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should a parent support a young child's wish to be a different gender? Watch

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    (Original post by Hassan2578)
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    Yes, but they should only go as far as letting the child choose a different name, how they dress and how they want their hair styled. Nothing invasive.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yes, but they should only go as far as letting the child choose a different name, how they dress and how they want their hair styled. Nothing invasive.
    interesting you say this.. shouldn't we all be content with the body we are born in?
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    (Original post by Hassan2578)
    interesting you say this.. shouldn't we all be content with the body we are born in?
    Yes and whilst I strongly do believe that, I wouldn't want my child to be unhappy and I certainly wouldn't want them suffering in silence
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yes and whilst I strongly do believe that, I wouldn't want my child to be unhappy and I certainly wouldn't want them suffering in silence
    it could just be a phase
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    (Original post by Hassan2578)
    it could just be a phase
    Yeah exactly, which is why I said nothing invasive
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    There was a documentary about this on BBC 1 tonight , did u watch it ?
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    In my opinion, no. They are just going through a phase where they are merely inquisitive as to what life as the opposite gender is like. Just because a young boy wishes play with dolls does not mean he wants to be a girl.
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    It depends on whether it is just a phase or whether that person actually has gender dysphoria. But at the end of the day,the ending is going to be the same whatever we do.People should just do whatever makes them happy and the world would be a better place if there were less haters.
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    I don't see why not - obviously no surgery or anything until the child is old enough to make an informed choice but there's no harm in allowing a child to wear different clothes/go by a different name/play with different toys
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    i did indeed
    (Original post by Supernova91)
    There was a documentary about this on BBC 1 tonight , did u watch it ?
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    No because children don't understand what changing gender means. When they become an adult who fully understands the process and how it will change their life and they still want to change gender then they can be supported by family.


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    Ive always wsnted to be male, my ex bf said i wasnt feminine at all despite being a small build. From old photos all i wore when i was 16 was tracksuit/hoodies and trainers and i had a terrible wavy bobstyle as short as my ears lol. Basically I was trying to get as close to a lads haircut as possible, without it actually being a lads cut. All my role models were male. Ive always prided myself on physical strength and athletic ability compared to other girls (and guys!) it gook me a while to realise that many girls couldnt give 2 hoots as to how strong they were their attention was on attracting lads mine was on being strong/exercise. I was known as the tomboy of the estate. Girls these days dress very womanly at 16.
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    yes, but i wouldn't want my child getting hormone treatments (idk what they're called) or surgery at a young age, i think it would be best to wait until an age where they're certain they want a gender change
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    I think that would probably end up confusing the kid more. Young children don't really know what they want in the grand scheme of things and aren't mature enough to be relied upon when it comes to their identities. Kids just go through phases.

    If your five-year-old son suddenly decides he wants to be called Tina and wear girls' clothes, encouraging or facilitating him might just end up embarrassing him or even screwing up his childhood. Kids need structure, and letting them run wild and free with everything about themselves isn't good for them.

    Once kids start maturing and reaching adulthood, they are in a better position to make decisions about their lives and identities.
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    How young is young?
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I don't see why not - obviously no surgery or anything until the child is old enough to make an informed choice but there's no harm in allowing a child to wear different clothes/go by a different name/play with different toys
    I agree with this. Even if you don't agree with any other motivations for it, not supporting your child won't change their wishes, it will only make their life even more difficult with it.
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    (Original post by Hassan2578)
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    No.


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    Yes but I think wait until they're old enough to make such a huge decision to have the surgery and hormones.
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    No I think that they should wait until the child is 16, 18 would be better as its a big decision to make and the person making it needs to be fully informed and know that they are making a rational decision considering all of the information and facts before them. At 18 and below we think we know everything but there is a massive gap in maturity from 16-18
 
 
 
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