Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Why do we use the phrase 'rainy day' when talking about when we should save money for?

    Surely, you do even less activities on a rainy day as it's raining, whereas on a summers day you would actually go out and do something? Therefore wouldn't it make more sense to say saving money for a summers day? :/

    Anyone know where the term comes from, or thoughts on this?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by delta-T)
    Why do we use the phrase 'rainy day' when talking about when we should save money for?

    Surely, you do even less activities on a rainy day as it's raining, whereas on a summers day you would actually go out and do something? Therefore wouldn't it make more sense to say saving money for a summers day? :/

    Anyone know where the term comes from, or thoughts on this?
    because
    when you have money
    :hat2:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by delta-T)
    Why do we use the phrase 'rainy day' when talking about when we should save money for?

    Surely, you do even less activities on a rainy day as it's raining, whereas on a summers day you would actually go out and do something? Therefore wouldn't it make more sense to say saving money for a summers day? :/

    Anyone know where the term comes from, or thoughts on this?
    Saving money for a "rainy day" doesn't refer to a day when you want to go out and do activities. It means a period when large unexpected costs hit you (e.g. flood damage to your house that you need to get repaired) or when you lose your regular source of income (e.g. nobody coming to buy anything from your ice cream van).

    In general, a rainy day is just a metaphor for difficult times, doom and gloom etc.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    It's an idiom isn't it , not meant to be taken literally .

    We also don't throw stones in glass houses , pull our fingers out , ride the petticoat tails ect ect ect :laugh:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    a rainy day is assumed to be gloomy and unpllesant, you are saving money for when times get unplesant and are bad
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Saving money for a "rainy day" doesn't refer to a day when you want to go out and do activities. It means a period when large unexpected costs hit you (e.g. flood damage to your house that you need to get repaired) or when you lose your regular source of income (e.g. nobody coming to buy anything from your ice cream van).

    In general, a rainy day is just a metaphor for difficult times, doom and gloom etc.
    Ahhh, it's a metaphor haha. Ok that makes sense thanks.
 
 
 
Poll
Favourite type of bread
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.