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    I have an interview for a phd program in a couple of weeks, and am struggling with a presentation I have to give on my research as part of the interview. They apparently want to see that you can present your scientific research concisely, but I think they're going a bit far...

    The instructions are that it is 3 minutes (!) and you can only have 3 power-point slides consisting of an introduction, results and a summary.

    But I'm not sure what they mean by a summary? In the given time the introduction and results can be little more than a summary anyway, so...:dontknow: Or do they maybe mean like conclusions?

    Any help? Tips for how to give a good presentation in 3 measely minutes are also welcome.
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    I did a 5 minute presentation on my masters dissertation for my PhD so it is possible to give a short and sweet one (though I think the 3 slide rule is a little silly in my opinion).

    By summary I assume they mean a summary of your conclusions. Really focus on one aspect of your research such as one particularly interesting result. If they question the scope of the research then you can talk about some other points after politely pointing out you focussed on one aspect due to the time / slide constraints. If you just list a bunch of findings it will be boring and confusing.

    In my presentation I focussed on the motivation behind my project as my methods were relatively novel and I left out the actual results (in your case, I wouldn't do that as they explicitly ask for them I'm just saying focussing on one aspect is effective). I also tailored it to my audience. My project was on ecological statistics and I was moving into psychological statistics so I kept everything pretty basic as I wasn't talking to people with in-depth knowledge of my research area.
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    I did a 5 minute presentation on my masters dissertation for my PhD so it is possible to give a short and sweet one (though I think the 3 slide rule is a little silly in my opinion).

    By summary I assume they mean a summary of your conclusions. Really focus on one aspect of your research such as one particularly interesting result. If they question the scope of the research then you can talk about some other points after politely pointing out you focussed on one aspect due to the time / slide constraints. If you just list a bunch of findings it will be boring and confusing.

    In my presentation I focussed on the motivation behind my project as my methods were relatively novel and I left out the actual results (in your case, I wouldn't do that as they explicitly ask for them I'm just saying focussing on one aspect is effective). I also tailored it to my audience. My project was on ecological statistics and I was moving into psychological statistics so I kept everything pretty basic as I wasn't talking to people with in-depth knowledge of my research area.
    Thanks, that's very helpful.

    I think I could do it well in 5 minutes, but 3 minutes is really tight. Any how, think I have a rough draft more or less sorted-sticking very basic and narrowed in on the main method-based results (as it involved testing 2 methods alongside other stuff) then can expand on it if asked. Think that is a sound strategy.
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    (Original post by heidigirl)
    I have an interview for a phd program in a couple of weeks, and am struggling with a presentation I have to give on my research as part of the interview. They apparently want to see that you can present your scientific research concisely, but I think they're going a bit far...

    The instructions are that it is 3 minutes (!) and you can only have 3 power-point slides consisting of an introduction, results and a summary.

    But I'm not sure what they mean by a summary? In the given time the introduction and results can be little more than a summary anyway, so...:dontknow: Or do they maybe mean like conclusions?

    Any help? Tips for how to give a good presentation in 3 measely minutes are also welcome.

    Hi!,

    For my PhD programme, I had a similar presentation as part of the interview stage. I'd like to think that it was successful as I am currently in the middle of my second year!

    I'd advice that your presentation be driven on three things- focus, detail and clarity. (Detail might seem quite unnatural when put vis-a-vis the number of minutes you have to present on, but it is possible to put a good amount of detail within a three minute presentation).

    Introduce the topic. Briefly say your motivation for it, the novelty in the topic. State the aim and connect it to at most two objectives. State two methodologies for each objectives. Present a summary of results (which can be two/three bullet points of information).

    Have a diagram, maybe two that is linked to the topic. Ensure that each slide flows, that is, leads to the next slide.

    You are basically reading out what is on your slide, not explaining anything. Any explanation will be outside the 3 minutes period, essentially the Q&A session. Offer answers when asked questions, be specific with your answers. If you do not know the answer, clearly state, "I would have a look at that much later, could I send you more information after I have done the research if that is fine?" Or something along that line.

    But do not give an "I do not know" response to all the questions!

    Have one or two intelligent questions for them. Stay engaging, exude confidence and you will leave a good impression. It is that impression that speaks for you after you leave the room- that contributes a great deal in their eventual decision making.

    I hope it goes well!
 
 
 
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