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    Please help, I don't understand how to answer the 10 and 25 mark questions for AQA Gov & Pol Unit 1 & 2. How much evidence do I need to include & how many points are needed? My teacher said I need to do 3 per side so 8 paragraphs overall including intro & conclusion, does this seem like too much?
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    Hi,

    My teacher tells us that for 10 mark questions we require 2 paragraphs and therefore two arguments. Each argument must have a 'killer example' which is fully explained, linked to the question with dates and figures etc.

    For 25 mark questions we are told to do 2 paragraphs for and 2 against the notion. Each paragraph will once again have a fully explained 'killer fact'. We are told to look out for the word in the question which has been included to weed out the A grade students, for example in GOVP1 topic 1 June 2015 the essay Q was 'Social class remains the main determinant of voting behaviour. Discuss.' In this the word was 'remains' and this concept needed to be dealt with in detail.

    For the essay the introduction and conclusion do not need to be long but they need to link, the conclusion that you make should be suggested in the introduction. I would also suggest using further evidence to your argument in the conclusion.

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by laura_mccormick)
    Hi,

    My teacher tells us that for 10 mark questions we require 2 paragraphs and therefore two arguments. Each argument must have a 'killer example' which is fully explained, linked to the question with dates and figures etc.

    For 25 mark questions we are told to do 2 paragraphs for and 2 against the notion. Each paragraph will once again have a fully explained 'killer fact'. We are told to look out for the word in the question which has been included to weed out the A grade students, for example in GOVP1 topic 1 June 2015 the essay Q was 'Social class remains the main determinant of voting behaviour. Discuss.' In this the word was 'remains' and this concept needed to be dealt with in detail.

    For the essay the introduction and conclusion do not need to be long but they need to link, the conclusion that you make should be suggested in the introduction. I would also suggest using further evidence to your argument in the conclusion.

    Hope this helps
    Thank you very much! I just had a mock on that paper, but didn't discuss the word 'remains' but I wrote about social class & some other factors.
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    (Original post by laura_mccormick)
    Hi,

    My teacher tells us that for 10 mark questions we require 2 paragraphs and therefore two arguments. Each argument must have a 'killer example' which is fully explained, linked to the question with dates and figures etc.

    For 25 mark questions we are told to do 2 paragraphs for and 2 against the notion. Each paragraph will once again have a fully explained 'killer fact'. We are told to look out for the word in the question which has been included to weed out the A grade students, for example in GOVP1 topic 1 June 2015 the essay Q was 'Social class remains the main determinant of voting behaviour. Discuss.' In this the word was 'remains' and this concept needed to be dealt with in detail.

    For the essay the introduction and conclusion do not need to be long but they need to link, the conclusion that you make should be suggested in the introduction. I would also suggest using further evidence to your argument in the conclusion.

    Hope this helps
    Great explanation! Also worth adding it's good practice to define and explain key terms in the question and throw in political vocabulary. Exhaust the use of "legitimacy, authority and mandate". My teacher never liked me putting in extra info in the conclusion but I did, I think it makes a better argument if you finish with a point that makes you're judgement clear rather than just saying your judgement
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    Great explanation! Also worth adding it's good practice to define and explain key terms in the question and throw in political vocabulary. Exhaust the use of "legitimacy, authority and mandate". My teacher never liked me putting in extra info in the conclusion but I did, I think it makes a better argument if you finish with a point that makes you're judgement clear rather than just saying your judgement
    It's a general rule not to include 'new' information in your conclusion. Your conclusion is a summary of everything discussed in the essay above, not to make a comment about another point of argument and not expand on it as you have done on previous points (ie your essay). You can be even penalised for doing this at university level.
 
 
 
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