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    • Thread Starter
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    Hi all

    I'm not too sure if I'm missing something.

    If I am successful in gaining a place on a PGCE for chemistry, and either get a scholarship or bursary (£27,500 or £25,000, both tax free), I will be effectively earning less as a qualified teacher (starting salary ~£23,500, taxable). This situation is similar for other shortage subjects, such as maths and physics.

    This doesn't make sense to me. Why is there an income drop once qualified?

    Any comments welcome :-)

    Samantha
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    I dont know, but yes i found it bizzare. I was in an office and was probably making the most money.
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    (Original post by samanthani)
    Hi all

    I'm not too sure if I'm missing something.

    If I am successful in gaining a place on a PGCE for chemistry, and either get a scholarship or bursary (£27,500 or £25,000, both tax free), I will be effectively earning less as a qualified teacher (starting salary ~£23,500, taxable). This situation is similar for other shortage subjects, such as maths and physics.

    This doesn't make sense to me. Why is there an income drop once qualified?

    Any comments welcome :-)

    Samantha
    High bursaries/scholarships are a desperate move as the Government fails to meet its own recruitment targets year on year. They don't set retention targets so this is not such a priority for them.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    High bursaries/scholarships are a desperate move as the Government fails to meet its own recruitment targets year on year. They don't set retention targets so this is not such a priority for them.
    Yes, it seems a bit of a backward way of doing things - pay a huge amount to get student teachers, but give them little incentive to stay!
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    I certainly agree with all of the above but don't forget that you need to deduct £9000 for your tuition fees.

    Although we are given the option of a student loan (which I have taken out), as a very mature student, I would have preferred to receive the balance of the bursary after taking away the amount for tuition fees - but you have to take out a student loan instead. I intend to pay mine back at the end of the course but I really feel for my younger colleagues who already have big student loan debts from their undergrad day.

    Also, there is the issue of trainees who drop out part way through the course after receiving the bursary for several months and a bonus payment. Ho hum.
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    (Original post by VelmaStaplebot)
    I certainly agree with all of the above but don't forget that you need to deduct £9000 for your tuition fees.

    Although we are given the option of a student loan (which I have taken out), as a very mature student, I would have preferred to receive the balance of the bursary after taking away the amount for tuition fees - but you have to take out a student loan instead. I intend to pay mine back at the end of the course but I really feel for my younger colleagues who already have big student loan debts from their undergrad day.

    Also, there is the issue of trainees who drop out part way through the course after receiving the bursary for several months and a bonus payment. Ho hum.
    Surely as a "very mature" student you'd be better off just paying off the minimum amount based on your salary?

    Even taking the £9000 loan into account, it still seems like a good deal, as the loan is designed to be paid off over a number of years.
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    (Original post by samanthani)
    Surely as a "very mature" student you'd be better off just paying off the minimum amount based on your salary?

    Even taking the £9000 loan into account, it still seems like a good deal, as the loan is designed to be paid off over a number of years.
    You are right and I think the interest is even lower if you pay it back ASAP. And you are right too that it is still a very good deal considering that almost all students end up with massive debts when they are starting work. For other subjects there are no bursaries at all - so whichever way you look at it someone seems to gain while others don't.

    And I could retire before paying it all back - so that's not fair for everyone else.

    Sorry to sound like an old codger - when I did my first degree student grants were still around and tuition fees were minimal, so I think it is much, much harder now for students. Also, the expectation was that you paid any overdraft off as soon as you could (otherwise there was no chance of a mortgage) rather than now - when you are expected to carry round your student debt for decades - admittedly at a highly preferential interest rate. But that's a whole other conversation.
 
 
 
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