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Holding myself together until exams are finished Watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Hey all, I don't usually post much on this site at the moment but I was curious as to see how everyone seems to be coping or has any advice for a situation similar to mine. Basically, I've been really depressed the past couple of years (sometimes bordering suicidal) due to deep self-image and personal/interpersonal issues, and I was considering seeking help for it, however I was concerned it would affect my college course performance and references that the college would hand out when I applied to uni. So I've just kept it to myself, relating to a few friends but I've never really sought any professional help.

    It's come to January where I've finally realised I have serious issues in controlling my moods whenever I hear events or read things that remind me of what frustrates me, or on days when I feel really alone I just start to remember stuff I'd rather not, and almost anything sets me into a spiral of a deep-depressive mood, where I end up staying in bed for hours not wanting to get out of it. I've told myself that I'll get my mental wellbeing sorted out after my exams, as anything like CBT would take way too much time and effort at my stage - and I don't want to face the things that really make me feel down when I'm going to be revising for and sitting my A2 exams.

    I'm really struggling at the moment where I don't feel like I have much control over the way I feel now, and it's damaging my relationships with my family, my friends and my partner. All I want to do is keep it together until I've sat my A2 exams, and completely focus on my study. It's really difficult to do that at the moment.

    So I was wondering if you guys have any ideas on what I can do to keep my mental wellbeing stable until the summer? I would really appreciate any helpful advice and ideas from people in a similar situation that have found ways of coping!

    Thank you all
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hey all, I don't usually post much on this site at the moment but I was curious as to see how everyone seems to be coping or has any advice for a situation similar to mine. Basically, I've been really depressed the past couple of years (sometimes bordering suicidal) due to deep self-image and personal/interpersonal issues, and I was considering seeking help for it, however I was concerned it would affect my college course performance and references that the college would hand out when I applied to uni. So I've just kept it to myself, relating to a few friends but I've never really sought any professional help.

    It's come to January where I've finally realised I have serious issues in controlling my moods whenever I hear events or read things that remind me of what frustrates me, or on days when I feel really alone I just start to remember stuff I'd rather not, and almost anything sets me into a spiral of a deep-depressive mood, where I end up staying in bed for hours not wanting to get out of it. I've told myself that I'll get my mental wellbeing sorted out after my exams, as anything like CBT would take way too much time and effort at my stage - and I don't want to face the things that really make me feel down when I'm going to be revising for and sitting my A2 exams.

    I'm really struggling at the moment where I don't feel like I have much control over the way I feel now, and it's damaging my relationships with my family, my friends and my partner. All I want to do is keep it together until I've sat my A2 exams, and completely focus on my study. It's really difficult to do that at the moment.

    So I was wondering if you guys have any ideas on what I can do to keep my mental wellbeing stable until the summer? I would really appreciate any helpful advice and ideas from people in a similar situation that have found ways of coping!

    Thank you all

    Hi there!
    I understand that right now you want to focus on your exams and do well in your A-levels so that you can get into a good university, however I can only tell you based on my own experiences that its very important to prioritise your well-being over your studies. It's not a good idea to keep pushing it back because it does catch up with you, especially with the pressure that university brings. University really does test your character, and your ability to survive in situations that test your social, and academic skills adding the additional financial pressure. Cases of depression are common because it can be a very difficult transition for a lot of people to make. Going in with unresolved or unmanaged problems will only add fuel to the fire.


    I recommend that you seek counselling, hopefully your college provides that whilst just to get that extra support and be able to talk to someone. Your college might also have workshops on how to manage stress and other common problems so maybe ask about that. Do not be concerned about what your university will think, to my knowledge they will not be informed that you have received any type of well-being/counselling support whatsoever. Also you should know that in university they have counselling and mental health support systems that they encourage you to join if you need support therefore they are likely to discriminate against anyone who is suffering with their mental health.

    Overall I really hope that you look after yourself and remember that exams come and go but your mental health is really fragile. University will always be there. You as a person is what will get you through life not the exams you sit. Exams can be retaken and really there are no limits as to what you can do, the only thing that can really limit you is debilitating illness whether it be mental or physical. I don't know you but from the sounds of it you might benefit well from a gap year to focus on getting yourself better and away from all the stress that I know A levels can bring. .

    I hope you do what's best for you
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi there!
    I understand that right now you want to focus on your exams and do well in your A-levels so that you can get into a good university, however I can only tell you based on my own experiences that its very important to prioritise your well-being over your studies. It's not a good idea to keep pushing it back because it does catch up with you, especially with the pressure that university brings. University really does test your character, and your ability to survive in situations that test your social, and academic skills adding the additional financial pressure. Cases of depression are common because it can be a very difficult transition for a lot of people to make. Going in with unresolved or unmanaged problems will only add fuel to the fire.


    I recommend that you seek counselling, hopefully your college provides that whilst just to get that extra support and be able to talk to someone. Your college might also have workshops on how to manage stress and other common problems so maybe ask about that. Do not be concerned about what your university will think, to my knowledge they will not be informed that you have received any type of well-being/counselling support whatsoever. Also you should know that in university they have counselling and mental health support systems that they encourage you to join if you need support therefore they are likely to discriminate against anyone who is suffering with their mental health.

    Overall I really hope that you look after yourself and remember that exams come and go but your mental health is really fragile. University will always be there. You as a person is what will get you through life not the exams you sit. Exams can be retaken and really there are no limits as to what you can do, the only thing that can really limit you is debilitating illness whether it be mental or physical. I don't know you but from the sounds of it you might benefit well from a gap year to focus on getting yourself better and away from all the stress that I know A levels can bring. .

    I hope you do what's best for you
    Thank you for the informative reply. Unfortunately retaking my A Levels is not an option for me as I have already resat AS, due to my first college being an unpleasant experience. All I'm looking for is the ability to focus for 5 months or so - without potential triggers bringing me down or making me sensitive. I can't afford any breakdowns anymore, I've already wasted two years from not putting enough effort as I feel I can do because of them - it's like I've cheated myself, and I want to stop any more damage being done.

    I just need to stop having breakdowns for a while until I have the time to get my mental health sorted. Is it easy to take prescribed medication temporarily from a GP clinic without having to solve the whole problem? Would it affect my study alternatives?
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by KvRs)
    Thank you for the informative reply. Unfortunately retaking my A Levels is not an option for me as I have already resat AS, due to my first college being an unpleasant experience. All I'm looking for is the ability to focus for 5 months or so - without potential triggers bringing me down or making me sensitive. I can't afford any breakdowns anymore, I've already wasted two years from not putting enough effort as I feel I can do because of them - it's like I've cheated myself, and I want to stop any more damage being done.

    I just need to stop having breakdowns for a while until I have the time to get my mental health sorted. Is it easy to take prescribed medication temporarily from a GP clinic without having to solve the whole problem? Would it affect my study alternatives?
    Well, I do sympathise with you because I know how disruptive and distressing triggers are when you're trying to get on with your life. Truth is you're probably going to have to get some type of psychological help to deal with those triggers, they won't just go away because you don't have the time to deal with them. There are lots of self-help resources that you can access on the Internet, also practising things like mindfulness which is based on focusing on the present and not focusing on past experiences might help. Medications, like antidepressants are not really a quick or easy route to go down simply because they take a few weeks sometimes months to actually see an improvement, if there is one and it takes a lot of adapting to e.g. side effects. If one doesn't work, you often need to switch to another one so it's more like a trial and error situation not really a quick fix. However I'm not a professional so if that's really the route you want to go down that it's best to discuss it with your GP.

    In my experience taking up exercise like swimming, yoga, things that are known to relax you and improve well-being do help a lot with managing stress/depression. It will probably help with your overall physical/mental health and make you a bit happier

    btw I understand what you mean, you know you could do better if it were not for the circumstances your in but it's best not to be so hard on yourself because it only adds to the pressure and makes things worse. There are some things that we are just not in control of and you can only do your best to try and manage the situation.
 
 
 
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