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    Hi,
    So I'm currently trying to formulate a good revision timetable. It's proving trickier than I thought as I'm torn between thinking I'm either setting too many hours or too few. How many hours would prove to be most beneficial per subject on a weekly basis?
    I'm aiming for:
    English Literature: 9
    English Language: 9
    Maths: 7
    RE: A*
    History: A*
    Spanish: A*
    Computer Science: A*
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A (although obviously A* would be even better)
    Physics: A (as above)
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    (Original post by e2014)
    Hi,
    So I'm currently trying to formulate a good revision timetable. It's proving trickier than I thought as I'm torn between thinking I'm either setting too many hours or too few. How many hours would prove to be most beneficial per subject on a weekly basis?
    I'm aiming for:
    English Literature: 9
    English Language: 9
    Maths: 7
    RE: A*
    History: A*
    Spanish: A*
    Computer Science: A*
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A (although obviously A* would be even better)
    Physics: A (as above)
    Those are very realistic ambitions if you put in the hard work. Now, for your question. I don't believe you should be doing too many hours at this stage. You'll burn out as I am sure you've heard many times. I would say it's more important to set small tasks such as "understand empirical formula" as opposed to "study 3 hours".

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    (Original post by Moltenmo)
    Those are very realistic ambitions if you put in the hard work. Now, for your question. I don't believe you should be doing too many hours at this stage. You'll burn out as I am sure you've heard many times. I would say it's more important to set small tasks such as "understand empirical formula" as opposed to "study 3 hours".

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    Yeah, I really understand what you mean. I'm trying to make a timetable because I feel as though it makes me feel much more organised and productive, but at the same time, it feels unrealistic to try to order myself hour by hour day by day and in doing so it feels as though I have no free time at all.
    How do you suggest staying on top of revision and feeling like things are in order without forcing yourself to follow a rigid structure?
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    (Original post by e2014)
    Hi,
    So I'm currently trying to formulate a good revision timetable. It's proving trickier than I thought as I'm torn between thinking I'm either setting too many hours or too few. How many hours would prove to be most beneficial per subject on a weekly basis?
    I'm aiming for:
    English Literature: 9
    English Language: 9
    Maths: 7
    RE: A*
    History: A*
    Spanish: A*
    Computer Science: A*
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A (although obviously A* would be even better)
    Physics: A (as above)
    There aren't really set hours that anyone of us can tell you as it depends on the person. Which subjects do you feel like you struggle with the most? Prioritise them.
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    (Original post by e2014)
    How do you suggest staying on top of revision and feeling like things are in order without forcing yourself to follow a rigid structure?
    Try setting yourself tasks on a weekly basis, e.g. revise x topic from x subject, do y papers for y subject and then you can revise as you feel you have the time but with a deadline as such for the end of the week to keep you motivated.
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    (Original post by e2014)
    Yeah, I really understand what you mean. I'm trying to make a timetable because I feel as though it makes me feel much more organised and productive, but at the same time, it feels unrealistic to try to order myself hour by hour day by day and in doing so it feels as though I have no free time at all.
    How do you suggest staying on top of revision and feeling like things are in order without forcing yourself to follow a rigid structure?
    Following a structure isn't a bad thing. This is how I began off. I think it's a good idea to try and follow a structure and then slowly but surely you will begin to realise that this has become a habit and no longer need this. Check it out!

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    You just really need to do 1 hour 30 mins or more per day of chosen subject(s) and then do homework if needed. But if you have an exam start revising about 3 - 2 weeks early for 2 hours, revise the exam subject and others but gradually increase exam subject each day of about 5-10 minutes. Well thats what i do anyway hahaha
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    Well this looks like GCSE. I got 4 As, 6 Bs and 2Cs when I did almost 90% night before revision. If you're not absolutely useless at school stuff then you probably don't need to obsess over the overall revision structure too much for those targets, so long as you do some.
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    This advice probably goes against all your instincts, but i got 4 a*s and 6 as. For year 10 i mde end of topic revision notes and that was all i needed. Then year 11 until easter, i just revised what i felt like when i felt like it. Try to cover each topic using as wide a variety of materials as possible- it sticks better! Then at y11 easter i planned how i'd spend my 3 weeks ( not 3 months) and reassesed after this how i was doing. Then i put all my exams on a calendar and said eg 16th May am geogrpahy unit 1 pm maths unit 4. So you work it out from easter it terms of when each exam is. My method prevents burnout BUT you need rigid revision from after Easter. Basically, you learn the foundations without seeing it as work so you have more energy to really do it properly come exams. My most productive revision was the last days before an exam, so this worked for me!!!
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    How many hours is largely irrelevant. Getting an A* is generally not going to come about by doing more revision. Getting an A* means you have a better understanding of your knowledge and can apply it better. There's no defined amount of revision you need to do to get a certain grade, nor is it possible to give a blanket number. You need to spend more time on the subjects you are weak at and more time on the subjects you are strong at.

    In general though, with 10 subjects to revise for there's a limit to just how much you can fit in. Unless you want to come home from school and study all evening you'll really struggle to get more than 2 hours of good revision in. Sure there's no reason you couldn't get home and do 5 hours of revision before bed every day but that is neither practical nor fun. 2 hours per evening, Monday to Friday would mean 1 hour per subject. Use the weekend to focus on whatever needs work.

    Of course it never actually works like that though, especially when past papers might be an 1.5 to 2 hours. Do whatever you feel you need to do.
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    It's all up to you It depends on you really,if you think you need to do x amount of hours then do it. Also do more hours on the subjects that you are struggling with. After school you could do 2-3 hours and on the weekends 4-6 hours. But like I said it's really up to you
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    I think you should do a task based system. For example I do triple science and altogether i have 144 topics. I have 15 weeks left for that so that means 9 topics a week should be enough. Just some info: it takes me around an hour per topic so in a week I spend 4 hours on chemistry and physics and 3 in biology.
    In addition Eve Bennet (youtuber who ot 11 A*S) done 3-4 hours per subjest every week
    My goals:
    English lit: 8-9
    English Language:9
    Maths:7-8
    Biology: A*
    Chemistry: A*
    Physics: A*
    Geography: A*
    History: A*
    French: A
    RE: A*
    Social studies: A
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    (Original post by eviebrizzle)
    This advice probably goes against all your instincts, but i got 4 a*s and 6 as. For year 10 i mde end of topic revision notes and that was all i needed. Then year 11 until easter, i just revised what i felt like when i felt like it. Try to cover each topic using as wide a variety of materials as possible- it sticks better! Then at y11 easter i planned how i'd spend my 3 weeks ( not 3 months) and reassesed after this how i was doing. Then i put all my exams on a calendar and said eg 16th May am geogrpahy unit 1 pm maths unit 4. So you work it out from easter it terms of when each exam is. My method prevents burnout BUT you need rigid revision from after Easter. Basically, you learn the foundations without seeing it as work so you have more energy to really do it properly come exams. My most productive revision was the last days before an exam, so this worked for me!!!
    Yes I agree for me the last few days before an exam are the most productive!
 
 
 
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