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How can mechanical engineering student apply a physics master? Watch

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    Hi,

    I am a mechanical engineering 3rd year student in Swansea University, Wales. However, I found I love physics, especially astronomy (astrophysics) actually. So are there any universities in the UK providing physics or astronomy master courses which can accept a mechanical engineering student like me?

    Thanks!
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    Have you actually looked this up as I'm sure there are though only a few. In terms of whether you'll be competitive or eligible to apply, you'll have to check entry requirements. Good luck!
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    Yeah I saw only few can accept engineering student. But anyway thanks for answering!
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    (Original post by SchneiderM)
    Hi,

    I am a mechanical engineering 3rd year student in Swansea University, Wales. However, I found I love physics, especially astronomy (astrophysics) actually. So are there any universities in the UK providing physics or astronomy master courses which can accept a mechanical engineering student like me?

    Thanks!
    Hello,

    If you would like some information about our Physics postgraduate courses please get in touch with us with the following link:

    [email protected]

    My colleagues should be able to forward you to someone from the department.
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    Word of advice coming from a Physicist: Read books on General relativity/spacetime and gravity in the Summer, these are quite mathematically demanding modules at uni and a good basis in the maths will increase your enjoyment of learning cosmology tenfold.
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    (Original post by GalaxyDestroyer)
    Word of advice coming from a Physicist: Read books on General relativity/spacetime and gravity in the Summer, these are quite mathematically demanding modules at uni and a good basis in the maths will increase your enjoyment of learning cosmology tenfold.
    Thanks for this advice! But could you recommend some books for me? Which books are most suitable for engineering students like me?
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    (Original post by SchneiderM)
    Thanks for this advice! But could you recommend some books for me? Which books are most suitable for engineering students like me?
    Andrew Liddle - An introduction to modern cosmology

    Rindler, W - Relativity: Special, general and cosmological.

    I recommend these not knowing the mathematical capability of Mechanical engineers. The Andrew Liddle is fantastic for all readers, but the second one assumes prior maths knowledge.

    In general for astrophysics you should know: differential equations, calculus (i.e differentiation/integration), matrices, taylor/binomial expansions (to make problems easier), algebraic manipulation, graph reading: i.e Hertzsprung Russell diagrams, rotational velocity curve graphs and probably the most prominent, derivation of laws/equations from zeroth principle.

    Most of these will probably come with practise during your Master's course as they start from basics (catering to a wide audience.)

    But I'm sure as a mech. engineer it will be no problem to you

    Astrophysics is not as mathematically demanding as say, theoretical physics, but there is a lot to learn and depending on what modules you take, you may have to do some prior reading on fundamental mathematics.

    You've made a good choice picking Astro, it is truly a beautiful field.
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    (Original post by GalaxyDestroyer)
    Andrew Liddle - An introduction to modern cosmology

    Rindler, W - Relativity: Special, general and cosmological.

    I recommend these not knowing the mathematical capability of Mechanical engineers. The Andrew Liddle is fantastic for all readers, but the second one assumes prior maths knowledge.

    In general for astrophysics you should know: differential equations, calculus (i.e differentiation/integration), matrices, taylor/binomial expansions (to make problems easier), algebraic manipulation, graph reading: i.e Hertzsprung Russell diagrams, rotational velocity curve graphs and probably the most prominent, derivation of laws/equations from zeroth principle.

    Most of these will probably come with practise during your Master's course as they start from basics (catering to a wide audience.)

    But I'm sure as a mech. engineer it will be no problem to you

    Astrophysics is not as mathematically demanding as say, theoretical physics, but there is a lot to learn and depending on what modules you take, you may have to do some prior reading on fundamental mathematics.

    You've made a good choice picking Astro, it is truly a beautiful field.
    thank you very much!
 
 
 
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