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    Hi,

    So I graduated in July 2016 with a First Class Honours degree in Computing. I decided to go on a holiday abroad for a month or so after my graduation ceremony - and I absolutely enjoyed it!

    Come September 2016, I was slowly settling back to reality and looking for graduate jobs within the Computing sector. There were quite a few, however they did not appeal to me due to their lack of salary or general satisfaction. October quickly came round the corner and I was literally looking for suitable graduate jobs everyday. Signed up to a few agencies, went on LinkedIn and heavily invested in my LinkedIn profile. After October/mid November an agency contacted me with regards to a job at a leading bank for a 8 month contract. I have always been skeptical about job agencies, but with my frustration in my job search I willingly applied for the job. Getting the job wasn't easy either. Had to do a phone interview, video interview. a face to face interview with the bank and an assessment to top it all off! They offered me the job in the end - but the one thing that has been putting me off is that it isn't really related to Computing. There is no real technicality or programming involved. It is heavily business orientated - my only worry is that I am wasting my time. I am taking the job regardless, but like should I apply to graduate schemes for Computing?
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    Anyone?
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    The graduate market is highly competitive. There are a lot of excellent students, with strong degrees, internship experience and lots of other strong points to their application competing for jobs. Regardless of what scheme it is, youre likely to be up against strong competition.

    You sound like you've been quite selective during this cycle. I suppose thats not necessarily a bad thing if you really want to make sure you get a job you feel well suited to and interests you. However, for most people there comes a time when being selective isn't particularly an option, and securing a job becomes the main priority.

    I have some experience with programming, but not enough to fully understand what grad jobs are directly advertised to a computer science graduate. But I would make two points. Firstly, a lot of jobs that may not stand out as a programming role or be advertised as such may actually contain a lot of programming. For example, I interned in risk for Nomura, and essentially spent every day programming. The job role doesnt necessarily sound like it would be programming every day, but thats what it was. Secondly, once you have a foot in the door, the company will want to place you where youre best suited. If you show passion and drive, and you put yourself out there to get involved with projects that do involve programming, its possible to move within a company.

    My grad scheme isn't necessarily in the industry or role I initially expected to be going in to. I was hoping to go in to banking or accounting and work in risk management. I currently have an offer from an energy firm for a finance grad scheme and studying CIMA qualification. Not where I initially thought id be, but from a bit of LinkedIn snooping I see they have people working in market risk so my plan is to try and get that on one of my rotations, show my passion and ability and take it from there. Time is slightly more pressing for me because of my age but I would prefer to do that than reject the offer on the hope of getting something next year.

    Personally I would say to identify the industry you would like to be in and apply for the grad schemes within that industry. If a company doesnt have a scheme that looks directly relatable to what you want, choose the next best thing they have. If you get an offer, then thats great, and if you then find something more relevant you can reject it. But at least you have a way in.
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    (Original post by josh_v)
    The graduate market is highly competitive. There are a lot of excellent students, with strong degrees, internship experience and lots of other strong points to their application competing for jobs. Regardless of what scheme it is, youre likely to be up against strong competition.

    You sound like you've been quite selective during this cycle. I suppose thats not necessarily a bad thing if you really want to make sure you get a job you feel well suited to and interests you. However, for most people there comes a time when being selective isn't particularly an option, and securing a job becomes the main priority.

    I have some experience with programming, but not enough to fully understand what grad jobs are directly advertised to a computer science graduate. But I would make two points. Firstly, a lot of jobs that may not stand out as a programming role or be advertised as such may actually contain a lot of programming. For example, I interned in risk for Nomura, and essentially spent every day programming. The job role doesnt necessarily sound like it would be programming every day, but thats what it was. Secondly, once you have a foot in the door, the company will want to place you where youre best suited. If you show passion and drive, and you put yourself out there to get involved with projects that do involve programming, its possible to move within a company.

    My grad scheme isn't necessarily in the industry or role I initially expected to be going in to. I was hoping to go in to banking or accounting and work in risk management. I currently have an offer from an energy firm for a finance grad scheme and studying CIMA qualification. Not where I initially thought id be, but from a bit of LinkedIn snooping I see they have people working in market risk so my plan is to try and get that on one of my rotations, show my passion and ability and take it from there. Time is slightly more pressing for me because of my age but I would prefer to do that than reject the offer on the hope of getting something next year.

    Personally I would say to identify the industry you would like to be in and apply for the grad schemes within that industry. If a company doesnt have a scheme that looks directly relatable to what you want, choose the next best thing they have. If you get an offer, then thats great, and if you then find something more relevant you can reject it. But at least you have a way in.
    Thank you for taking the time to answer to my thread.

    Yeah, I was initially after something more technical as I am more of a "hands-on" person. The mistake I made was not to apply for graduate schemes whilst in my final year at university - and also going on holiday abroad. However, I enjoyed my life to the max and met my goals by sacrificing my prospective job careers. From September, it was a bit of a struggle to find very good technical roles - but I was contacted via a prominent and reputable UK job agency who at the time had a few roles within a leading UK bank. It was a business analyst role for an I.T project for a fixed term - and I applied to just pass the remaining time and importantly meet some contacts and really invest on myself and my C.V. I got that job after going through a tough recruitment process and although ironically I have always been against banks - I have finally ended up working for one!

    My only concern was what to do in the meantime - because this job I have is only until the end of August or so. I was thinking of heading back to university but now I want to get a graduate development or technical job
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    Id say you would be in a good position to apply for either graduate schemes or experienced hire after an 8 month project (although I'm not sure if 8 months experience is enough for employers). If your current position takes you up until August, if they decide not to keep you on, then thats an ideal time to throw yourself in to grad applications. Most of them open up around that time. Granted you wouldn't start until September 2018 for most of them. But that would give you a year to travel/do a masters/do whatever you like. On the other hand, you could apply for experience hire positions to begin as soon as you finished your current placement.

    Personally I would go for a graduate scheme. I think the opportunity to move within a firm would be better, you'd be likely to get more training, probably gives you a better foundation to then go on to apply for experienced hire.

    I did around 40 applications. Jobs which I was hugely over-qualified for (in my opinion) were rejecting me instantly. Im now down to one offer and a phone interview with one more company which I would probably prefer to what I already have. As I said, choose the industry, do as many applications as possible, then choose the next industry and repeat. Getting through to assessment centres where you can actually talk to people in the division about what you will be doing on a daily basis can be quite eye opening.
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    You can be anything you want to be nowadays. Boys can even grow up to be women.
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    (Original post by josh_v)
    Id say you would be in a good position to apply for either graduate schemes or experienced hire after an 8 month project (although I'm not sure if 8 months experience is enough for employers). If your current position takes you up until August, if they decide not to keep you on, then thats an ideal time to throw yourself in to grad applications. Most of them open up around that time. Granted you wouldn't start until September 2018 for most of them. But that would give you a year to travel/do a masters/do whatever you like. On the other hand, you could apply for experience hire positions to begin as soon as you finished your current placement.

    Personally I would go for a graduate scheme. I think the opportunity to move within a firm would be better, you'd be likely to get more training, probably gives you a better foundation to then go on to apply for experienced hire.

    I did around 40 applications. Jobs which I was hugely over-qualified for (in my opinion) were rejecting me instantly. Im now down to one offer and a phone interview with one more company which I would probably prefer to what I already have. As I said, choose the industry, do as many applications as possible, then choose the next industry and repeat. Getting through to assessment centres where you can actually talk to people in the division about what you will be doing on a daily basis can be quite eye opening.
    Yeah the thing is I already graduated in July 2016 and well this job that I am taking up now is with an agency - so technically the agency has employed me but I work for the bank. I took it up as it was with a really prevalent and reputable bank and it would definitely make my C.V. stand out.

    I know with graduate schemes you have to start applying early so I might start applying for the more technical jobs WHILST working for the bank - so in case there are any hiccups or things don't go to plan then I can think of alternatives.

    Whilst, the role is more business-y I have a feeling that it will go well and hopefully I can meet some good contacts and add them on LinkedIn.

    I was going to ask, is it wise to make friends at work?
 
 
 
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