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    So it's forecast to start snowing in the next couple of hours and I was just wondering...in the event that it does snow what are you meant to do?
    I presume drive slower and take more care but is there any specific rules or anything for driving in the snow?

    I've got a mini but I assume any general rules or guidelines will be across the board not car specific?
    Thanks!
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    Try and take the flattest route possible - and only drive if you have to, if there's lots of snow settled on the ground!
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    If it's thick - has actually settled on the ground - then accelerate and decelerate slowly. Use engine braking rather than wheel brakes where possible. Keep in low gear.

    If it's not, then just drive normally, tbh. It's just cold rain.
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    I go into a little bit of detail; depending on how interested you are, this may or may not be of much use to you. Nonetheless, I'm quite passionate so here we go!

    Think of the physics:

    Traction (i.e. grip of tyres, so essentially the power that wheels can deliver to the ground) is reduced. So accelerating (+/-) quickly can break the friction forces, causing your wheels to spin (google 'car/bike burnout' for a similar effect).

    This applies not just to forces applied forwards and backwards, but also sideways. Turn your wheels too quickly, and the wheels will no longer push in the direction you want them too, but will actually be facing sideways, approaching tarmac in a straight line (google 'understeer').
    Fixing this involves pointing your wheels back to where you are actually heading, and reapplying your steer more smoothly.

    This all applies to each wheel individually, so you are able to lose traction in the front or back individually. This can lead to either understeer or oversteer. Understeer means you'll hit the wall with the front of the car, because the car isn't turning sideways fast enough. Oversteer is when you get the back end out, and hit the wall with the rear of the car.

    Knowing what drivetrain your car is can help know how to fix it (RWD, FWD, AWD etc). Mini, I'm assuming FWD.

    If your vehicle lacks ABS (unlikely), lack of traction can affect braking too. Brake too hard, the wheels will clamp to the brakes, and stop turning. The tyres then slide along the ground, and can't turn, can't roll, you slide into whatever. To fix it, ease off the brakes, and throttle into the turn.

    HOWEVER:
    Most of this, you'll never need to apply on British roads: they're gritted, they're plowed through by heavy trucks and nice guys with big Range Rovers, and we don't see thick snow, as Drewski mentions, it's just like cold rain.


    Take-home message: Apply all controls smoothly, if in doubt, release everything and reapply more smoothly. Any harsh movements are unlikely to fix anything.

    And let the engine warm up first please? And de-ice ALL your goddamn windows, and your mirrors. Don't be that guy.
    Safe driving!:snowman:
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    When sliding down a hill, don't brake, use engine braking.
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    Go gently with no sudden movements. Consider pulling away in second gear to reduce wheel spin. Don't park on a hill. Chuck an extra coat and boots in the back seat. Take a charged mobile and water and snacks, even for short journeys.
    Do your best not to stop when going uphill, so keep your distance. De-ice the windows before you leave.
    Understand that everyone else is an idiot.
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    (Original post by InV15iblefrog)
    If your vehicle lacks ABS (unlikely), lack of traction can affect braking too. Brake too hard, the wheels will clamp to the brakes, and stop turning. The tyres then slide along the ground, and can't turn, can't roll, you slide into whatever. To fix it, ease off the brakes, and throttle into the turn.
    Be careful with this. ABS doesn't make you invincible. ABS works by noticing if a wheel has locked up under braking when the other three are still turning, and then modulating the brakes to that one wheel to keep it turning. If you hit the brakes hard enough to lock all four wheels then the ABS system has no reference to act upon and assumes that the car is stopped and won't modulate the braking, leaving you to slide in exactly the same way as if you had no ABS at all.

    IMO all drivers should be taught at least basic cadence braking techniques as a learner driver.

    If you should get into trouble when it's snowy or icy it's best to keep off the brakes if you can and simply steer for the best outcome. If you lock the brakes then you lose all steering, but staying off them will give you at least some semblance of control and might make the difference between bouncing off the hedge/kerb, and hitting the car you're trying to avoid.

    It's a good idea to test how much traction you have just after you set off by doing a quick "emergency stop" on a quiet road to see just how much traction you have. Touching the brakes and having the car slide rather than stop is an excellent way of driving home how little traction you have and helps you drive more safely by leaving more stopping distance and driving more slowly.
 
 
 
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