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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I know various people from minority ethnic backgrounds who were thrown out by their parents. You are right that it is certainly far less common though. There is a big difference between asking them to leave, and creating very reasonable conditions of residence that they can choose to opt out of.

    Asking for your child to make a contribution to their upkeep is entirely reasonable, even if you don't need the money. It teaches them something about responsibility. My child will be doing so as soon as they leave school. If I don't need the money, it will all go into an account they won't know about to be used as a mortgage deposit or whatever. The lesson is valuable.

    If you have the money, you should help your parents. I moved out at 16 and have routinely helped my mum out with considerable amounts of money. It seems ridiculous to me that an adult would expect to be in a position to help and not offer to. Let alone waiting to be asked. I agree with you that people mature throughout their 20s, but delaying your child's adulthood for no good reason does them no favours.

    I recognise that there are cultural differences, and respect a parents right to support their child for as long as they want. I also commend parents who don't want to let their progeny become overgrown toddlers.

    Do you not find this reasonable?
    I know my board won't be put into an account, though I'll be doing similar with my money anyway. I had to grow up pretty quick at one point but I wasn't trying to sound like I didn't want to pay it, I was just more curious to see how it compared to others.
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    Might be a bit steep. In the worse case scenario where They make showers modular which is what happened with me And They make everything have a price then it's greedy. I would say that there are cheaper places to live but If you're in full Time work then it's okay.
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    (Original post by Anfanny)
    Might be a bit steep. In the worse case scenario where They make showers modular which is what happened with me And They make everything have a price then it's greedy. I would say that there are cheaper places to live but If you're in full Time work then it's okay.
    Thanks for your view
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    I was in full-time education from 18-19 (took an extra year of Sixth Form due to some family issues) and I had to pay £20 board a week. At the time, I wasn't very happy but looking back now, it was more than reasonable. Hearing figures like £80p/w I can only pray for you... You said you're working full-time though? I'm guessing proportionally £80 isn't that much out your wages per week. Could always try negotiating the board figure. Maybe say you'll do X and Y to get a decrease of £10.
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    (Original post by CTLevers)
    I was in full-time education from 18-19 (took an extra year of Sixth Form due to some family issues) and I had to pay £20 board a week. At the time, I wasn't very happy but looking back now, it was more than reasonable. Hearing figures like £80p/w I can only pray for you... You said you're working full-time though? I'm guessing proportionally £80 isn't that much out your wages per week. Could always try negotiating the board figure. Maybe say you'll do X and Y to get a decrease of £10.
    Thanks for this. Yes i'm working full time but I get just below minimum wage. Might try negotiating but don't want to unsettle the atmosphere.
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    I think it's higher that what you'd charge most under 18's but it shouldn't be a problem. I personally wasn't paying any rent (or very small amounts, up to £100 a month) for 3 years before coming to uni, on the basis that the money I would have paid as rent went towards savings for uni.

    It's still far cheaper than moving out and if you are earning a decent amount of money then you're in a pretty good situation. I personally wouldn't charge my (theoretical) kids that much, especially not under 18. But that assumes they're still in education. I wouldn't charge normal rent amounts until they were in a full time job
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I think it's higher that what you'd charge most under 18's but it shouldn't be a problem. I personally wasn't paying any rent (or very small amounts, up to £100 a month) for 3 years before coming to uni, on the basis that the money I would have paid as rent went towards savings for uni.

    It's still far cheaper than moving out and if you are earning a decent amount of money then you're in a pretty good situation. I personally wouldn't charge my (theoretical) kids that much, especially not under 18. But that assumes they're still in education. I wouldn't charge normal rent amounts until they were in a full time job
    The idea you had for saving it was good. I don't necessarily have a gauge on what is a "decent" amount of money but considering what most have said on here, I think the board is reasonable.
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    (Original post by AnonyMeAMA)
    The idea you had for saving it was good. I don't necessarily have a gauge on what is a "decent" amount of money but considering what most have said on here, I think the board is reasonable.
    Well even minimum wage money would be good for an under 18. Considering most under 18's aren't working full time (or jobs at all) then anything over £400-500 would probably be considered decent. But it really depends. 10-20 hours per week seems to be average for someone still in education, which comes out to £300-600 per month on minimum wage. That said if you're under 18 and you minimum wage is actually £4 per hour then that;s much harder to achieve. It is of course totally up in the air.

    I personally wouldn't agree with charging £80 per week if my kid were only earning £400 or a month. I'd personally charge a percentage, so maybe say they pay 10% of what they earn. Charging so much for anyone who is still in education seems a little unfair and sends the wrong message. I don't think young people in education should have to also work and then have most of their wages taken away by rent. Telling them to work more suggests that work is more important than education.

    But this is totally all subjective and depends on personal morals and situations.
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    (Original post by AnonyMeAMA)
    Thanks for this. Yes i'm working full time but I get just below minimum wage. Might try negotiating but don't want to unsettle the atmosphere.
    Why are you getting paid under minimum wage? Is this an informal family "job" or is this an actual employer? If so, that's quite illegal. Use the lawsuit money to pay your board XD
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Well even minimum wage money would be good for an under 18. Considering most under 18's aren't working full time (or jobs at all) then anything over £400-500 would probably be considered decent. But it really depends. 10-20 hours per week seems to be average for someone still in education, which comes out to £300-600 per month on minimum wage. That said if you're under 18 and you minimum wage is actually £4 per hour then that;s much harder to achieve. It is of course totally up in the air.

    I personally wouldn't agree with charging £80 per week if my kid were only earning £400 or a month. I'd personally charge a percentage, so maybe say they pay 10% of what they earn. Charging so much for anyone who is still in education seems a little unfair and sends the wrong message. I don't think young people in education should have to also work and then have most of their wages taken away by rent. Telling them to work more suggests that work is more important than education.

    But this is totally all subjective and depends on personal morals and situations.
    I don't balance my work with education, just to clarify, and i'm going off adult minimum wage not the under 18/19 one. The percentage idea sounds good but I don't really have anything else I need to spend my wage on so I don't mind contributing.
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    (Original post by CTLevers)
    Why are you getting paid under minimum wage? Is this an informal family "job" or is this an actual employer? If so, that's quite illegal. Use the lawsuit money to pay your board XD
    Sorry I meant under minimum wage for adult earners not the one for under 18/19. It's an actual employer
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    I think if the child is over 18 and working, the parents should make them pay and put all the money the child gives them to a secret savings account and give it to them when they decide to move out! That's what I'll do with my children (if I ever have any)!
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    I am afraid you are under their roof so they can do that especially if you are working full time.
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    I do chores instead-I'd be doing them anyway.
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    I think if you're earning money and have a stable job then it's perfectly reasonable for parents to charge you rent, and £80 is less than you would pay elsewhere Otherwise you'd end up like my cousins, who are living at home (for free) into their late 20s/ 30s... Paying rent makes you appreciate what you earn more, become more responsible with your money, and give something back to the parents who have spent the last however many years paying for your food, board, education, holidays, toys, etc.

    For students in full-time education it would be different, charging rent would encourage you to do more part-time work and thus detract from your studies.
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    (Original post by elekro)
    I think if the child is over 18 and working, the parents should make them pay and put all the money the child gives them to a secret savings account and give it to them when they decide to move out! That's what I'll do with my children (if I ever have any)!
    What about if they're under 16 like in my case? I think the account is a good idea but I know my rent wouldn't go into one of those
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    (Original post by AnonyMeAMA)
    Sorry I meant under minimum wage for adult earners not the one for under 18/19. It's an actual employer

    £7.50 - 25+
    £7.05 - 21- 24
    £5.60 - 18-20
    £4.05 - Under 18
    £3.50 - Apprentice
    This is the minimum wage for 2017. So are you earning less than £5.60p/h?
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    I pay a grand total of £0
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    (Original post by Rock Fan)
    I am afraid you are under their roof so they can do that especially if you are working full time.
    Yeah I understand that, I was just curious to see what others thought and how it compared
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    What the **** is up white people taking rent from their own children :rofl:
 
 
 
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