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Applying for a general PhD vs applying for one with a given title Watch

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    Hello,

    I am looking and have been applying to various further study options, including PhD's. most of these have been general PhD's (applied to a certain school but without applying to a particular PhD opening or position) however I have found a PhD title I like the look of, and I am considering applying there. However, I do not know how applying to a PhD with a given title will influence my time doing that PhD - will I still be able to do lab rotations? Am I right in assuming I will have a lot less leeway to pursue tangents to that main research if they interest me? If I find that it is not the course for me, will I have fewer options of altering the PhD, aside from just quitting?
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    A PhD with a fixed title is just that. You won't do lab rotations and depending on the supervisor may not have time to go off and do other things. That's why it's so important to know what your supervisor is like and to get on with them. Starting on a PhD that you're not sure about is not a good idea for a number of reasons and will come across in your application and at interview so please choose very carefully and make sure you find out everything you need to know before you commit,
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    A PhD with a fixed title is just that. You won't do lab rotations and depending on the supervisor may not have time to go off and do other things. That's why it's so important to know what your supervisor is like and to get on with them. Starting on a PhD that you're not sure about is not a good idea for a number of reasons and will come across in your application and at interview so please choose very carefully and make sure you find out everything you need to know before you commit,
    I realise that it is not a good idea to apply for one I am unsure about - However I have seen this PhD project offered before and wanted to apply then, but by that point, it was too late for that year. I, unfortunately, missed it this year due to it being listed on a different group page to where I saw it last year, despite having looked for it.

    I am concerned about the lack of rotation and lack of freedom - I was hoping to get some practical experience through the PhD, however the project itself is data analysis - and while the subject of the data analysis is something I am very interested in, I am worried that such a PhD will set me up a lot more for analysing data as opposed to physically gathering and analysing data. While the PhD in question does offer training, there is a far cry from having been trained in a technique and having used it many times throughout a PhD.

    Thank you very much for your information though, it is most useful.
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    (Original post by Crimmy)
    Hello,

    I am looking and have been applying to various further study options, including PhD's. most of these have been general PhD's (applied to a certain school but without applying to a particular PhD opening or position) however I have found a PhD title I like the look of, and I am considering applying there. However, I do not know how applying to a PhD with a given title will influence my time doing that PhD - will I still be able to do lab rotations? Am I right in assuming I will have a lot less leeway to pursue tangents to that main research if they interest me? If I find that it is not the course for me, will I have fewer options of altering the PhD, aside from just quitting?
    Hello,

    The best way to get a more specific answer to your question is to contact the supervisor directly, as a supervisor's name would normally be attached to a research title which is advertised. The flexibility of a research varies from supervisor to supervisor, from University to University. However, do not expect the PhD to allow for too much flexibility otherwise it becomes antithetical to what a PhD is. (The tangent you asked about).

    I had similar questions while attempting to start my own PhD, which was answered by the supervisors I met. A lot of questions.

    It's important you make a choice based on your motivations and what you feel will bring you the most fulfilment as a PhD could be interesting and, some times, arduous and lonely. It's that motivation that keeps you going and not quitting.

    All the best!
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    (Original post by Cranfield University)
    Hello,

    The best way to get a more specific answer to your question is to contact the supervisor directly, as a supervisor's name would normally be attached to a research title which is advertised. The flexibility of a research varies from supervisor to supervisor, from University to University. However, do not expect the PhD to allow for too much flexibility otherwise it becomes antithetical to what a PhD is. (The tangent you asked about).

    I had similar questions while attempting to start my own PhD, which was answered by the supervisors I met. A lot of questions.

    It's important you make a choice based on your motivations and what you feel will bring you the most fulfilment as a PhD could be interesting and, some times, arduous and lonely. It's that motivation that keeps you going and not quitting.

    All the best!
    Hello,

    thank you for this information, it is very useful. As I have left the deadline rather late to ask before applying, I think I will apply and ask the questions as soon as I have a good opportunity to, if I get to the interview stage. Then I will be able to properly formulate those questions and I will have a better idea of the sort of answers I am hoping for. Is this strategy rather rude?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Crimmy)
    Hello,

    thank you for this information, it is very useful. As I have left the deadline rather late to ask before applying, I think I will apply and ask the questions as soon as I have a good opportunity to, if I get to the interview stage. Then I will be able to properly formulate those questions and I will have a better idea of the sort of answers I am hoping for. Is this strategy rather rude?

    Thanks!

    This should be fine, however, I am not sure it is inappropriate to raise those questions now. Supervisors are usually impressed when potential students show interest in the area of research. You show interest by asking relevant questions.
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    (Original post by Cranfield University)
    This should be fine, however, I am not sure it is inappropriate to raise those questions now. Supervisors are usually impressed when potential students show interest in the area of research. You show interest by asking relevant questions.
    Ah, ok - I will apply and email them also, instead of waiting for the interview.
    Thanks!
 
 
 
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