius is root two
    Here's a way you could start: connect the centres of the four smaller circles. What shape do you get?
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    (Original post by confuzzedsoul)
    Hey can I get a bit of help in answering this question?
    Name:  Eton College King's Scholarship Examination 2008 - Google Chrome 17_03_2017 17_40_43.png
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    notnek can help you with this
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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    Here's a way you could start: connect the centres of the four smaller circles. What shape do you get?
    you get a square with side lengths 2 root 2
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    (Original post by confuzzedsoul)
    you get a square with side lengths 2 root 2
    Make the diagonal of that square, what is it's length?
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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    Make the diagonal of that square, what is it's length?
    The length is 4 and ohh I see now, wow it seems so easy
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    why is it x x 16(x 16) 5 though i have the same question and im ab it confused
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    (Original post by whatineedishelp)
    why is it x x 16(x 16) 5 though i have the same question and im ab it confused
    It's hard to know what you're talking about. What was the original question?
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    (Original post by NothingButWaleed)
    I had this question for my term test. Okay so we need to find out how much rain there was in January but we don't know so let rain of January be "x".
    In february there was 16mm more rain so the expression would be x+16
    In march there was 5mm more rain than in February so the expression would be (x+16)+5.
    Then we know that the total amount of rain was 172 so add all the expressions together..
    x+x+16+(x+16)+5 = 172
    Then rearrange for x and then u would have the answer!
    No ratios needed xD!
    im doing the same question and im a bit confused why is it x+x+16+(x+16)+5
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    (Original post by notnek)
    It's hard to know what you're talking about. What was the original question?
    check below
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    (Original post by whatineedishelp)
    im doing the same question and i'm a bit confused why is it x+x+16+(x+16)+5
    Okay..as i said we don't know how much rain there was in January so lets just call it "x" amount of rain...

    and then we know that In February there was 16mm more rain so the expression would be 16 added to the amount of rain there was in January which was x; hence, giving us the expression x+16 right...

    and then it tells us that in march there was 5mm more rain than in February and if the rain in February was x+16 (the expression we worked out) the amount of rain in march must be (x+16)+5 because there was 5mm more rain...

    It tells us that the total amount of rain was 172mm...so if we add the amount of rain in January, February and in March together we need to get 172mm....so we add all the algebraic expressions like this...x+x+16+(x+16)+5, x meaning the amount of rain in January, x+16 meaning the amount of rain in February, etc...

    And its should equal to 172 so..
    x+x+16+(x+16)+5 = 172

    Now simplify the equation...
    3x + 37 = 172
    = 3x = 135
    = x = 45

    And because we said there was x amount of rain in January and now that we have worked out the value of x..there was 45mm of rain in January

    Hope I helped!
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    thank you
 
 
 
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