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    Has anybody had any previous experience teaching themselves an A level in Italian/French/German/Spanish?

    I'm 24 years old. I've been learning Italian for a year and wanted to really knuckle down and take it seriously. I figured I could either take a GCSE to start then A level after that. I'd also love to study French or German (or both). I have no GCSE's in any language other than English.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    Has anybody had any previous experience teaching themselves an A level in Italian/French/German/Spanish?

    I'm 24 years old. I've been learning Italian for a year and wanted to really knuckle down and take it seriously. I figured I could either take a GCSE to start then A level after that. I'd also love to study French or German (or both). I have no GCSE's in any language other than English.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated
    Get the recommended books by your exam board you're signing up to. Self teaching a language at A-level will be difficult due to a lack of guidance (and also the fact that there isn't much help on the specification to tell you what to cover exactly), so I'd recommend choosing a popular exam board who offer lots of resource (e.g. AQA Spanish).

    Another thing I did whilst self teaching A-level languages was to use Youtube tutorials (there are sooo many). Really helped with pronunciations
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    Has anybody had any previous experience teaching themselves an A level in Italian/French/German/Spanish?

    I'm 24 years old. I've been learning Italian for a year and wanted to really knuckle down and take it seriously. I figured I could either take a GCSE to start then A level after that. I'd also love to study French or German (or both). I have no GCSE's in any language other than English.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated
    It will be particularly challenging for languages, mainly due to the lack of conversation practice. There are loads of websites and resources online for common languages about grammar, sentence structures, vocab, etc. but I would really recommend getting a language buddy for conversation practice. If you have any friends who speak the language that's ideal, if not there are websites online (e.g. italki) which will match you up with a language exchange partner or private tutor
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    You may also find that an A level isn't the best qualification to go for for languages btw - you would probably be better off aiming for one of the official certificates in the language (i.e. their equivalent of IELTS) since this is more internationally recognised and useful in terms of working/ studying abroad in the future
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    You may also find that an A level isn't the best qualification to go for for languages btw - you would probably be better off aiming for one of the official certificates in the language (i.e. their equivalent of IELTS) since this is more internationally recognised and useful in terms of working/ studying abroad in the future
    Really? I have to admit I didn't even think of that!!
    I'm going to be cheeky and ask if you could tell me a bit more?
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    Get the recommended books by your exam board you're signing up to. Self teaching a language at A-level will be difficult due to a lack of guidance (and also the fact that there isn't much help on the specification to tell you what to cover exactly), so I'd recommend choosing a popular exam board who offer lots of resource (e.g. AQA Spanish).

    Another thing I did whilst self teaching A-level languages was to use Youtube tutorials (there are sooo many). Really helped with pronunciations
    I figured that might the case haha!
    I checked Edexcel but then I got so confused with where I would actually go to sit the exam. Nothing's ever easy eh

    Just out of curiosity, what language did you get an A level in?
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    I figured that might the case haha!
    I checked Edexcel but then I got so confused with where I would actually go to sit the exam. Nothing's ever easy eh

    Just out of curiosity, what language did you get an A level in?
    Portuguese and Spanish.
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    Really? I have to admit I didn't even think of that!!
    I'm going to be cheeky and ask if you could tell me a bit more?
    I have to admit I don't know all that much about the official exams for European languages - I'm sure if you google "official Spanish exam" you'll be able to find out what the official language exam is called and where you can take it.

    The issue with A levels is that you need to find a suitable exam centre to take the exams (expensive and may involve trekking across the country...) and that outside the UK no-one knows what language level it means. Also, if you want to enrol on a study program taught in a foreign language or work abroad there, you'll usually need the officially recognised certificate in the language, whereas the A level is only recognised in the UK. Since (I'm guessing...) you're not doing the A level in order to gain UCAS points to go to uni, but instead more for personal satisfaction/ career benefits, the official language exam is much more useful

    Hope that helps! If you've got any questions do let me know (particularly if you feel like learning Chinese...)
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    Portuguese and Spanish.
    Awesome!
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    I have to admit I don't know all that much about the official exams for European languages - I'm sure if you google "official Spanish exam" you'll be able to find out what the official language exam is called and where you can take it.

    The issue with A levels is that you need to find a suitable exam centre to take the exams (expensive and may involve trekking across the country...) and that outside the UK no-one knows what language level it means. Also, if you want to enrol on a study program taught in a foreign language or work abroad there, you'll usually need the officially recognised certificate in the language, whereas the A level is only recognised in the UK. Since (I'm guessing...) you're not doing the A level in order to gain UCAS points to go to uni, but instead more for personal satisfaction/ career benefits, the official language exam is much more useful

    Hope that helps! If you've got any questions do let me know (particularly if you feel like learning Chinese...)
    :adore:
    ThankyouThankyouThankyou!! This really does help!
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    :adore:
    ThankyouThankyouThankyou!! This really does help!
    You're welcome!
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    (Original post by chupa1992)
    Has anybody had any previous experience teaching themselves an A level in Italian/French/German/Spanish?

    I'm 24 years old. I've been learning Italian for a year and wanted to really knuckle down and take it seriously. I figured I could either take a GCSE to start then A level after that. I'd also love to study French or German (or both). I have no GCSE's in any language other than English.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated
    Go for it! Learning another language opens up new worlds and can be intensely fulfilling.

    We have a large number of articles on our site written by tutors about different aspects of language learning. This one is particularly helpful:

    http://www.thetutorpages.com/tutor-a...udiobooks/8481

    Rosetta Stone is one of the most famous self-teaching language programmes, but one of our tutors has also recommended Fluenz as an alternative.

    As Dragonkeeper says, the French or German equivalents of IELTS sound like they may be more useful and relevant for you.

    The article below give quite a good overview of them all:

    http://www.languagelearningportal.co...tificates.html

    Of course, if you decide that a tutor might help (either regularly, or once in a while) you can take a look at our site to search for language tutors in your area:

    http://www.thetutorpages.com/french-tutors

    http://www.thetutorpages.com/german-tutors

    Good luck!

    Emma
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    OP how do you plan on booking the exam centre or doing coursework? Just interested cause I'd like to self-teach an A-level but have no idea how to get assessed.
 
 
 
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