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Is there any benefit of spending additional year in Scottish Uni? Watch

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    I was looking into this a week or so ago - none of the above gives a definite reason. There must be a strong, law/ reason as to why the entirety of the EU apart from Scotland's neighbouring UK countries are given free tuition. Anyone?
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    Wow.. that's so unfair . I wish i was born in Scotland then everything would be fantastic and would live a easy life. Also scottish get to go to uni at age 17. Dammit!
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    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    I was looking into this a week or so ago - none of the above gives a definite reason. There must be a strong, law/ reason as to why the entirety of the EU apart from Scotland's neighbouring UK countries are given free tuition. Anyone?
    As far as I'm aware, there's a law stating you can't discriminate against other EU countries. So if the UK as a whole offer X tuition fees then EU get X tuition fees. However, within the UK, all the countries control their own education. So if England choose to have 9k tuition fees they need to offer EU 9k tuition fees. If Scotland allocate their budget to allow free tuition, they need to offer EU countries free tuition. However, after that, under the UK umbrella, there's nothing to stop countries discriminating against each other, they control their own budgets as they like.
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    (Original post by kingoz)
    So basically let's say there is a course requires ABB for entry. There is a England Uni offer 3 Years Degree BSc/BEng and there is a Scottish Uni offer 4 Years Degree BSc/BEng. Both uni first year have the same entry requirement (ABB)but the Scottish uni require 1 more year. Is it worth spending that another year for that degree in that particular uni? Would it look much more better in CV/ the degree ? Otherwise it would be pointless of spending another year if you can just get a degree in just 3 year in any England unis. I know there is a direct entry to second year in Scottish uni , but it requires very high proficiency in the field.
    The only real benefit is you get 4 years at uni for the price of 3 (regarding tuition fees only). The first year doesn't count towards the final grade, nor does the second year. So it means you might have more time in the first couple of years to spend on things to improve you CV such as sports/socs/etc, also you've got an extra summer you can use to try get an internship (not to mention the extra year of study might help get you an internship in the first place). Note that if you take away the 4 for price of 3 and the 1st/2nd years not counting, the same points are true for a 4yr MSci/MEng in England, with the added bonus that you'll have a higher level of qualification at the end.

    Also, I guess it depends on the course(and maybe uni). However I think that the extra year allows for more flexibility. Certainly in humanities you'll have the chance to study a mix of courses in the beginning before you specialise, so you can end up coming out with a different degree than you applied for. So in this sense it is an advantage in that you are more flexible in what you might want to study.
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    (Original post by elekro)
    the thing about Scots not studying for free in England makes sense, didn't think of that. I know that there's a kind of rivalry between England and Scotland. Why is that? (or should I not go off topic on this thread and just start another one?)
    Honestly, I'm not 100% sure. Probably for various reasons eg discrimination/suppression of Celtic people/culture, Irish immigrants who were anti-British/English. I think a thread for that question would be better, and you'll get a better answer also as I don't know a great deal about Scottish or English history besides Mel Gibson and face paint.
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    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    I was looking into this a week or so ago - none of the above gives a definite reason. There must be a strong, law/ reason as to why the entirety of the EU apart from Scotland's neighbouring UK countries are given free tuition. Anyone?

    My guess would be (though don't quote me on it) that because education is a devolved Scottish government power. Under EU law Scotland is required to offer free university to EU students because they can't discriminate against other nations but it isn't required for other UK students because although they are prt of the EU Scotland, England, NI and wales are all part of the same nation in regards to their EU membership. With education being devolved it would be the Uk government that would have to cough up the tuition fees for the rest of The UK.
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    As a Scottish student doing a 4 BSc with honours and English friends on my course the only real benefit I can see is having more time to ease into uni. The transition from school to uni can be difficult with a lot more independent work and different styles of teaching and coursework, so having the extra year although it doesn't make much difference to qualification it's definitely not pointless. My friends have said they don't regret coming to Scotland and doing the extra year as it gave them more time to get used to the standard of work expected at university without it having a negative effect on their degree. (Although it was annoying seeing their friends from England graduate a year before them)
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    (Original post by kingoz)
    Wow.. that's so unfair . I wish i was born in Scotland then everything would be fantastic and would live a easy life. Also scottish get to go to uni at age 17. Dammit!
    Well you will get it for free in other EU countries which offer free university (eg Germany I think), they also offer a lot of English taught courses so you don't even need to speak the local language to study at most top EU universities these days.

    Having a 4yr degree in an overseas uni such as those in Europe would look pretty amazing on your CV, especially if you take the time out and learn the local language. I've seen many graduate jobs asking for a second language or preferring one at least. It would show the company that on top of all the skills you get with a degree and university life in general, that you are also able to settle into a new culture and working environment and pick up the language...something to consider.

    Also, a lot of unis there might not be free, but are much cheaper than the UK, eg. <2000 euro a year etc,just read the fine print, eg Ireland offer 'free' university, but the ask for a registration fee of about 2000euro, which is obviously not free university at all.
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    There is no benefical, in fact it's probably opposite for you since you are not from scotland. Which means you have to waste another year as it's just like foundation year in england. There is really no point unless you are from scots then there would of course be a lot of benefits. However, getting a 1st class degree would most likely be easily in scots because you have that extra year to build up the skills needed and that is why most scotland unis are in top ranking.
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    (Original post by andreyz)
    There is no benefical, in fact it's probably opposite for you since you are not from scotland. Which means you have to waste another year as it's just like foundation year in england. There is really no point unless you are from scots then there would of course be a lot of benefits. However, getting a 1st class degree would most likely be easily in scots because you have that extra year to build up the skills needed and that is why most scotland unis are in top ranking.
    year 1 in scotland isn' like a foundation year in England. Foundation years in England are a lot different.

    Also the number of 1st class degrees a university gives out has no bearing on their ranking.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    year 1 in scotland isn' like a foundation year in England. Foundation years in England are a lot different.

    Also the number of 1st class degrees a university gives out has no bearing on their ranking.
    They are a lot different but the point that was trying to be made was that first year has lower entry requirements (like a foundation year would) and it's generally easier from what the students say.

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    (Original post by Captivated)
    They are a lot different but the point that was trying to be made was that first year has lower entry requirements (like a foundation year would) and it's generally easier from what the students say.
    Not really. Foundation year requirements depend on the university's reason for having the foundation year as well as the student applying. Some offer it to those who don't get the grades they want, but often they'll be for students without the traditional requirements (eg mature students who've got work experience, students who have done the wrong A-levels but have good grades etc).

    I found foundation year harder than year 1 tbh. It depends entirely on the student's background. A lot of my friends from foundation didn't make the 60/65% needed to transfer to the course they wanted to and had to stay on the general science route and transfer from year 1 to year 2 instead after getting 60/65% in year 1, so in my experience the foundation was actually harder than the following year.
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    All degrees in the Republic of Ireland last for 4 years. But in Northern Ireland, because it's part of the UK, they last for three.
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    (Original post by markova21)
    All degrees in the Republic of Ireland last for 4 years. But in Northern Ireland, because it's part of the UK, they last for three.
    Most degrees everywhere in the world will tend to be 4years long. UK is one of the few that have 3 year degrees.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Most degrees everywhere in the world will tend to be 4years long. UK is one of the few that have 3 year degrees.
    Would this then make UK degrees more difficult? Because you only have three years to "cram" everything in compared to four years everywhere else? Surely it wouldn't be the other way round, that UK degrees because they are one year less are less academic? I would find that hard to believe, the amount of international students UK universities seem to attract every year.
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    In Scotland they do different qualifications to rest of UK
    In Scotland many people leave school at 17 and a half
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    (Original post by markova21)
    Would this then make UK degrees more difficult? Because you only have three years to "cram" everything in compared to four years everywhere else? Surely it wouldn't be the other way round, that UK degrees because they are one year less are less academic? I would find that hard to believe, the amount of international students UK universities seem to attract every year.
    No, the main reasoning behind it is you will pick a specialist route. In Scotland for example, you might enrol on a History degree, but you'll have free choices to take modules in say economics or a language (you can do it in a 3 year English course, but it is less flexible). So it isn't so much cramming, more focusing specifically on one degree route as opposed to keeping an open path that you'd have in the US for example.

    It isn't uncommon in Scotland (and other similar systems) to graduate in something different than the title you enrolled on. That's generally where the whole major/minor talk comes from, the major suggesting you've taken a majority of courses in one subject, but not exclusively.
 
 
 
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