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    It's all in the title really, which would you say is better for programming/a computer science course in general?
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    PC my friend - provided you get a decent one.
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    PC.

    You'd have problems as some apps required for your modules won't work properly on a Mac and you'd waste valuable study/assignment time fixing it. & IT staff in the uni will be more familiar with PCs than Mac, so they won't be able to help you.

    Unless the apps are designed for Macs. Check with your module tutor.
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    Which ever you will feel happiest and most productive working on coupled with being the least source of frustration for you. Also consider your budget.

    If money is no object, and you like the mac ecosystem and support structure buy a mac.

    If money is a factor, you can live happily with the windows ecosystem then get a windows computer, don't stretch your budget for a mediocre mac option when you can buy a considerably better windows system for the same money unless you feel you have to work in the mac ecosystem.

    If you prefer the windows ecosystem, well then you probably wouldn't be asking.

    You should also look at your courses material to see what they teach programming in. A good course will be geared towards users of both systems.

    One big advantage of windows though is Visual Studio which is completely free.

    Me personally, I'm going to be rocking a windows device, mostly because I can't abide the mac tax of paying so much more spec for spec than a windows system, but also I just find macOS irritating, maybe it's years of being accustomed to windows, but nothing feels like it's where it should be.
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    Windows PC, because you can develop apps for most other platforms from Windows, but it's difficult to develop apps for Windows from other platforms because Windows is such a closed platform by comparison.

    Also, OS X is based on Unix, which is still very similar to the Linux kernel, so an app that you create for Linux will probably work well on OS X(so long as you package it appropriately of course). And most Linux distros are free.
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    PC all the way.
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    And none mentioned bootcamp? Strange...
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    (Original post by Recont)
    And none mentioned bootcamp? Strange...
    I thought about that, but they might face some performance issues. Also, they'd have to buy a Windows license on top of buying the Mac device, which could be rather costly.
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    (Original post by Jazzyboy)
    I thought about that, but they might face some performance issues. Also, they'd have to buy a Windows license on top of buying the Mac device, which could be rather costly.
    Anyone really buying Windows for home use?
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    (Original post by Recont)
    And none mentioned bootcamp? Strange...
    Just to add more info if OP considers Bootcamp to use both Windows and iOS:
    • You can install and use Windows (10 also) without a license key, you'll only be restricted on the personalization of the session (Control Panel >> Appearance and Personalization won't be accessible).
    • With Bootcamp, you'll have to split the drive space in two (you'll have to allocate how much each OS can use).
    • You'll have to restart the computer each time you want to switch OS.
    • You'll have to cope with the high DPI problems in Windows (most common Windows applications don't support high DPI screens, but IDEs and text editors for programming should be fine).
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    (Original post by Recont)
    Anyone really buying Windows for home use?
    I've got several versions of Windows and Linux.
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    (Original post by MartyO)
    Just to add more info if OP considers Bootcamp to use both Windows and iOS:
    • You can install and use Windows (10 also) without a license key, you'll only be restricted on the personalization of the session (Control Panel >> Appearance and Personalization won't be accessible).
    • With Bootcamp, you'll have to split the drive space in two (you'll have to allocate how much each OS can use).
    • You'll have to restart the computer each time you want to switch OS.
    • You'll have to cope with the high DPI problems in Windows (most common Windows applications don't support high DPI screens, but IDEs and text editors for programming should be fine).
    Or it is possible to use parallels. DPI problem also appears with PCs with high resolutions.
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    (Original post by ThePricklyOne)
    I've got several versions of Windows and Linux.
    Did you buy them?
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    (Original post by Recont)
    And none mentioned bootcamp? Strange...
    If his chosen course needs windows, then he's better off buying a windows computer than paying over the odds for mac hardware and then running windows on it. It only makes sense to buy the mac if you like the macOS.

    If his chosen course doesn't need windows and he can run either windows or macOS, then it doesn't matter that you can use bootcamp to put windows on the mac, he won't need to. It still only makes sense to buy a mac if you like macOS.

    His choice boils down to:

    Does the course need windows? Buy windows
    Is he on a limited budget and doesn't prefer macOS to windows? Buy windows
    Does he prefer macOS to windows? Buy a mac
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    I use both. I prefer using a Mac for most things but if you use a Mac you'll most likely need Windows if you do modules involving graphics (though this depends on what the modules entail).

    With general programming work in Java and so on it won't really matter which platform you use, just make sure your programs can run on Windows though before you hand them in, you won't want to lose marks for importing a library that won't run on Windows.

    I'd recommend speaking to your lecturers to find out what they want you to use and for you to find out if most of the software you'll be using will be multi platform or not.
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    PC. I recommend Sabertooth Systems.
 
 
 
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