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Do I have to take medicine to specify in a study of medicine e.g. Chiropody watch

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    I've always been interested in studying medicine but studying a degree in medicine for 6 years without specifying doesn't really appeal to me. I'd much prefer to specify in chiropody for example, my girlfriends brother took a scholarship in chiropody and now has a full time job as a podiatrist - This is where I would like to be but very few universities do degrees in these I'm only coming across medicine . So my question is, is medicine a "general" study is the content scattered across different aspects of medicine as I'd much rather focus on one area of medicine. Will medicine work out better for me than a degree focusing on one area?

    Edit: Im in year 12 studying Biology, Chemistry and Art and came with 6 A*s, 2 As and a B at GCSE, I'm predicted AAA at A level based on my GCSEs
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    (Original post by Gingeyy)
    I've always been interested in studying medicine but studying a degree in medicine for 6 years without specifying doesn't really appeal to me. I'd much prefer to specify in chiropody for example, my girlfriends brother took a scholarship in chiropody and now has a full time job as a podiatrist - This is where I would like to be but very few universities do degrees in these I'm only coming across medicine . So my question is, is medicine a "general" study is the content scattered across different aspects of medicine as I'd much rather focus on one area of medicine. Will medicine work out better for me than a degree focusing on one area?
    Yes, medicine is a very broad degree, you will learn about medicine, surgery, psychiatry, paediatrics, obstetrics, gynaecology, public health, anaesthetics etc.

    Specialising as a doctor takes many years after you've finished medical school. If you want to finish your degree and walk straight into work as a podiatrist without any need for further specialty training you should do a podiatry degree, not a medical degree.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Yes, medicine is a very broad degree, you will learn about medicine, surgery, psychiatry, paediatrics, obstetrics, gynaecology, public health, anaesthetics etc.

    Specialising as a doctor takes many years after you've finished medical school. If you want to finish your degree and walk straight into work as a podiatrist without any need for further specialty training you should do a podiatry degree, not a medical degree.
    Thank you for the response, if I was to specialise as a doctor where would I go about doing so? Would I continue at uni? I've also been looking at becoming a paramedic but I'm unsure if it would be best doing a degree for that or medicine as I'm struggling to find many universities that do one
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    (Original post by Gingeyy)
    Thank you for the response, if I was to specialise as a doctor where would I go about doing so? Would I continue at uni? I've also been looking at becoming a paramedic but I'm unsure if it would be best doing a degree for that or medicine as I'm struggling to find many universities that do one
    Medical school trains doctors - not paramedics/nurses/podiatrists/anyone else.

    So if you want to be a paramedic, you have to do a degree in paramedic science (as far as I'm aware).

    When you finish medical school you start work as a junior doctor. So you are no longer a student, you work in hospital or in the community, earning money whilst you train and eventually pick a speciality. So no, it's not uni based.

    You might find this website useful:

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Medical school trains doctors - not paramedics/nurses/podiatrists/anyone else.

    So if you want to be a paramedic, you have to do a degree in paramedic science (as far as I'm aware).

    When you finish medical school you start work as a junior doctor. So you are no longer a student, you work in hospital or in the community, earning money whilst you train and eventually pick a speciality. So no, it's not uni based.

    You might find this website useful:

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles
    Thank you for being so helpful, I've left it quite late to begin research into medicine but I'm beginning now, thats cleared a few things up for me thanks
 
 
 
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