Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Back on the original topic (my parents are scientists, I have an offer for History so I claim neutrality on STEM/Humanities) the truth is education is expensive for domestic students and even more so for international students and only going to get more so with BREXIT, austerity and "market forces".

    We all had to think hard about our finances before applying in the current environment. If I did not have parents who can and will help limit that burden I'm not sure I would sign up to circa £60k debt (3 years fees & living costs as a domestic student) let alone the scale of costs faced by the OP.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ellie419)
    There is a really useful website called The Scholarship Hub, they have all sorts of scholarships including international ones.

    You could also look into getting a sponsorship, large companies may fund your degree if you agree to work for them afterwards. (I have a relative who did this and has been funded from the start of their bachelor's degree all the way through to their doctorate.)

    I'm not really sure what else there is out there that hasn't already been suggested but good luck.
    Thank you!!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    As far as I can tell, your only option if you are indeed desperate to study there for undergraduate is to simply get your foot in the door. That is, rather than tackling the impossible cost of four years, focus on one year. Can your family loan the first year's fees in instalments? Could you defer your offer and save up the fees yourself during a gap year? If so, you could then get a part-time job in Oxford (as well as apply for hardship funds from your college) and attempt to scrape through the first year. Who knows, if you do well perhaps Oxford will pull some strings. If not (and more realistically) you have still benefited from a year at Oxford (which can be listed on your CV) before finishing up in India, and returning to do your MSc/PhD at Oxford on an international studentship.

    As I said, that's if you're determined to study there. Oxford is, I think, worth extreme measures if research is your chosen career, despite its being fashionable on here as of late to relegate its superiority.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    **** it - just go. It's paid back in instalments, and will get written off after a certain time period. Plus, if you're in a foreign country, it's difficult to for them to make you pay it back.
    I think that is a pretty dodgy resolution to the OPs situation. You will have to pay the fees upfront every year in order to re register. I know because I am doing a post grad course and have to pay my fees annually before reclaiming them from the organisation that is funding me (which would not be available to the OP sadly).

    Universities don't even let you graduate if you have outstanding library fines.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Hey you must be pretty rich in India to consider studying abroad?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by macromicro)
    As far as I can tell, your only option if you are indeed desperate to study there for undergraduate is to simply get your foot in the door. That is, rather than tackling the impossible cost of four years, focus on one year. Can your family loan the first year's fees in instalments? Could you defer your offer and save up the fees yourself during a gap year? If so, you could then get a part-time job in Oxford (as well as apply for hardship funds from your college) and attempt to scrape through the first year. Who knows, if you do well perhaps Oxford will pull some strings. If not (and more realistically) you have still benefited from a year at Oxford (which can be listed on your CV) before finishing up in India, and returning to do your MSc/PhD at Oxford on an international studentship.

    As I said, that's if you're determined to study there. Oxford is, I think, worth extreme measures if research is your chosen career, despite its being fashionable on here as of late to relegate its superiority.
    You sir deserve a medal. You're fundamentally an optimist. kudos!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dann.It)
    You can still be Racist...even if you're married to someone of a different race.
    To be honest, getting married, and staying married for nine years, looking after a child of the other woman, and also bringing them over from Africa, speaks volumes. And it speaks volumes more than some pithy labels that 'anonymous' users, can throw out on the internet/tsr, i'm afraid!

    J
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by passé-présent)
    I mention no particular ways for Oxford to enrich itself because that was not essentially relevant to my argument. But others might suggest (though I do not endorse all of these means): privatising itself (Prof. Laurence Brockliss, fellow of Magd and author of the latest official history of the university, did suggest this recently); merging the college endowments; soliciting money from alumni more aggressively; run more for-profit master's or certificate programmes; promise free passes to children of big donors; adopt a US-style fee regime whereby fees are ludicrously high but need only be paid in full by the rich with others being offered financial aid based on their needs; open for-profit campuses in, say, Bahrain or Beijing; sell some old, pretty, expensive buildings and move to new, ugly, cheap ones.
    So you DO think Oxford should let the rich buy its way in, even officially. Most of what you're proposing are counterproductive to what you supposedly hope to seeing. If Oxford officially adopts the policy to let the rich buy their way in, only very few poorer ones could get in. Note also for home students, Oxford already is the most generous in terms of financial aid.

    Having more for-profit courses or in general accept more students isn't going to help the academic standards of its students so once again counterproductive. Note also Oxford already has the UK's third-largest Continuing Education department behind only OU and Birkback.

    I'll also have you know that for all your talks of learning from US top universities, there isn't better access over there. It has been estimated, based on the numbers for financial assistance, that 45.6% of all Harvard students have a family income in the top 3.8% of all Americans. Only 4% comes from the bottom quartile of the population, and 17.8% from the bottom three quartiles.

    Oxford has the highest portion of privately-educated students (they are 7% of the country) at around 45% in the UK. This means your logic "to let the poor study at Oxford, we should make it even more difficult for them to get in first".
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I don't want to be all doom and gloom but ultimately this is a *****er and you are just going to have to accept you can't afford it and go to another university. I'm not disputing you'd be an excellent student for Oxford but when all said and done I'd make an exceptional job of living in a £5 million mansion but I'm not going to put an offer in for one that's for sale and then just depress myself because I can't raise the funds to complete the purchase.
    Whatever Oxfords criteria are, be it fair, unfair, in favour of the upper classes etc. Their criteria isn't going to change any time soon and neither are the funding structures.

    As Brian Potter said, 'I wanna moonwalk, son. But life's a shithouse!'


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fandom-queen)
    God, keep the kohinoor DAMMIT, but at least subsidise education for us indians as a past commonwealth country. We just want to learn our subject............

    Spoiler:
    Show






    We don't need all the reparations Tharoor asked for. We just need lower fees.





    India spends billions on nuclear weapons, military infrastructure, space programmes. It also has institutionalised and rampant corruption where virtually no-one pays tax. The UK tax payers even hand out hundreds of millions to relieve poverty in India. W.T.F?

    The problem is you guy's fleeing the issues instead of dedicating your lives to solving them in your own country. It takes courage, guts, tenacity, blood, sweat and toil to do that.

    But all I see is everyone wanting to take the easy way out and cheating to get it handed to them on a plate.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Oxford has the highest portion of privately-educated students (they are 7% of the country)
    this isn't right and is a red-herring statistic often bandied about. 7% of school children in the UK are being privately educated. But Oxford, like any other university, doesn't recruit from the pool that is schoolchildren in the UK but rather recruits 17-18 year olds in education in the UK, and just over 20% of these are in the independent sector.

    That difference in figures exists because (i) working class kids are much more likely to drop out of education at 16 than are kids being privately educated, such that the relative percentage would rise even if there were no other change, and (ii) for the aspirant lower middle class, 2 years of private 6th form might be the whole of the push that the family budget can run to, "now's the time to make sacrifices for Tim's future", so the transitioning works in that direction and at that stage.

    Something else that's true, and bears on this discussion, is that GCSEs allow for sorting and scholarships. You'll see on TSR a lot of "chance me for Westminster VIth form" threads, where students anticipating 10 A*s or something similarly preposterous are wanting to switch into the independent sector at that stage. This is important because students with 10 A*s are are as well the ones most likely to later interest Oxford.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    this isn't right and is a red-herring statistic often bandied about. 7% of school children in the UK are being privately educated. But Oxford, like any other university, doesn't recruit from the pool that is schoolchildren in the UK but rather recruits 17-18 year olds in education in the UK, and just over 20% of these are in the independent sector.

    That difference in figures exists because (i) working class kids are much more likely to drop out of education at 16 than are kids being privately educated, such that the relative percentage would rise even if there were no other change, and (ii) for the aspirant lower middle class, 2 years of private 6th form might be the whole of the push that the family budget can run to, "now's the time to make sacrifices for Tim's future", so the transitioning works in that direction and at that stage.

    Something else that's true, and bears on this discussion, is that GCSEs allow for sorting and scholarships. You'll see on TSR a lot of "chance me for Westminster VIth form" threads, where students anticipating 10 A*s or something similarly preposterous are wanting to switch into the independent sector at that stage. This is important because students with 10 A*s are are as well the ones most likely to later interest Oxford.
    I compared only comparable numbers. I can't use an American overall % with a British % that's only about eligible candidates.

    Context is important.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Oxbridge has made big strides over the last 20 years to become more egalitarian. Inevitably entry is still somewhat skewed with wealthier/Independent School pupils having an inherent advantage as they are likely to getter better support to prepare for exams, admissions tests and interviews but even here there is massive disparity between the level of support at an average independent school vs. the uber wealthy top public schools. Many independent schools are often no better funded, staffed or equipped than good grammar and academy schools and many/most are not aggressively selective on academic grounds.

    Some famous public schools have long-established multi-generation connections at senior levels with Oxbridge that should not matter but possibly still do, even if it is only unconscious bias for some tutors to expect that someone from a certain school is more likely to have 'the right stuff' to thrive in a tutor-centric system. That is an area where there is still scope to improve and programmes like the schools partnerships & UNIQ help balance this out as does the means-tested bursary scheme.

    International students represent both an opportunity to open the door wider and improve diversity but also a risk, particularly in austerity times, as they often pay greater fees and are commercially attractive to the top universities in both the short and long-term (developing global alumni networks to support donations etc.).

    It is easy to beat up elite universities for their failings but we need to acknowledge the improvements being made towards levelling the playing field. Ultimately they have to continue to be demanding if they are to continue to be elite. There is only so much any university can do to redress/address the inconsistencies in our school system and the uneven distribution of wealth in society. Overall the data suggests Oxbridge is improving access and balancing all the competing forces fairly well but can still do more. They are not the bastions of privilege of history/mythology.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.