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OCR AL Psychology (New): Research methods H167/1 & H567/1 - 15 May & 07 Jun 2017 Watch

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    anyone else just about ready to cry
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    (Original post by BEARichards)
    anyone else just about ready to cry
    yeah, of joy :') i love rm
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    (Original post by StressedCoffee)
    Hey I know this is about the last exam but does anybody know how background might be asked about in the applied exam. Going through notes and everything I just see that they give so much information on background! How much do we really need to know?
    are you referring to background reasearch?
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    (Original post by schoolgirl1)
    Super good answer! Well structured and you answered all the points!! I would watch out with getting carried away where you don't need to, in your para about opportunity sampling! You started by saying you would use an opportunity sample and you explained HOW which is really important! Then you gave a positive ... and then you contradicted you point by saying that it may cause problems!! This is great psychology knowledge and all, but just make sure you stick to the question and what it asks you to do! You probably wont have time in the exam either! General structure of paras that I tend to use is: Refer to bullet point and say which you will use, then state an advantage of using this or a disadvantage of the option you did not choose - in context to question, then say about previous research you conducted and say what it was about and say which method you chose in that research and how it made the results better (an advantage) or how it wasn't effective (a disadvantage) and then say therefore I will use .... in my self-report on .....
    Some suggestions for your answer:

    I would use opportunity sampling to gather a sample from a clinic of around 40 males and females. Opportunity sampling would help to gather an accurate target population and avoid interviewing individuals who do not meet my criteria. My study at school (also I would maybe say "In previous research I have conducted" sounds more professional haha)- then you need to give a little context of what you did in the self-report, just as you did on the previous paragraphs! used an opportunity sample of sixth-form students who were all available at the time, which made it easier to gather a quick sample. Therefore I will obtain an opportunity sample for my self-report on why females responded better than males on a new treatment for anorexia.

    hope this helped
    You give the best feedback (even better than my teacher who literally just said 'This is a Level 4, well done!' -_-
    Thank you so much! I seee, so in these questions your not supposed to state BOTH pros and cons of your choice? I thought that it was an evaluation requirement AO3 but if we don't have to do it then thats so much better!
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    Hey In the 15 markers do u need a separate paragraph explainging the procedure because if this isnt one of the points to be covered how dot he examiners know what ur even doing??!
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    Hey In the 15 markers do u need a separate paragraph explainging the procedure because if this isnt one of the points to be covered how dot he examiners know what ur even doing??!
    Yeah I was wondering that too but you literally get 0 marks for explaining procedure. You will be given a stimulus and the examiner just knows to link it to that tbh.

    What you need to make sure to do is, when you state your choice make sure you link it to the context of the stimulus. E.g. if your stimulus is about studying eating behaviour at a restaurant and you choose participant observation, make sure you say in a few words how this would work/how your set up would look e.g. would you be sitting in front of or to the side of the participant in the restaurant (that is your context) You don't need to explain the procedure according to the mark scheme and because I did that last year and got like no marks for that part
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    (Original post by StressedCoffee)
    Hey I know this is about the last exam but does anybody know how background might be asked about in the applied exam. Going through notes and everything I just see that they give so much information on background! How much do we really need to know?
    You just need a few names and concepts, not all of it. So just maybe 2 or three names and make sure to learn what they say about the topic. They don't ask explicitly about background but you will need it for question 2 and 3 to back up your points and the best way to do that by using names

    Hope that helps?
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    (Original post by BEARichards)
    anyone else just about ready to cry
    I was ok until I opened a research methods specimen paper and saw 3 core study related questions in the multiple choice part and remembered that they could actually do that :facepalm:
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    The mark schemes are just baffling. What do i need to say to get the marks? I dont know. I dont think OCR know. Im just waffling on and on with no idea whats going on

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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    Yeah I was wondering that too but you literally get 0 marks for explaining procedure. You will be given a stimulus and the examiner just knows to link it to that tbh.

    What you need to make sure to do is, when you state your choice make sure you link it to the context of the stimulus. E.g. if your stimulus is about studying eating behaviour at a restaurant and you choose participant observation, make sure you say in a few words how this would work/how your set up would look e.g. would you be sitting in front of or to the side of the participant in the restaurant (that is your context) You don't need to explain the procedure according to the mark scheme and because I did that last year and got like no marks for that part
    Thank you! Hopefully if i cut down on explaing the whole thing i will have a better and clearer answer, could u take a look at my answer for the spec paper 15 markers as i really stuggled and my teacher said i would only get half marks but didnt say why
    Sorry if the pictures arent great, it starts on Question 23 which is labelled i think
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    useless.
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    (Original post by Virolite)
    useless.
    why is my answer useless??
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    Thank you! Hopefully if i cut down on explaing the whole thing i will have a better and clearer answer, could u take a look at my answer for the spec paper 15 markers as i really stuggled and my teacher said i would only get half marks but didnt say why
    Sorry if the pictures arent great, it starts on Question 23 which is labelled i think
    This is really good I don't know the mark scheme well enough to give it a mark but it seems like around a 13 maybe 14. I would say to get full marks you could have cut out the first part where you're explaining location etc which would have given you more time to elaborate on some evaluation points. e.g. You could have offered a reason why non-participant observations 'wouldn't be good for this type of study because...'. It would give you more justification and increase your A03 score. Overall it's a really clear answer and you've consistently mentioned your own research (maybe make sure to always do a one-liner linking back to the question explicitly. You do it for the most part but sometimes it's missing. E.g. try: 'I did this study at my at college using naturalistic observation etc which was good because etc which means that it would be a valuable method to use when investigating the context of personal space.'
    Definitely a level 4 high answer though
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    This is really good I don't know the mark scheme well enough to give it a mark but it seems like around a 13 maybe 14. I would say to get full marks you could have cut out the first part where you're explaining location etc which would have given you more time to elaborate on some evaluation points. e.g. You could have offered a reason why non-participant observations 'wouldn't be good for this type of study because...'. It would give you more justification and increase your A03 score. Overall it's a really clear answer and you've consistently mentioned your own research (maybe make sure to always do a one-liner linking back to the question explicitly. You do it for the most part but sometimes it's missing. E.g. try: 'I did this study at my at college using naturalistic observation etc which was good because etc which means that it would be a valuable method to use when investigating the context of personal space.'
    Definitely a level 4 high answer though
    Aw thank you so much! i was frealking out about tomrrow but you;ve put me at ease and your feed back is really helpful! So when explaining "how" to do something such as covert observation how much of the procedure details do you need? as i always feel that by just addressing the points i don't fully explain how to do the study!
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    Aw thank you so much! i was frealking out about tomrrow but you;ve put me at ease and your feed back is really helpful! So when explaining "how" to do something such as covert observation how much of the procedure details do you need? as i always feel that by just addressing the points i don't fully explain how to do the study!
    So you have you would say:
    I would use a covert observation and stand behind a bar in a nightclub within a rural village and then an urban city location; making sure to write down any personal space based behaviours.
    This is because this method allows for...Whereas overt observation doesnt.
    My school study that investigated (hypothesis/aim) also used covert observation
    This helped to...
    Therefore it would be the best method to use when investigating personal space behaviours in both urban and rural Environments.

    So basically, the only procedure or contextual information you should include in the first sentence, quickly explaining where what your role will be with this method.

    Mark scheme for this questions says:
    'There are no additional marks for contextualising the justification of the chosen observational techniques' Therefore you don't need to say 'covert observation helps avoid observer effect which would (in an overt observation) be obvious in a nightclub if someone was staring at you etc etc.
    but you DO have to set your scene quickly at the beginning of your paragraph as I have shown above. That's all the procedure you need!
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    (Original post by LenniesRabbit)
    So you have you would say:
    I would use a covert observation and stand behind a bar in a nightclub within a rural village and then an urban city location; making sure to write down any personal space based behaviours.
    This is because this method allows for...Whereas overt observation doesnt.
    My school study that investigated (hypothesis/aim) also used covert observation
    This helped to...
    Therefore it would be the best method to use when investigating personal space behaviours in both urban and rural Environments.

    So basically, the only procedure or contextual information you should include in the first sentence, quickly explaining where what your role will be with this method.

    Mark scheme for this questions says:
    'There are no additional marks for contextualising the justification of the chosen observational techniques' Therefore you don't need to say 'covert observation helps avoid observer effect which would (in an overt observation) be obvious in a nightclub if someone was staring at you etc etc.
    but you DO have to set your scene quickly at the beginning of your paragraph as I have shown above. That's all the procedure you need!
    Okay thank you so much!! goood luck for tomorrow! xx
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    Hi everyone! This is a 15 marker I did today in 16 mins- if someone could have a look and let me know what they think I would be super grateful!! Beginning to panic a lot about tomorrow now

    Questionnaires are often used to assess people attitudes to current events and to factors affecting attitude change. Psychologists have obtained information on such diverse topics as attitudes to body image and attitudes to drinking and driving this information has enabled research in to the factors affecting attitude to change. Explain how you would carry out a questionnaire into ‘Attitudes to parental discipline’. Justify your decisions as part of your explanation, you must refer to: • Open and closed questions
    • At least one ethical issue
    • Socially desirable answers
    • Bar charts.
    You should use your own experience of carrying out a self-report to inform your response. (15)

    In order to investigate attitudes to parental discipline. I would use both open and closed questions. An example of an open question in my questionnaire may be “Describe the methods you feel are appropriate for parents to use when disciplining their children” and an example of a closed question (specifically a Likert scale question) would be “Please indicate on this scale how far you agree with the statement ‘it is acceptable to discipline your children using physical violence’: 1 (strongly agree) 2 3 4 5 (strongly disagree)”. Open questions are useful because they allow for rich data collection- the respondent is not confined by certain choices and can fully express their opinions and views, allowing for more valid conclusions to be obtained. Closed questions are also advantageous as it is easier to analyse them and the answers can be displayed in graphs so that the researcher can make objective conclusions such as, for example “the majority of people strongly disagree that physical violence is an acceptable method of discipline for children.” When I conducted my own self report investigation into the ways in which students deal with stress, I only used open questions, and I found that the data I collected was too detailed and personalised for me to be able to analyse it carefully and draw reliable conclusions, as my interpretations tended to be influenced by subjectivity. Therefore, it would be more useful to have a mixture of both open and closed questions.

    One ethical issue with questionnaires is confidentiality. Participants may not want their identities to be disclosed and may not want their answers to be identifiable, and it is important to respect these wishes. Therefore, participant codes could be used instead of names, so that each answer can be linked to the other answers from the same participant, but their name/personal details and confidentiality are not compromised. In my own self-report investigation into stress, I assigned each participant a code and did not ask them to disclose their name/age/gender to me. This was a strength and it ensured the participant felt respected and felt as though they could trust me with honest (and consequently valid) answers.

    Social desirability bias can occur in self-report. This is where participants change their answers to seem more “socially acceptable”- for example, a participant in this self-report study may strongly believe that physical violence is an acceptable form of discipline, but may worry that others would judge them for this response, so they may instead say that they disagree with the statement. To reduce the risk of this occurring, when asking for consent from participants I would ask them to be as honest as possible in their answers and I would assure them that their answers would not be shared with anyone and they would not be able to be identified by their answers. This may encourage them to give more honest and reliable answers.

    To display the data obtained from the closed questions in my study, I would use a bar chart. This is because the data would be in discrete categories/nominal (for example, the number of participants that strongly agree that violence is an acceptable form of discipline.) This would allow me (and other researchers) to quickly draw conclusions from the data - when I conducted a second self-report study into the social media habits of teenagers, I used bar charts to display data from closed questions and was able to easily and quickly conclude that the favourite social media website or app of respondents was Twitter. Other researchers could look at the bar chart and objectively make similar conclusions.
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    (Original post by clairebear101)
    why is my answer useless??
    would've quoted you if I was commenting on your essay bro
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    Anyone have any generic 'in my own study i did...' because i literally forgot my old experiments plus we never did many
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    (Original post by blueriver)
    Anyone have any generic 'in my own study i did...' because i literally forgot my old experiments plus we never did many
    Literally just make it up, come up with some ideas for experiments, observations and self report and just use that when stating advs and disadvs of certain methods e.g. "in my experiment into the effect of noise on memory, I used repeated measures. This was advantageous as it helped to reduce participant variables, such as the participant's general memory abilities"
 
 
 
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