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    (Original post by comebackseason)
    As far as I understand in order to qualify for UK domestic student status you have to be a resident in the uk for 3 years prior to the commencement of your degree program
    nah ive looked at the criteria everywhere. there are some exceptions like if you're the child of a refugee, turkish worker, swiss person, that kind of stuff. but nothing to help the people who have been living and paying tax and contributing to the country for 5 years hehehe
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    (Original post by Moura)
    It is unfortunate but your taxes don't just go to university... I would say 5 years of tax doesn't cover the government subsidies of uni... can't you take a citizenship test?
    Yeah I understand that - and that true but I'm sure the £19,000 a year that international students which make up the majority of most top/average universities cover the cost no? If you look at the ratios at some top 10 unis e.g. Bath its 65-70% international, and the remainder being UK so.. And nahh. I've already gone through the process I had detailed emails with all the uni's I applied to and talked to UCAS explained them my situation but to no luck so i guess ill be paying the international fees. fortunately I will have a UK passport in the last year of uni so for my Masters I will be able to get a student loan which is still significant.
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    (Original post by CurryHead)
    I'm an International student from India, and I've been offered admission to a 4 year course in Biochemistry at University College, Oxford. Now I really really want to go, because my country has very limited opportunities for research, but my full four year fees comes up to about 170000 GBP (everything included), which is WAY more than I can possibly afford. Is there any sort of financial assistance available to me? I know there are the Reach and Simon and June Li scholarships, but those are very limited in number. Can anyone help me?

    In England, you are eligible to apply for what the government call a "student loan". This accodates for your tuition fees for the full length of your course, presumably for Oxford this is the full £9,250 per year.
    These fees are not paid off until you begin to earn over £21,000 per year (salary based). When (if) you do, you pay just 6 percent of an excess over that amount. For instance, if you have a salary of £22,000 you would pay 6% of the £1000.
    The best thing to do is contact your university directly or UCAS because they will be able to guide you in the right direction.
    I hope you are able to fulfill your place & dreams. Good Luck!
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    (Original post by Shuttleworth)
    In England, you are eligible to apply for what the government call a "student loan". This accodates for your tuition fees for the full length of your course, presumably for Oxford this is the full £9,250 per year.
    These fees are not paid off until you begin to earn over £21,000 per year (salary based). When (if) you do, you pay just 6 percent of an excess over that amount. For instance, if you have a salary of £22,000 you would pay 6% of the £1000.
    The best thing to do is contact your university directly or UCAS because they will be able to guide you in the right direction.
    I hope you are able to fulfill your place & dreams. Good Luck!
    Isn't that only for home/EU students? I'm Overseas.
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    I'm currently an undergraduate student at Cambridge but I'm a home student so I get student loan to cover the fees etc. Congratulations on your offer, but Oxbridge is not as brilliant as it may seem to you right now and there are many other good universities in India that would be much cheaper for you. It is definitely not worth 1.4 crore rupees, which is an amount that many middle class families earn in a lifetime. The supervision/tutorial system is useful but only if that teaching style suits you. I think you should get in touch with the university for scholarships (however most are just for home students), try and meet with alumnis and open a gofundme account. This is a huge amount to take out a loan for so I think in the case that you don't get much funding from anywhere you should complete your bachelors degree in India and then apply again to Oxford for a place on the masters course if you're still interested. I am studying engineering and I haven't met a single undergraduate who is an international student from India, but there are many masters students. Best of luck with the funding and with whatever course you choose to do, but I would advise you to reconsider Oxford as the degree may not be much better than what you would study in India, especially in terms of difficulty.
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    (Original post by Moura)
    Unfortunately university is subsidised for British students because our parents pay tax and international students have to pay the full fee... it can't really be helped as they bring a lot of money to the university and if the fees were cheaper it might not cover the costs and there would be too many applicants.

    I think there should be commonwealth exceptions though it's pretty unfair after everything we've done...
    It isn't subsidised for British students, otherwise it would be free. There is the government run student loans company, which you get two loans from, one for the uni fees which is now about £9250 per year for British students, and then a maintenance loan for accomodation which is based off your parents income and personal circumstances. University fees are subsidised for Scottish students though.
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    There is a really useful website called The Scholarship Hub, they have all sorts of scholarships including international ones.

    You could also look into getting a sponsorship, large companies may fund your degree if you agree to work for them afterwards. (I have a relative who did this and has been funded from the start of their bachelor's degree all the way through to their doctorate.)

    I'm not really sure what else there is out there that hasn't already been suggested but good luck.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    I wonder if admitting more Chinese to Oxford would be the best way to address that stereotype.
    Surely to do that would only confirm the stereotype?!!
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    5. The Oxford degree likely had contributed very little to their political success whatever their background.

    Wilson came from a political family. Lee's family was never actually poor. Turnbull didn't come from a poor family. May was at least middle class.
    I note the precise proportions at the various universities which you cite.

    I mention no particular ways for Oxford to enrich itself because that was not essentially relevant to my argument. But others might suggest (though I do not endorse all of these means): privatising itself (Prof. Laurence Brockliss, fellow of Magd and author of the latest official history of the university, did suggest this recently); merging the college endowments; soliciting money from alumni more aggressively; run more for-profit master's or certificate programmes; promise free passes to children of big donors; adopt a US-style fee regime whereby fees are ludicrously high but need only be paid in full by the rich with others being offered financial aid based on their needs; open for-profit campuses in, say, Bahrain or Beijing; sell some old, pretty, expensive buildings and move to new, ugly, cheap ones.

    Too tired to talk about the other points. But do have to correct you on a point of history (and note that you persist in completely misunderstanding what I mean in (5) – I'm not concerned about whether Oxford helped their political success).

    Wilson did not come from a political family. Almost all of Wilson's connections that contributed to his election to the Commons and to the Labour leadership came from his time at Oxford (Jesus, New, Univ, at the last of which he worked for Beveridge) and the Ministry for Labour (where he was an economist, thanks to his first in PPE). In this respect he was like many of his colleagues (e.g. Healey, Stewart, Shore, Castle).

    And the grocer's daughter from Kesteven was Thatcher, not May.
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    (Original post by Ellie419)
    It isn't subsidised for British students, otherwise it would be free. There is the government run student loans company, which you get two loans from, one for the uni fees which is now about £9250 per year for British students, and then a maintenance loan for accomodation which is based off your parents income and personal circumstances. University fees are subsidised for Scottish students though.
    Considering I'm now 27k in debt for my fees alone, I know that English students have to pay for uni.
    Subsidised means that we pay partially, and the government pays partially.
    It's means that our fee is reduced, not covered.
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    (Original post by Moura)
    Considering I'm now 27k in debt for my fees alone, I know that English students have to pay for uni.
    Subsidised means that we pay partially, and the government pays partially.
    It's means that our fee is reduced, not covered.
    Indeed, and the International fees are a better indication of the true cost (or market value...) of that university's courses excluding subsidies etc.

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    (Original post by Moura)
    Considering I'm now 27k in debt for my fees alone, I know that English students have to pay for uni.
    Subsidised means that we pay partially, and the government pays partially.
    It's means that our fee is reduced, not covered.
    All home students are subsidized to the extent and in the sense that the government fronts up the money and says you can pay it back when you can afford to.

    Beyond this only STEM students receive a subsidy, and actually only some of them*. I can still do a one year (that is 12 month) taught Masters degree in the Arts or Social Sciences for £6000, receiving as much teaching time as the undergrads in the same department, and this often in small groups and never in huge lectures, and having supervision and marking for a longish dissertation on top of that. On an undergraduate Arts or Social Sciences course having a big intake the per head costs, and certainly in the first year, might be as low as £3000.

    This is little understood by the STEM snobs on here. That the Arts and Social Sciences students are subsidizing them and not the other way about.


    *Not maths and stats and possibly not computer science or architecture. You really need labs to drive provision costs to £9000 per head even on a big intake.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    OKay, you obviously don't get it

    she's black...
    You can still be Racist...even if you're married to someone of a different race.
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    (Original post by Dann.It)
    You can still be Racist...even if you're married to someone of a different race.
    yes. You only really need to dislike one race to qualify as a racist. Some of the most enjoyably unabashed racists I know are East Asian women dating or actually married to white British men and forever embarrassing those partners by the expressing of attitudes toward brown and particularly black people that perhaps can still be voiced in Japan, China or Korea but probably shouldn't be here.
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    Yes, practically every graduate is in debt, it's a pretty common scenario for most. All that is guaranteed, is that you won't have to worry about it in 40 years (when loans expire). You will regret rejecting Oxford dearly, in my opinion, if you don't.

    Get the MBiochem, move to the U.S and do a fully funded PhD (grades obviously have to be good at uni, but that's another matter). I don't think the U.K have access to American/foreign bank accounts, that's why grads leave the U.K and take their money with them so they don't have to pay back. It's stingy, but practical.
    I am sure this has just changed.. for that reason. I think they can pursue the debt if you are abroad and it is based on your income in the country you live in. If you don't communicate with them, they can insist a repayment of the full loan outright. I was looking into it as i was considering leaving UK at some point.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    All home students are subsidized to the extent and in the sense that the government fronts up the money and says you can pay it back when you can afford to.

    Beyond this only STEM students receive a subsidy, and actually only some of them*. I can still do a one year (that is 12 month) taught Masters degree in the Arts or Social Sciences for £6000, receiving as much teaching time as the undergrads in the same department, and this often in small groups and never in huge lectures, and having supervision and marking for a longish dissertation on top of that. On an undergraduate Arts or Social Sciences course having a big intake the per head costs, and certainly in the first year, might be as low as £3000.

    This is little understood by the STEM snobs on here. That the Arts and Social Sciences students are subsidizing them and not the other way about.


    *Not maths and stats and possibly not computer science or architecture. You really need labs to drive provision costs to £9000 per head even on a big intake.
    Yeah I definitely got more for my money... my friends who did humanities literally got nothing, not even essential reading books, and we got labs each week and subsidised/free field trips. We always joked that they were paying for our degree lol
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    (Original post by CurryHead)
    I'm an International student from India, and I've been offered admission to a 4 year course in Biochemistry at University College, Oxford. Now I really really want to go, because my country has very limited opportunities for research, but my full four year fees comes up to about 170000 GBP (everything included), which is WAY more than I can possibly afford. Is there any sort of financial assistance available to me? I know there are the Reach and Simon and June Li scholarships, but those are very limited in number. Can anyone help me?
    If you can't afford it why on earth would you bother applying?

    I would scrap the Oxford offer as there doesn't seem to be much financial assistance or any option for you, take a gap year and apply to Harvard/ Yale/ Princeton as they are similar standard and provide financial aid to internationals and are need blind. I think they also pay for planes to and from the universities.

    Also look at if your government funds study. I know that Singapore will pay for people to study overseas in exchange for them working in the civil service afterwards.

    Good luck!
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    The harm is that someone else will get rejected because a place has been reserved for you which you cannot afford.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    All home students are subsidized to the extent and in the sense that the government fronts up the money and says you can pay it back when you can afford to.

    Beyond this only STEM students receive a subsidy, and actually only some of them*. I can still do a one year (that is 12 month) taught Masters degree in the Arts or Social Sciences for £6000, receiving as much teaching time as the undergrads in the same department, and this often in small groups and never in huge lectures, and having supervision and marking for a longish dissertation on top of that. On an undergraduate Arts or Social Sciences course having a big intake the per head costs, and certainly in the first year, might be as low as £3000.

    This is little understood by the STEM snobs on here. That the Arts and Social Sciences students are subsidizing them and not the other way about.


    *Not maths and stats and possibly not computer science or architecture. You really need labs to drive provision costs to £9000 per head even on a big intake.
    Disclaimer: I did a social science so I am not a STEM student trying to wind you up, but in the long run don't STEM students end up subsidising social science/ arts students far more because they tend to get much better paid jobs and pay far more in taxes? No idea if this is true, but just wondered. Also in my experience STEM students work far harder and have far more hours than arts/ social science students, possibly with the exception of people studying economics. I don't just mean far more hours of lecture time, but they seem to have lectures, seminars, labs and far more homework and exams than arts/ social science students do, so although they receive more lessons and teaching they also receive far more homework. I'm not saying it's right that STEM subjects are subsidised by arts/ social science students but just curious about your responses. I personally don't think anyone should subsidise anyone else and that you should just pay the cost of your degree and have a loan to cover it if you need it and then have to start paying it back as soon as you graduate, but that universities future income stream should depend on the loan repayments of its former students.
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    (Original post by oiseaux_tropic)
    ...don't STEM students end up subsidising social science/ arts students far more because they tend to get much better paid jobs and pay far more in taxes?
    no portion of those taxes is ring fenced for specifically university fees, though.

    Imagine that Alice and Bob go to Nonsuch Redbrick to study Materials Science and Sociology respectively.

    As you anticipate, Alice gets a better paid job and she pays off the full £27000 liability in fairly short order. Bob never earns ever so very much and has paid back £13000 when the debt is written off as he turns 51. Still the likelihood is that Bob has (more than) paid the provision costs of his degree, such that no-one else need make up the difference through higher tax contributions, because there is no difference to make up. By contrast Alice never quite paid the costs of providing her BSc, and as well enjoyed higher earnings in consequence of her getting it.
 
 
 
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