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How would you negotiate Brexit ? What would you do ? Watch

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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    If that situation comes about it's because we chose to place the integrity of our national institutions and borders over certain economic considerations. There's nothing humiliating about that. 'Doing better' is broader than pounds and pence, particularly short term pounds and pence.

    I must say I find it quite odd that someone who I assume identifies as left wing on economics appears to consider the be-all-and-end-all of 'doing well' to be how attractive the UK is to multinational corporations.
    I find it bizarre that so many who voted tory in 2015 because of the 'economy' decided to go 'I don't care about the economy' a year later.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    I find it bizarre that so many who voted tory in 2015 because of the 'economy' decided to go 'I don't care about the economy' a year later.
    They believe either it will be more or less the same anyway or better long term


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    (Original post by paul514)
    They believe either it will be more or less the same anyway or better long term
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    I'm not sure. I think there's a certain faction of brexiters who believe that Brexit is a rip roaring success before any real evidence*. For instance could you imagine the same right wingers viewing the devaluation of the pound in so favourable a light had it been caused by a labour administration?

    *I suppose there is some of that amongst the die hard remain side to be fair, although they tend not to be as evangelical about it as the Brexiters who (in all seriousness) compare Brexit to overthrowing a an oppressive colonial regime rather than leaving a occasionally ineffective and cumbersome but ultimately benovelent multilateral institution.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    arghhhh how many times?!
    The echr has nothing to do with the eu.
    Indeed, we should use the opportunity to exit anyway.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Indeed, we should use the opportunity to exit anyway.
    What opportunity? Brexit gives us no greater or lesser opportunity to leave the ECHR.
    Please do not conflate different European bodies.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    I'm not sure. I think there's a certain faction of brexiters who believe that Brexit is a rip roaring success before any real evidence*. For instance could you imagine the same right wingers viewing the devaluation of the pound in so favourable a light had it been caused by a labour administration?

    *I suppose there is some of that amongst the die hard remain side to be fair, although they tend not to be as evangelical about it as the Brexiters who (in all seriousness) compare Brexit to overthrowing a an oppressive colonial regime rather than leaving a occasionally ineffective and cumbersome but ultimately benovelent multilateral institution.
    Indeed. Imagine if we voted remain and the pound fell like it did.
    I guess all these hard line brexiteers would have gone 'ah great news, the pound was overvalued'.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Indeed, we should use the opportunity to exit anyway.
    What would you do instead of the echr? How would you ensure people don't lose their rights?
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    What opportunity? Brexit gives us no greater or lesser opportunity to leave the ECHR.
    Please do not conflate different European bodies.
    That's a technicality. It's highly unlikely that an EU member would be looked upon kindly if they continuously breached ECHR rulings. Further, since the rest are members they base EU law with that in mind.

    At any rate, i don't see why we need a foreign court to do a job that the supreme court is perfectly capable of doing.

    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Indeed. Imagine if we voted remain and the pound fell like it did.
    I guess all these hard line brexiteers would have gone 'ah great news, the pound was overvalued'.
    People who think that devaluations are the key to long term prosperity are idiots. Equally though, it's folly to think that those who voted Leave did not bear the economy in mind, i myself read extracts of the treasury and IMF reports and concluded that in the long run there was little effect (and based on Q3 and Q4 data it's looking like the median or best case scenarios will turn out rather than anything like the worst).
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    What would you do instead of the echr? How would you ensure people don't lose their rights?
    By doing what we did for centuries before that as our rights grew and were protected, pass an act of parliament.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    That's a technicality. It's highly unlikely that an EU member would be looked upon kindly if they continuously breached ECHR rulings. Further, since the rest are members they base EU law with that in mind.

    At any rate, i don't see why we need a foreign court to do a job that the supreme court is perfectly capable of doing.



    People who think that devaluations are the key to long term prosperity are idiots. Equally though, it's folly to think that those who voted Leave did not bear the economy in mind, i myself read extracts of the treasury and IMF reports and concluded that in the long run there was little effect (and based on Q3 and Q4 data it's looking like the median or best case scenarios will turn out rather than anything like the worst).
    I agree re devaluations. Surely they can lead to inflation as much of what we import becomes more expensive. The benefits of a strong currency outweigh the drawbacks.

    On a side note i'm interested in how the pound used to get two dollars, what were we doing so well then that America weren't?
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    I agree re devaluations. Surely they can lead to inflation as much of what we import becomes more expensive. The benefits of a strong currency outweigh the drawbacks.

    On a side note i'm interested in how the pound used to get two dollars, what were we doing so well then that America weren't?
    Currencies are relative and we were a larger part of the global economy. Bar the 90's the US has grown faster than us and therefore the pound has weakened against the dollar (albeit with some larger movements).

    I don't think this devaluation is permanent though, i expect a significant appreciation in 2019 regardless of the result due to certainty returning (assuming we don't end up with negotiations that never end).
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    Hi, since Brexit involves negotiations, i assume the EU will give us an awful deal like they did for Greece and others. My concern though is the priority of the negotiations - i.e will May end up having to make the UK pay loads for a trade deal but in return the UK get control of their borders. Or will she relax the immigration controls allowing EU citizens to freely enter and get a trade deal in return?
    Brexit means Brexit granted, independence controlling our own borders is right not at the expense of a bad deal though.
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    Access to single market

    No ECJ rulings, Supreme UK Court is THE highest court in all matters

    EU nationals have right to work and live here

    UK nationals have right to live and work in EU

    industries only of mutual importance and global importance will have no tariffs. ICT, medicine, construction, energy, transportation, manufacturing, education. Terms are renewed once every ten years in prevailing conditions.
 
 
 
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