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My first PC build - opinions and advice appreciated! Watch

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    Hello,

    After months of saving I finally have enough money to begin my first ever computer build. I've done my research, and drawn up a draft parts list but I'm a bit wary of jumping straight into ordering parts in case I've got something wrong. I would therefore be very grateful for any opinions and advice relating to my proposed parts, particularly any potential compatibility issues. My budget is quite tight at around £500, but I only need it to be powerful enough for web searching, 1080p video streaming and some retro gaming (including games like The Witcher and Elder Scrolls Morrowind).

    Anyway, without further ado, here's is my draft parts list:


    Gigabyte H110M-S2H Micro ATX Motherboard

    Zotac GeForce GTX 1050 2 GB Mini Graphics Card

    Intel Core i3 6100 Skylake Dual-Core 3.7

    WD Blue 1TB Desktop Hard Disk Drive

    Aerocool Integrator 500W 12cm Power Supply Unit

    Cooler Master Hyper TX3i CPU Cooler

    Corsair Vengeance LPX 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4 2400 Mhz RAM

    Netgear RangeMax WPN511 Wireless PC Card

    Aerocool V3 X Advance


    Thanks for your help!
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    cpu?
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    Use Pcpartpicker, It checks for compatibility and gives an average price
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    Few things really:

    1) You're missing a processor :lol:
    2) A GTX 1050 is overkill if the most strenuous task you're going to place on your card is a bit of retro gaming. Even a GTX 660 would do the job, that card can run even last-gen games at max settings with no lag whatsoever.
    3) Have you considered installing an SSD as your main drive? They're much more expensive than a standard HDD but the performance boost is well worth it if you put Windows and all your programs and games on it. You might only need a 256gb SSD for all that, then you can also have a HDD installed on which you can store general files like music, videos, work, downloads and anything else that basically isn't a program. SSDs dramatically improve load times and generally don't slow down over time.
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    Hi, for a similar budget I just quickly built a vastly superior PC in terms of GPU performance.

    https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/27MMyf

    has a 470 instead of the 1050. That being said, if gaming isn't really a big thing at all for you then you could be served well by buying a much cheaper GPU and like mentioned above, an SSD as the main drive over a HDD.
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    This seems great for what you want with in built redundancies.
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    Given that you're not looking for a particularly powerful machine, you could scale back on the GPU.

    My PC originally cost about £300 and, although not as powerful as what you've selected in some respects, performs browsing and video playback fine. I've upgraded certain bits of it over time, but I'm using a cheap graphics card (AMD R7 240) which works fine, even for reasonably modern games (although not on full settings, of course)

    I also have an AMD processor (this one: https://www.amazon.co.uk/AMD-FX6300-...=amd+processor) which is cheaper and almost certainly faster than the one you've selected, but it is more power hungry - this is not an issue though as you've got a fairly decent PSU that will cope with it. This may not be compatible with the motherboard you've selected, though.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Few things really:

    1) You're missing a processor :lol:
    2) A GTX 1050 is overkill if the most strenuous task you're going to place on your card is a bit of retro gaming. Even a GTX 660 would do the job, that card can run even last-gen games at max settings with no lag whatsoever.
    3) Have you considered installing an SSD as your main drive? They're much more expensive than a standard HDD but the performance boost is well worth it if you put Windows and all your programs and games on it. You might only need a 256gb SSD for all that, then you can also have a HDD installed on which you can store general files like music, videos, work, downloads and anything else that basically isn't a program. SSDs dramatically improve load times and generally don't slow down over time.
    Whoops haha The CPU I'm currently intending to use is an Intel i3 6100

    When I say retro gaming I'm including titles like the original Witcher and Elder Scrolls Morrowind so, with that in mind, do you still think the GTX 1050 would be overkill?

    I have considered getting a SSD instead of a mechanical drive, but the price and lack of storage put me off. I will reconsider based on what you've told me though.

    Thank you.
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      (Original post by WoodyMKC)
      Few things really:

      1) You're missing a processor :lol:
      2) A GTX 1050 is overkill if the most strenuous task you're going to place on your card is a bit of retro gaming. Even a GTX 660 would do the job, that card can run even last-gen games at max settings with no lag whatsoever.
      3) Have you considered installing an SSD as your main drive? They're much more expensive than a standard HDD but the performance boost is well worth it if you put Windows and all your programs and games on it. You might only need a 256gb SSD for all that, then you can also have a HDD installed on which you can store general files like music, videos, work, downloads and anything else that basically isn't a program. SSDs dramatically improve load times and generally don't slow down over time.
      This. My main desktop machine is a 9-year-old VAIO all-in-one with some archaic Geforce in it. Plays UT a ****en treat though.

      Spoiler:
      Show
      Just a shame Minecraft borks it :getmecoat:
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      (Original post by Tootles)
      This. My main desktop machine is a 9-year-old VAIO all-in-one with some archaic Geforce in it. Plays UT a ****en treat though.

      Spoiler:
      Show

      Just a shame Minecraft borks it :getmecoat:
      As I explained though, I want to be able to play titles like the original Witcher and Elder Scrolls Morrowind on it. Sorry, I should have been more specific.
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      (Original post by LilLilly)
      Whoops haha The CPU I'm currently intending to use is an Intel i3 6100

      When I say retro gaming I'm including titles like the original Witcher and Elder Scrolls Oblivion, so with that in mind do you still think the GTX 1050 would be overkill?

      I have considered getting a SSD instead of a mechanical drive, but the price and lack of storage put me off. I will reconsider based on what you've told me though.

      Thank you.
      Ahh, okay... well, even though those games are about 10 years old, no way I'd class them as retro :rofl: Even PS2 isn't quite "retro" yet. The difference between a GTX 660 and a 1050 is gonna be about 100 quid, for 10 year old games a 660 would run them on max settings absolutely no problem so I'd go for that really. Even a GTX 460 would allow you to pretty much max out on 10 year old games and you can pick those up for about 50 quid these days, if you're really looking to save some cash.

      If you're likely to get some newer games soon then I'd definitely go for something better though, but even then I'd be looking at a 960 as opposed to a 1050 since it's quite a bit cheaper and does similarly well in benchmarks.

      Yeah, as I said they're costly but worth if IMO. If it's just old games you're sticking to then they're not gonna take up a huge deal of space and as I said, the SSD would just be for your Windows files, programs and games, then install a HDD as a storage drive for everything else since those obviously won't affect your loading times when opened.
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      (Original post by LilLilly)
      As I explained though, I want to be able to play titles like the original Witcher and Elder Scrolls Morrowind on it. Sorry, I should have been more specific.
      Those games are pretty damn old (Witch is 2008 I think) so even the most potato of cards nowadays could max them easily. Tbh you couldn't go wrong with a 1050 or a 460.

      (Original post by WoodyMKC)
      .
      The 1050 is cheaper than the 960 brand new believe it or not! So really at this point the 900 series shouldn't really be considered.
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      (Original post by 0xFFFFail)
      The 1050 is cheaper than the 960 brand new believe it or not! So really at this point the 900 series shouldn't really be considered.
      Ohhhh yeah, probably should have mentioned, if you're buying new then yeah, the 1050 would be cheaper. Pre-owned though, the 960 would be cheaper, albeit probably more worn. I bought a pre-owned 460 several years back now though and it only packed in last year, so it lasted me a good 6-7 years with regular use
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      (Original post by WoodyMKC)
      Ahh, okay... well, even though those games are about 10 years old, no way I'd class them as retro :rofl: Even PS2 isn't quite "retro" yet. The difference between a GTX 660 and a 1050 is gonna be about 100 quid, for 10 year old games a 660 would run them on max settings absolutely no problem so I'd go for that really. Even a GTX 460 would allow you to pretty much max out on 10 year old games and you can pick those up for about 50 quid these days, if you're really looking to save some cash.

      If you're likely to get some newer games soon then I'd definitely go for something better though, but even then I'd be looking at a 960 as opposed to a 1050 since it's quite a bit cheaper and does similarly well in benchmarks.

      Yeah, as I said they're costly but worth if IMO. If it's just old games you're sticking to then they're not gonna take up a huge deal of space and as I said, the SSD would just be for your Windows files, programs and games, then install a HDD as a storage drive for everything else since those obviously won't affect your loading times when opened.
      Haha well I was only 7 years old when they were released so they seem retro to me

      I have a PS4 Pro for modern games, so I'm unlikely to play modern games on my PC (not that I wouldn't like to, but the cost of playing on medium settings at a decent frame rate seems beyond my budget). Based on what you've told me I think I'm going to go for the 660 and then use the savings on the GPU towards an SSD instead of the mechanical drive.

      Thanks ever so much for your advice, you are most kind
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      (Original post by WoodyMKC)
      Ohhhh yeah, probably should have mentioned, if you're buying new then yeah, the 1050 would be cheaper. Pre-owned though, the 960 would be cheaper, albeit probably more worn. I bought a pre-owned 460 several years back now though and it only packed in last year, so it lasted me a good 6-7 years with regular use
      bloody hell you hit the lottery O.O
      personally wouldn't ever buy used CPU/GPU due to the fact that they don' track mileage! So I don't know how heavily abused they've been.
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      bump
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      (Original post by LilLilly)
      bump
      What information are you hoping to get beyond what has been given?

      I don't mean that unkindly, I just don't know what you are asking.
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      (Original post by ByronicHero)
      What information are you hoping to get beyond what has been given?

      I don't mean that unkindly, I just don't know what you are asking.
      I was just looking for a few more opinions really. The GPU issue has confused me a little because people were initially saying that my GPU was overkill for what I wanted my PC for, but then I clarified what I meant by retro gaming and that seemed to make a difference. In addition, 0xFFFFail posted a link to a parts list they created which they said was 'vastly superior in terms of GPU'.

      Basically, I think I want clarification on whether I'd be better off going for a more powerful GPU, or going for a cheaper GPU and spending the deifference on an SSD instead of a mechanical drive.
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      (Original post by LilLilly)
      I was just looking for a few more opinions really. The GPU issue has confused me a little because people were initially saying that my GPU was overkill for what I wanted my PC for, but then I clarified what I meant by retro gaming and that seemed to make a difference. In addition, 0xFFFFail posted a link to a parts list they created which they said was 'vastly superior in terms of GPU'.

      Basically, I think I want clarification on whether I'd be better off going for a more powerful GPU, or going for a cheaper GPU and spending the deifference on an SSD instead of a mechanical drive.
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      Well, I don't think you will need the after market cooler so either way you can remove that. Your motherboard will, I think, down-regulate your RAM to 2133 but that's not a huge deal. The 470 will be more than you will need to play even most modern games on okay settings. An SSD is definitely a good inclusion - I personally only use SSD at the moment. It certainly isn't a necessity though.

      If I were you, and assuming your budget is fairly strict, I would get the better GPU in order to future proof yourself a little more. You can always buy and install an SSD down the line if you want to (though certainly it is easier at the start). If you don't think you need the extra gaming performance, I think it makes sense to just get the SSD and not have to worry about fiddling with it for a while.

      I assume you already have an operating system, or the capacity to "obtain" one?
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      (Original post by ByronicHero)
      Well, I don't think you will need the after market cooler so either way you can remove that. Your motherboard will, I think, down-regulate your RAM to 2133 but that's not a huge deal. The 470 will be more than you will need to play even most modern games on okay settings. An SSD is definitely a good inclusion - I personally only use SSD at the moment. It certainly isn't a necessity though.

      If I were you, and assuming your budget is fairly strict, I would get the better GPU in order to future proof yourself a little more. You can always buy and install an SSD down the line if you want to (though certainly it is easier at the start). If you don't think you need the extra gaming performance, I think it makes sense to just get the SSD and not have to worry about fiddling with it for a while.

      I assume you already have an operating system, or the capacity to "obtain" one?
      So the fans on PSU and GPU will be enough?

      Oh really, do you think it would be worth paying the little bit extra for the Asus H110-PLUS ATX LGA1151 Motherboard so I can get the most out of my RAM?

      I think I will go with the 470 and an SSD, because I can't see that I'll want to play modern games on it because I just got a PS4 pro for Christmas.

      Thanks very much for your help
     
     
     
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