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OCR AL Psychology (New): Research methods H167/1 & H567/1 - 15 May & 07 Jun 2017 watch

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    (Original post by aruob)
    i read this online - in teachers support material that the studies had to be chosen in a certain way,- for instance, option 1 child psychology or criminal psychology and option 2 environmental or sports and exercise? is this how it is?
    secondly, determinism, for component 2 and 3?
    Well in the sample paper. Issues in mental health is compulsory and then you pick two options from the other topics
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    Does anyone have any 8 or more out of 10 answers for part A questions in component 3?
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    What section is part A? If it's issues in mental health then sorry, haven't started it yet.
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    I am also doing this specification and on the OCR website, the resources are fairly decent but anywhere else is not so good, there is a lack of recourses to be found. I should have done the AQA specification. The fact that less than half passed the AS exams (according to the stats page) makes me even more nervous. Any good revision advice would be much appreciated. My retention is terrible! I'm having to constantly revisit the core studies.
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    (Original post by ArranJones)
    I am also doing this specification and on the OCR website, the resources are fairly decent but anywhere else is not so good, there is a lack of recourses to be found. I should have done the AQA specification. The fact that less than half passed the AS exams (according to the stats page) makes me even more nervous. Any good revision advice would be much appreciated. My retention is terrible! I'm having to constantly revisit the core studies.
    Use Holah the website, covers most studies and all areas, debates and perspectives. Bear in mind you need to be able to gather all the info and just condense it. I would create an A3 document with all the information, then an A4 document, then flashcards and then a mindmap for each study. Takes some time but it works.

    I'm going to produce a large document for Section B that should have 90% of the answers. Will have information on all areas/debates/perspectives and their underlying principles, how each study links to them, strengths/weaknesses, application, similarities/differences and possibly a 12/15 mark answer for them. I got an A in AS through hard work so I'm hoping I could help us all out.

    But I'm going to need help on some questions that I lack knowledge on so would be good if some people can give input to my answers.
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    (Original post by Rtdsv)
    Use Holah the website, covers most studies and all areas, debates and perspectives. Bear in mind you need to be able to gather all the info and just condense it. I would create an A3 document with all the information, then an A4 document, then flashcards and then a mindmap for each study. Takes some time but it works.

    I'm going to produce a large document for Section B that should have 90% of the answers. Will have information on all areas/debates/perspectives and their underlying principles, how each study links to them, strengths/weaknesses, application, similarities/differences and possibly a 12/15 mark answer for them. I got an A in AS through hard work so I'm hoping I could help us all out.

    But I'm going to need help on some questions that I lack knowledge on so would be good if some people can give input to my answers.
    Thanks that's what I've been trying to do, I've bought some psychology books that are extremely concise, but not sure if it's enough as I think the specification is too brief. I did the AS mocks and did well, but that took up constant revision for about a year. I think section C is easier as it's just common sense, but they picked a nice area (developmental) in the AS exam and picked the social area for the specimen which leaves the other three areas, I'm terrible at biological - just think it's so boring. The problem is I have difficulty with knowing what is the most important parts and I literally do not want to not be able to answer one question in any of the three exams. In section B and C, the questions are quite predictable. Just set section A that I don't like, 35 marks and all that remembering seems a bit ridiculous to me. Research Methods is really easy and Applied Psychology is also not too bad. Thanks for the advice
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    Anyone planning to write essay plans questions, I've started doing it for paper 3. Any tips of writing effective essay plans?
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    (Original post by blueriver)
    Anyone planning to write essay plans questions, I've started doing it for paper 3. Any tips of writing effective essay plans?
    It'd be great to know how you're going about doing this? Do you mind sharing an example, because this seems like something that I would do as my more essay based subject's revision but I'm not sure how this would work for Psychology?
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    (Original post by Rtdsv)
    Use Holah the website, covers most studies and all areas, debates and perspectives. Bear in mind you need to be able to gather all the info and just condense it. I would create an A3 document with all the information, then an A4 document, then flashcards and then a mindmap for each study. Takes some time but it works.

    I'm going to produce a large document for Section B that should have 90% of the answers. Will have information on all areas/debates/perspectives and their underlying principles, how each study links to them, strengths/weaknesses, application, similarities/differences and possibly a 12/15 mark answer for them. I got an A in AS through hard work so I'm hoping I could help us all out.

    But I'm going to need help on some questions that I lack knowledge on so would be good if some people can give input to my answers.
    This sounds like a great idea! I'd be happy to give input where you need it. this would actually be so helpful!
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    (Original post by blueriver)
    Anyone planning to write essay plans questions, I've started doing it for paper 3. Any tips of writing effective essay plans?
    sounds like an amazing idea, would you please share how you are writing it, would be loads helpful.
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    (Original post by Awele18)
    Well in the sample paper. Issues in mental health is compulsory and then you pick two options from the other topics
    you know with all the other topics ie. criminal, child sports and environamtal, are we to chose 6 each i,e,=. all 6 for child, all 6 for criminal etc? your reply would mean much, thank you.
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    you choose 2 topics for example criminal and child then they will ask 1 question from any 6 areas, so you have to be prepared i guess :/ hope that helps.
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    (Original post by blueriver)
    you choose 2 topics for example criminal and child then they will ask 1 question from any 6 areas, so you have to be prepared i guess :/ hope that helps.
    Thank you, it does

    I was hoing everyone of us could share our notes how all of us are studing to help each other,
    this would also help us revise, could we do that?
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    Hey guys,

    Does anyone have any exemplar 15 markers or any techniques you use to answer them? Theyre the only ones I struggle with so any help would be appreciated.
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    OCR Psychology New Specification Resources:
    Revision on Debates: http:// .blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/debates.html

    Good Section C Help (at the bottom): http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/284835-...cher-guide.pdf

    Research Methods Key Terms - http://a2psychologyocrmissmith.blogs...key-terms.html

    Exam Structure and How to Gain Marks: http://www.holah.net/

    Research Methods Candidate Examples (New Spec): http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/237526-...ch-methods.pdf

    Core Studies Candidate Examples (New Spec):http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/283437-...swers-h567.pdf

    Crime Psych Example essays: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/304156-...le-answers.pdf

    Child Psych Example Essays: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/350206-...swers-h567.pdf

    Issues in Mental Health Example Essays: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/309114-...le-answers.pdf

    Sport/Exercise Example Essays: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/309115-...le-answers.pdf

    Enviro Example Essays: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/340186-...le-answers.pdf

    Report Writing Guide (Research Methods 'Design a procedure' questions) http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/270325-...r-students.pdf

    Revision Apps
    Quizlet **Highly Recommend (just type in OCR Psychology to the search bar of the app)
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    (Original post by MaxKingston1)
    Hey guys,

    Does anyone have any exemplar 15 markers or any techniques you use to answer them? Theyre the only ones I struggle with so any help would be appreciated.
    I did a 15 marker for a mock (I think it was 15...? xD) that I got full marks on (I think...it was a lot time ago) I'll type it up onto here when I'm free!
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    There's a published revision guide for this spec now - You can get it on amazon
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    We should form a groupchat or something and share notes and essays.... btw is it possible to get candidate A/A* answers apart from the OCR website?
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    These answers are from a Psychology Mock Paper I had done and was marked by my teacher. The mark it has recieved it next to the question. Feel free to use it as a source of revision!

    Describe two principles or concepts of psychodynamic perspective (4/4)
    The psychodynamic perspective asserts that our behaviour is influenced by our subconscious and unconscious dispositions e.g. through the 'Id' 'Ego' and the 'Superego'.
    One other principle is that all behaviours go through particular psychosexual stages of development in childhood in order to form the adult self. These include the oral stage, the anal stage and the phallic stage.

    Outline one reason why individual explanations of behaviour are useful. Support your answer with evidence from an appropriate core study. (4/4)
    One reason why they are useful is because they provide a more personal explanation of behaviour. This is because it suggests that our acitons area result of innate or biologically predisposed factors that aren't influenced by the environment, so it may help us to understand the behaviours of and sympathise more with those suffering from mentla health issues such as autism in Baron-Cohen's study, where Theory of Mins was identitfied to be an innate feature and not the influence of development or environment.

    Compare the psychodynamic perspective to the individual differences area. Use examples from appropriate core studies to support your answer (6/8)
    The psychodynamic perspective sees all behaviour as influenced by our predisposed subconscious and unconscious thoughts that are led by the Id, the Ego and the Super-ego. This is similar to 'individual differences' as it argues that behaviour is individual and unique to the person who is exhibiting it. For example, in Freud's study the psychodynamic perspective sees Little Hans' phobia as natural and a typical part of development as he passes through the Oral, Anal and Phallic (Oedipus) stages of development.

    Likewise, in individual differences, Little Hans' behaviour is unique to him in particular and comes as a result of particular and novel traits. Baron-Cohen's study in individual differences suggests that a lack of Theory of the Mind is natural to autistic patients, and Freud's psychodynamic perspective also sees behaviour as influenced by situational factors e.g. development or environment.

    Psychodynamic perspective is able to see all behaviour as subconscious in nature, as shown through Little Hans' subconscious attraction to his mother with fantasies and dream but individual differences does suggest that behaviour is a result of individual experiences e.g. Hancock's study into how Psychopaths who had murdered have different language traits to those who have not experienced the act.


    Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of conducting socially sensitive research in psychology. Use examples from appropriate core studies to support your answer. (15/15)
    Socially sensitive research refers to research that may be potentially controversial to society or that may have a big impact in controversial areas of debate. A strength of this is that the research conducted could have some positive practical applications.

    For example, Milgram's study had asserted that people are more obedient to destructive orders than we may think we are. As over 63% had administered a 450volt shock to the learner in comparison to the 1.2% predicted by the students prior. This is socially sensitive as it suggests that individuals have no influence (free-will) over their own behaviours and are morally ignorant, but its practical applications help to predict atrocities and inform people of their willingness to obey authority figures even when they may not truly agree with them. This is a positive aspect of socially sensitive research.

    However, it is possible that practical applications have weaknesses, as Yerke's study was applicable to science and helped support Eugenics, which could have been harmful to many religious and minority groups.

    One other strength is that it could help individuals to understand their own behaviour better. Freud's theory of psychosexual stages had been socially sensitive when first published as it had suggested quite inappropriate things about child development. However, it had also helped people to understand how the subconcious mind may influence out behaviour, actions and reactions to other individuals and situations (as shown through Little Hans' dreams and fantasies revolving around his mother. It also poses many societal strengths in terms of forming everyday concepts such as the 'Freudian Slip'. However, the socially sensitive research may also be unreliable and seek to generalise all behaviour as predictable. For example in Gould's study, he had disallowed black and immigrant Army Recruits from taking the Army Beta, but had sought to generalise their low intelligence score of 10.4 years to all black people through publication of findings, which could have been detrimental as although it enabled people to understand themselves a lot more, it had particularly bad effect on Government policy which took advantage of the results. This is a weakness of socially sensitive research as findings ay lead to unreliable generalisations of behaviour.

    Finally, socially sensitive research could help us to alter our behaviour, which is a strength. In Bocciaro's study, they found that people are less likely to whistleblow on unethical requests than we may think. This could enable us to reconsider our behaviour within the workplace and environment in general, as well as our attitudes towards authority as we are now more aware of our weaknesses, which is a key strength of socially senstitive research,
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    These answers are from a Psychology Mock Paper I had done and was marked by my teacher. The mark it has recieved it next to the question. Feel free to use it as a source of revision!

    Describe two principles or concepts of psychodynamic perspective (4/4)
    The psychodynamic perspective asserts that our behaviour is influenced by our subconscious and unconscious dispositions e.g. through the 'Id' 'Ego' and the 'Superego'.
    One other principle is that all behaviours go through particular psychosexual stages of development in childhood in order to form the adult self. These include the oral stage, the anal stage and the phallic stage.

    Outline one reason why individual explanations of behaviour are useful. Support your answer with evidence from an appropriate core study. (4/4)
    One reason why they are useful is because they provide a more personal explanation of behaviour. This is because it suggests that our acitons area result of innate or biologically predisposed factors that aren't influenced by the environment, so it may help us to understand the behaviours of and sympathise more with those suffering from mentla health issues such as autism in Baron-Cohen's study, where Theory of Mins was identitfied to be an innate feature and not the influence of development or environment.

    Compare the psychodynamic perspective to the individual differences area. Use examples from appropriate core studies to support your answer (6/8)
    The psychodynamic perspective sees all behaviour as influenced by our predisposed subconscious and unconscious thoughts that are led by the Id, the Ego and the Super-ego. This is similar to 'individual differences' as it argues that behaviour is individual and unique to the person who is exhibiting it. For example, in Freud's study the psychodynamic perspective sees Little Hans' phobia as natural and a typical part of development as he passes through the Oral, Anal and Phallic (Oedipus) stages of development.

    Likewise, in individual differences, Little Hans' behaviour is unique to him in particular and comes as a result of particular and novel traits. Baron-Cohen's study in individual differences suggests that a lack of Theory of the Mind is natural to autistic patients, and Freud's psychodynamic perspective also sees behaviour as influenced by situational factors e.g. development or environment.

    Psychodynamic perspective is able to see all behaviour as subconscious in nature, as shown through Little Hans' subconscious attraction to his mother with fantasies and dream but individual differences does suggest that behaviour is a result of individual experiences e.g. Hancock's study into how Psychopaths who had murdered have different language traits to those who have not experienced the act.


    Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of conducting socially sensitive research in psychology. Use examples from appropriate core studies to support your answer. (15/15)
    Socially sensitive research refers to research that may be potentially controversial to society or that may have a big impact in controversial areas of debate. A strength of this is that the research conducted could have some positive practical applications.

    For example, Milgram's study had asserted that people are more obedient to destructive orders than we may think we are. As over 63% had administered a 450volt shock to the learner in comparison to the 1.2% predicted by the students prior. This is socially sensitive as it suggests that individuals have no influence (free-will) over their own behaviours and are morally ignorant, but its practical applications help to predict atrocities and inform people of their willingness to obey authority figures even when they may not truly agree with them. This is a positive aspect of socially sensitive research.

    However, it is possible that practical applications have weaknesses, as Yerke's study was applicable to science and helped support Eugenics, which could have been harmful to many religious and minority groups.

    One other strength is that it could help individuals to understand their own behaviour better. Freud's theory of psychosexual stages had been socially sensitive when first published as it had suggested quite inappropriate things about child development. However, it had also helped people to understand how the subconcious mind may influence out behaviour, actions and reactions to other individuals and situations (as shown through Little Hans' dreams and fantasies revolving around his mother. It also poses many societal strengths in terms of forming everyday concepts such as the 'Freudian Slip'. However, the socially sensitive research may also be unreliable and seek to generalise all behaviour as predictable. For example in Gould's study, he had disallowed black and immigrant Army Recruits from taking the Army Beta, but had sought to generalise their low intelligence score of 10.4 years to all black people through publication of findings, which could have been detrimental as although it enabled people to understand themselves a lot more, it had particularly bad effect on Government policy which took advantage of the results. This is a weakness of socially sensitive research as findings ay lead to unreliable generalisations of behaviour.

    Finally, socially sensitive research could help us to alter our behaviour, which is a strength. In Bocciaro's study, they found that people are less likely to whistleblow on unethical requests than we may think. This could enable us to reconsider our behaviour within the workplace and environment in general, as well as our attitudes towards authority as we are now more aware of our weaknesses, which is a key strength of socially senstitive research,
    Wow thats amazing, congrats! btw which paper was this for?
 
 
 
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