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OCR AL Psychology (New): Research methods H167/1 & H567/1 - 15 May & 07 Jun 2017 Watch

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    (Original post by Virolite)
    idk but my answer was based on the fact that teacher's unlikely to observe discrimination if behaviour isn't encouraged..
    I said that few behaviours may be seen and more would be seen if the groups did differnt task, brown eyed group doing harder work out of their reach as then the brown eyed group would have more of a reason to ask for help and more of a reason to be discriminated agaisnt which should allow for easier observation if discrimating behaviour is increased
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    I said that few behaviours may be seen and more would be seen if the groups did differnt task, brown eyed group doing harder work out of their reach as then the brown eyed group would have more of a reason to ask for help and more of a reason to be discriminated agaisnt which should allow for easier observation if discrimating behaviour is increased
    they wen't allocated different tasks?
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    (Original post by Virolite)
    they wen't allocated different tasks?

    yeh thats how i changed it
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    for applied how likely do u think the topics on the specimen will come up?
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    ngl the core studies paper wouldve been a lot shorter if we just agreed psychology isn't a science lmao
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    (Original post by polaroidfilms)
    for applied how likely do u think the topics on the specimen will come up?
    Honestly is there anyway to predict with ocr?
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    Teachers discussed the paper here: http://www.resourcd.com/forum/show_discussion/7639
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    one of the teachers said implications isn't strenghs and weaknesses but pre sure these count
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    one of the teachers said implications isn't strenghs and weaknesses but pre sure these count
    I had acc only mentioned strengths because I wasn't too sure whether this was an evaluation Question but looking back I think I should have


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    How's everyone revising for Applied Psychology? Im so far behind I've been focusing on all my other exams.

    I feel like you don't even need to know the studys well, you have to be able to apply it to a debate, stem or topic overall so is there any point trying to learn the specific details?

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    Yes because some questions require an outline of the study which is most of the marks.
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    (Original post by Rtdsv)
    How's everyone revising for Applied Psychology? Im so far behind I've been focusing on all my other exams.

    I feel like you don't even need to know the studys well, you have to be able to apply it to a debate, stem or topic overall so is there any point trying to learn the specific details?

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    That's true to an extent. But you might need to describe the study in some accuracy in the 1st question they ask.

    i'm just reading the textbook and notes then repeating it outloud and from there it pretty much goes in...I think that's the only way to do it :/
    You would need to know quite a bit in terms of the background of the study/theory aswell (e.g. from other theorists who have done studies prior to the key research so that you can use them in the 2nd evaluation question). For this again i just read through the textbook and make a quick note of 1 or 2 extra studies. It's a lot of content especially when balancing other subjects though I know

    What topics are you doing? My school chose criminal and child psychology
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    lads any practise questions?
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    That's true to an extent. But you might need to describe the study in some accuracy in the 1st question they ask.

    i'm just reading the textbook and notes then repeating it outloud and from there it pretty much goes in...I think that's the only way to do it :/
    You would need to know quite a bit in terms of the background of the study/theory aswell (e.g. from other theorists who have done studies prior to the key research so that you can use them in the 2nd evaluation question). For this again i just read through the textbook and make a quick note of 1 or 2 extra studies. It's a lot of content especially when balancing other subjects though I know

    What topics are you doing? My school chose criminal and child psychology
    Im doing the same.

    How would you answer a b and c questions? And also is it worth writing notes for the key research with different debates

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    (Original post by Rtdsv)
    Im doing the same.

    How would you answer a b and c questions? And also is it worth writing notes for the key research with different debates

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    Nah I wouldnt say its worth doing that. Thats something that you could probably make up after you've revised everything.

    I had answered some part b and C questions on this thread in the past but they're probably lost on one of these pages so ill reupload them later


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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    Nah I wouldnt say its worth doing that. Thats something that you could probably make up after you've revised everything.

    I had answered some part b and C questions on this thread in the past but they're probably lost on one of these pages so ill reupload them later


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    Yeah thanks I'd really appreciate say model answers.

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    Part C
    *Daryl is a detective who believes he could improve the success of interviews with suspects. He suggested asking witnesses to sleep at the police station and playing them sounds known to have been audible at the time of the incident, such as dogs barking, traffic noise or music. The witness would then be woken up and re-interviewed. Discuss how a psychologist could investigate whether Daryl’s new interview technique could improve the collection of evidence [10]

    The psychologists could test whether Daryl’s interview technique could improve collection of evidence through a controlled experiment. Witnesses of a crime would be split into 2 groups and one would sleep at the police station with sounds of the crime scene playing throughout the night, whilst the other would not. The two groups would then be interviewed and asked to use in-depth reporting to describe the events of the crime. Memon and Highman’s research had shown that this method of Cognitive Reinstatement; where the interviewee would have been surrounded by sounds of the same environment that the crime was committed in; would lead to more information being gathered than any other method of interview technique. If the group who had gone through the technique at the police station had presented more information to the interviewer than the group who had not been through the process, then it would be evident that Daryl’s new technique could improve collection of evidence.

    However, if the experiment is being carried on in a police station the psychologist should be aware that possible extraneous variables could be the cause for more or less information being recalled e.g. the participants may feel more forced or obliged to remember things in order to make the interviewee (most likely a detective) happy.

    The psychologist could also consider using other methods of collecting evidence and compare it to the Cognitive Reinstatement method. Witnesses of a crime could be split into 4 groups and either take part in Cognitive Reinstatement technique (where they would sleep in the station and hear sounds audible at the time of the incident), Narrative Re-ordering techniques, reporting from a different perspective or in-depth reporting. The psychologists could then collect qualitative data and compare the amount of words spoken in each interview technique. If the Cognitive Reinstatement technique produces the most evidence, then Daryl’s technique can be supported. This allows for a valid comparison between methods however it ignores how different interviewer’s training and character may influence how much information is gathered in each situation – especially if the participants feel rushed at any point.

    The psychologist could try Daryl’s method as a form of hypnosis before interviewing. The sounds would be heard by one hypnotised group and one normal group whilst sleeping which would allow the witnesses to cognise what they are hearing. Those under hypnosis would be more likely to internalise the sounds and remember the events more easily during interviewing. However Sanders and Simmons study showed how those hypnotised in their study were in more of a suggestible state, and ended up recalling less information less accurately and were more likely to be misled which might mean that Daryl’s technique would lead to less valid information being collected as a whole.
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    PART A
    *Use the study by Barkley-Leveson and Galvan (2014) to explain how neuroscience can help us to understand differences between adolescent and adult brains [10]

    Barkley-Leveson and Galvan’s study had aimed to investigate the likelihood of adolescents and adults taking a gamble where they would either win or lose money based on an expected value. 11 young people and 22 adults had taken been offered $20 that they would be required to gamble for either $20 more or less. This be done through fMRI conditions, where the participants would view a spinner with a 50/50 chance of winning values up to +/-5. The adolescents and adults also had to declare how much money they receive on a monthly basis so that the experimenters could be sure that they were not influenced by their perceptions of money or the values that they give to it (which would differ from participant to participant).



    The study helped to understand the differences between adult and adolescent brains. They had found that adolescents and adults were just as likely to take a gamble when the expected value was 0 i.e. when they knew that they had nothing to lose within the 24 win/win or lose/lose conditions. This helps us to see how adults and young people tend to make the same decisions when they perceive the risks to be non-existent, regardless of their brain chemistry.



    However, they had found that there were significant differences when considering brain activity in both groups. Adolescents were more likely to take risks when the expected value was high. This means that they were more likely than adults to take a gamble when they saw that they had more to gain. Brain scans had shown significantly less activity in the amygdala (the area responsible for feeling fear) or the hippocampal region (for memory which would help the adolescent to remember past decisions and make more rational decisions based on them in the future) and more brain activity in the prefrontal cortex/lateral and medial lobes which would help decision making and emotion/linguistic processing in comparison to adults.



    Also, compared to adults, adolescents were found to have more brain activity on the left ventral striatum. This part of the brain is responsible for emotional responses. This includes the responses of pleasure and gratification which therefore indicates that adolescents had gained considerably more pleasure in risk-taking activities such as gambling than adults would, and suggests that overall, adolescents are more likely to see less consequences in taking part in risky activities than adults.
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    PART A
    *Use the study by Barkley-Leveson and Galvan (2014) to explain how neuroscience can help us to understand differences between adolescent and adult brains [10]

    Barkley-Leveson and Galvan’s study had aimed to investigate the likelihood of adolescents and adults taking a gamble where they would either win or lose money based on an expected value. 11 young people and 22 adults had taken been offered $20 that they would be required to gamble for either $20 more or less. This be done through fMRI conditions, where the participants would view a spinner with a 50/50 chance of winning values up to +/-5. The adolescents and adults also had to declare how much money they receive on a monthly basis so that the experimenters could be sure that they were not influenced by their perceptions of money or the values that they give to it (which would differ from participant to participant).



    The study helped to understand the differences between adult and adolescent brains. They had found that adolescents and adults were just as likely to take a gamble when the expected value was 0 i.e. when they knew that they had nothing to lose within the 24 win/win or lose/lose conditions. This helps us to see how adults and young people tend to make the same decisions when they perceive the risks to be non-existent, regardless of their brain chemistry.



    However, they had found that there were significant differences when considering brain activity in both groups. Adolescents were more likely to take risks when the expected value was high. This means that they were more likely than adults to take a gamble when they saw that they had more to gain. Brain scans had shown significantly less activity in the amygdala (the area responsible for feeling fear) or the hippocampal region (for memory which would help the adolescent to remember past decisions and make more rational decisions based on them in the future) and more brain activity in the prefrontal cortex/lateral and medial lobes which would help decision making and emotion/linguistic processing in comparison to adults.



    Also, compared to adults, adolescents were found to have more brain activity on the left ventral striatum. This part of the brain is responsible for emotional responses. This includes the responses of pleasure and gratification which therefore indicates that adolescents had gained considerably more pleasure in risk-taking activities such as gambling than adults would, and suggests that overall, adolescents are more likely to see less consequences in taking part in risky activities than adults.
    Hey im confused as to why the teenagers has more activity in pre frontal cortex, wouldnt they have less if they couldnt assess risks as well? can you explain this to me?
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    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    I have the paper but its too big to upload.

    Anyway to change the size?
    Anyway of getting it on here or could you email it me? Any help much appreciated
 
 
 
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