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    Hi,

    I'm 19 years old and currently doing a marketing apprenticeship. I kind of fell into this job after finishing my alevels because I didn't want to go to university and didn't know what else to do. I'd always liked the idea of doing a distance learning degree but my school constantly tried to talk me out of the idea until eventually I went for a full time job instead.

    My apprenticeship as you can imagine doesn't pay well, I work 8:45 till 17:30 Monday to Friday and my income is still low as I'm on apprentice wage.

    I've also found that my job isn't keeping me stimulated, I get bored and sit practically watching the clock until home time. Whilst marketing is very interesting and there is lots to do, I just don't find myself feeling inspired.

    Mainly, I'm really missing education. I love learning and thought that an apprenticeship would allow me to do that however it seems most of what I have to do is take screenshots and upload them online, to show I can do things rather than actually having to study.

    I'm really considering finding a degree through distance learning in Philosophy/religious studies/ethics as I've studied this as GCSE and Alevel and I love it. This would mean leaving my current job to work part time (on minimum wage though so could probably do way less hours for the same if not a bit more income) and be a student, doing a distance learning degree part time also at home.

    I am totally stuck as I want to do the degree but feel like I will be letting my current employer down and I worry what others will think/say.

    Would really appreciate any advice or comments from people who've perhaps had to make the decision between working full time or quitting and going to uni/distance learning uni.

    I have no idea what to do.
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    Why would you have to leave your current job in order to start part time distance learning?
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    (Original post by Persipan)
    Why would you have to leave your current job in order to start part time distance learning?
    My current job is full time, so all day monday to friday and i just wouldnt have the time and the job im in i woulfnt be able to go part time.
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    (Original post by littlechicklet)
    My current job is full time, so all day monday to friday and i just wouldnt have the time and the job im in i woulfnt be able to go part time.
    I mean, it's up to you, but a lot, lot, lot of OU students study part time alongside full time work. (Including me.)
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    (Original post by Persipan)
    I mean, it's up to you, but a lot, lot, lot of OU students study part time alongside full time work. (Including me.)
    I am aware of that but my job won't let me go part time and I could work part time elsewhere on more money as where I am currently is only apprentice wage.

    Also, my sister works full time and does a OU degree and has said how stressful she has found it so if I can afford to I'd rather work part time and put more effort into my studies.
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    You are taking the "part time" part a bit too literally
    If you have enough time, say in the evening and maybe one full day on the weekend, you should be able to manage 30-60 credits while still keeping your apprenticeship. The money, even if not much, will help. Once you finish the apprenticeship, you could still start studying more credits at once or go full time.
    I manage 60-90 credits level one at OU no problem while holding down a fulltime job and extensive commuting.

    Maybe call OU and see what they think?

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    (Original post by SpaceNomad)
    You are taking the "part time" part a bit too literally
    If you have enough time, say in the evening and maybe one full day on the weekend, you should be able to manage 30-60 credits while still keeping your apprenticeship. The money, even if not much, will help. Once you finish the apprenticeship, you could still start studying more credits at once or go full time.
    I manage 60-90 credits level one at OU no problem while holding down a fulltime job and extensive commuting.

    Maybe call OU and see what they think?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The problem I have with that is it would mean having no time for anything else. By the time I get home at 6pm I'm knackered and the last thing I want to do is study or write an essay. My choice for leaving my job would be that I could get something else, with less hours so I have more time to study, for the same if not more money. Currently I'm on apprentice wage which is 3.75 an hour, whereas anywhere else they'd have to pay me minimum wage which is 5.60
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    Just be sure distance learning really is for you before you quit?

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    (Original post by SpaceNomad)
    Just be sure distance learning really is for you before you quit?

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    Don't worry it's not a decision I'm going to make lightly
 
 
 
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