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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And why isn't it the future of 15 year olds and 3 year olds.
    Yep and not only that but remain wouldn't have got over a million votes more from the 16/17 year olds more than leave and they would still have lost


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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And why isn't it the future of 15 year olds and 3 year olds.
    It is their future yes, but we must draw the line somewhere. 16 is not unreasonable as at that age you can bring another life into the world and make decisions that will ultimately change your life, but the one decision that will could potentially shape your life more than any other,you can't. How is that even remotely fair?
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    [QUOTE=nulli tertius;69594708]And why isn't it the future of 15 year olds and 3 year olds.[/ QUOTE]

    It's a good point but 16 year olds take GCSES which change their lives and so do some 17 year olds for alevels and BTEC. If we're old enough take exams for our future self we should be able to go vote to shape our future😊
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    (Original post by paul514)
    Yep and not only that but remain wouldn't have got over a million votes more from the 16/17 year olds more than leave and they would still have lost


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    82% of 16/17 year olds on the student room voted to remain in the EU.
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    (Original post by _aprildawn)
    It is their future yes, but we must draw the line somewhere. 16 is not unreasonable as at that age you can bring another life into the world and make decisions that will ultimately change your life, but the one decision that will could potentially shape your life more than any other,you can't. How is that even remotely fair?
    18 is not unreasonable either. It is the age of majority and when in 1970 the age of majority was reduced to 18, the voting age followed. The difference between the legal capacities of someone before and after their 18th birthday is greater than any other life boundary.

    Biologically 16 is not significant for being a parent and in modern society (I accept that it was different in past generations), it is a poor exemplar because virtually all 16 year old parents today are either accidental parents or are making poor life choices.
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    I would negotiate a way for us to trade with the EU with low tariffs and have control of our own borders. If Le Pen wins the French election and Angela Merkel continues to be a bit soft, we could probably negotiate a good deal.
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    [QUOTE=rforrosie;69595434]
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And why isn't it the future of 15 year olds and 3 year olds.[/ QUOTE]

    It's a good point but 16 year olds take GCSES which change their lives and so do some 17 year olds for alevels and BTEC. If we're old enough take exams for our future self we shoul d be able to go vote to shape our future😊
    Does that give 10 year olds the vote in Kent and Lincolnshire (11 plus areas)?
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    [QUOTE=nulli tertius;69595638]18 is not unreasonable either. It is the age of majority and when in 1970 the age of majority was reduced to 18, the voting age followed. The difference between the legal capacities of someone before and after their 18th birthday is greater than any other life boundary.

    Biologically 16 is not significant for being a parent and in modern society (I accept that it was different in past generations), it is a poor exemplar because virtually all 16 year old parents today are either accidental parents or are making poor life choices.[/QUOTED]

    how come Scottish 16/17 year olds can vote. Scotland must believe they are old enough so why can't we vote?
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Exit CAP
    Exit CFP
    Exit ECJ
    Exit ECHR

    Retain European Arrest Warrant
    Retain membership of science and education stuff
    Retain Free trade in goods and membership of single market for services (equivalence instead of ECJ)

    What i would offer for the above deal..

    Annual payment (so long as our net contribution is reduced we may as well bribe them)
    EU immigration quota excluding refugees (basically we agree that 200,000 EU immigrants will be given permanent residence each year)
    That is EEA/EFTA apart from the immigration.

    But net EU migration (not even permanent residence!) is under 200,000 and has not gone over that since 2004. It stands to reason it will continue to go down as eastern countries develop.

    So what's the problem? Keep free movement.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    18 is not unreasonable either. It is the age of majority and when in 1970 the age of majority was reduced to 18, the voting age followed. The difference between the legal capacities of someone before and after their 18th birthday is greater than any other life boundary.

    Biologically 16 is not significant for being a parent and in modern society (I accept that it was different in past generations), it is a poor exemplar because virtually all 16 year old parents today are either accidental parents or are making poor life choices.
    The legal capabilities may change largely at 18 but how can you say they don't change more at a younger age? At the age of 10 you become criminally reasonable for any actions you make. If at the age of 10 you can make choices that can hugely impact yours and someone else's future and claim responsibly for these choices why can't you make a choice at 16 that can do the same thing?
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    (Original post by rforrosie)

    how come Scottish 16/17 year olds can vote. Scotland must believe they are old enough so why can't we vote?
    They cannot vote for Parliament or in the EU referendum.

    The Scots have historically had a different law on minority and today the age of legal capacity in Scotland is 16.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of...land)_Act_1991

    In Singapore it is 21. Why does the fact that it is a different age in one country automatically mean the age adopted elsewhere is wrong?
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    (Original post by _aprildawn)
    The legal capabilities may change largely at 18 but how can you say they don't change more at a younger age? At the age of 10 you become criminally reasonable for any actions you make. If at the age of 10 you can make choices that can hugely impact yours and someone else's future and claim responsibly for these choices why can't you make a choice at 16 that can do the same thing?
    There are a larger basket of things that you can do at 18 than at 17 and 364 days than at any other pair of ages.

    The age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales of 10 is hardly an argument for 16 being so special to allow voting.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    18 is not unreasonable either. It is the age of majority and when in 1970 the age of majority was reduced to 18, the voting age followed. The difference between the legal capacities of someone before and after their 18th birthday is greater than any other life boundary.

    Biologically 16 is not significant for being a parent and in modern society (I accept that it was different in past generations), it is a poor exemplar because virtually all 16 year old parents today are either accidental parents or are making poor life choices.
    Your legal capacities do change hugely at 18 however they undergo arguably as large changes throughout your whole life. For example, at 10 you become legally responsible for your criminal actions. That means at 10, considered by most to be a young child, you are responsible for making choices that impact yours and others life's forever. Why shouldn't you be allowed to make lesser choices, though still with a huge impact, at 16?
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    (Original post by _aprildawn)
    Your legal capacities do change hugely at 18 however they undergo arguably as large changes throughout your whole life. For example, at 10 you become legally responsible for your criminal actions. That means at 10, considered by most to be a young child, you are responsible for making choices that impact yours and others life's forever. Why shouldn't you be allowed to make lesser choices, though still with a huge impact, at 16?
    😏😏😏
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There are a larger basket of things that you can do at 18 than at 17 and 364 days than at any other pair of ages.

    The age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales of 10 is hardly an argument for 16 being so special to allow voting.
    How is it hardly an argument, please explain the thought process behind this? To be truthful most of the things you can do at 18 hardly change your capability to vote
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    (Original post by _aprildawn)
    Your legal capacities do change hugely at 18 however they undergo arguably as large changes throughout your whole life. For example, at 10 you become legally responsible for your criminal actions. That means at 10, considered by most to be a young child, you are responsible for making choices that impact yours and others life's forever. Why shouldn't you be allowed to make lesser choices, though still with a huge impact, at 16?
    There has to be a binary division; not be able to vote/being able to vote and anyone who suggests change has to say why that binary division is better at that the age they prefer rather than any other. You haven't come close to doing so.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    They cannot vote for Parliament or in the EU referendum.

    The Scots have historically had a different law on minority and today the age of legal capacity in Scotland is 16.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of...land)_Act_1991

    In Singapore it is 21. Why does the fact that it is a different age in one country automatically mean the age adopted elsewhere is wrong?
    16/17 year olds can drive, have a child, get a job, fly abroad alone and buy a house but they can can't vote for their future in the EU😂
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    I would tell them straight: " We are leaving the EU. We are going to control our own borders. But we are going to continue to trade with the EU. You need us more than we need you."
    It's tough to negotiate good deals but with the right person in charge it's possible.
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    (Original post by _aprildawn)
    How is it hardly an argument, please explain the thought process behind this? To be truthful most of the things you can do at 18 hardly change your capability to vote
    Have full capacity to enter into a contract; receive an inheritance, borrow money (which means being able to have a charge card or credit card), rent a property, acquire property. Marry without parental consent. Join the armed forces without parental consent. Not be subject to the jurisdiction of the Courts concerning your welfare. Not be required to be in education or training. Have free access to licenced premises. But alcohol. Places bets with a bookmaker. Buy cigarettes

    In other words all the things adults take for granted and children assume they cannot do.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There has to be a binary division; not be able to vote/being able to vote and anyone who suggests change has to say why that binary division is better at that the age they prefer rather than any other. You haven't come close to doing so.
    The belief that 16-year-olds are unaware of the things going on around in the world around them is so far from right in this day it's laughable. The changes going on at this point in time are insane, and this is the reason the 16/17 demographic have become more aware, and more passionate about making the changes that are sure to take place changes for the better. Recently, it is the under 18s who have made huge changes within our world, compared to the over 18s who seem to decide to sit ideally by while letting the world fall into pieces around their feet. Malala Yousafzai, Jazz Jennings, and Mary Grace Henry just being a few examples of those younger willing to fight for their future, and change their own lives.
 
 
 
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