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    Hi everyone!

    I know that this time last year I was hoping I could find someone willing to honestly talk about how their first year of LSE is going to help me make my choice about where to place as my first choice for uni, so I thought I'd make a forum in case anybody has any questions. I'm an LSE first year from the North of England originally studying government. Ask me anything!
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    Is the social life as **** as everyone says? Are the Chinese/international students very cliquey? How does your social life compare to your friends at other universities?

    Is the workload really tough? How often do you have to do all-nighters or catch up with revision/studying/homework on the weekends?

    Do you have time for a job? For how many hours a week do most people work?

    What are your opinions/perceptions on the different accommodations (including others as well as your own)? Does social life / attitude to work / enjoyment vary with accommodation?

    Do people on the minimum maintenance loan struggle? How do you manage the cost of living + rent?

    These are a lot of questions but I would appreciate any that you answer. I am trying to decide whether I will insure UCL or LSE for Econ (pending a response from UCL).
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    Are there many mature students? Thinking of applying for a second degree
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    How does the accommodation process work?
    What are the pros and cons of the different halls? How far is each hall from the lectures/lessons?
    How is the social life at LSE?
    What happened during freshers week? (Was it easy to make friends, are most people party animals etc)
    Are people unfriendly and is the environment as corporate as people say?
    Do you regret going there or do you enjoy it?

    I don't know whether I should firm LSE or reapply to somewhere else like st Andrews or Cambridge next year...
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    Hi everyone, sorry for the delay. Hopefully this will answer your questions and be of some use to you!

    Social Life: I find that your social life is what you make it. You live in London, one of the busiest cities in the world, and so there’s always a lot to do, and once you crack it you can always find things that are free/relatively affordable. There’s so many clubs and a lot of them offer student discounts. For me I’ve found it okay to fit time off from working around studying, but there’s obviously times when you need to prioritize studies. It’s very different to a typical night at home so we tend to mix between going to the bar/pub for a drink and then once a week we’ll try and have a proper night out. I’ve found that I’m not going on nights out as much as my friends at Leeds etc. but it’s really up to you.

    International Students: Certain international students definitely group up and isolate themselves a little. There’s a lot of international students at LSE, as you’d imagine, and in all honesty I do find there to be a divide between home and UK students at times. This of course isn’t the case for all students, and I’ve found lots are willing to mingle and be really social so it varies.

    Workload: I study government so my week-to-week work is usually just a load of reading/prep for lectures and classes with essays about every 4 weeks. I have 12 hours of contact time for my subject a week made up of a mix of lectures and classes. I do feel like I have more work than my friends at other unis and I do get stressed sometimes, but I don’t find it unmanageable (though there has been 2/3 all nighters since September which I don’t think is too bad). It's hard and the uni definitely pushes you, but I find that if I dedicate my free time during the day and plan ahead I’m usually okay, if a bit tired. Sometimes you just have to prioritize certain subjects over others and accept that it won’t be done in time (which as a bit of a control freak I found hard to do at first).

    Jobs: I have a Saturday job which is only 7 hours a week and I find it okay to balance work around that. Some of my friends here work about 20 hours a week but it’s quite rare to find people who work more than that. I imagine it would be quite hard to balance a lot of shifts and the workload, and the uni definitely discourages you from working more than 18 hours a week (not that they’d know if you did).

    Accommodation: TBH I don’t know a lot about the other halls, but the hall I live in (Bankside) is very social (the only LSE hall with a proper bar which is great for socializing and offers cheap drinks). I have a single room with a bathroom that I share with one other person and that’s £205 p.w. including one meal per day and it’s about a 20 minute walk from campus/similar length bus ride. Roseberry hall is also meant to be really social and is a lot more close-knit than Bankside because it’s relatively small (Bankside is 600+). My hall is also in a really good area, by the Tate Modern and Globe so it’s a lovely area to live. In all honesty I’ve not heard great things about the UoL intercollegiate halls, most people who I know that live there say they’re pretty dead and unsociable which isn’t the best considering most people make their friends in halls. The Urbanest buildings are amazing (Westminster’s views are so good) but pretty expensive and not very social too. You can apply for accommodation once you have firmed your offer and you choose five options from the list of halls/room types in preference order, and say what is most important for you to have. LSE then gets back to you within two weeks letting you know what hall and room type you’ll be in for September and you’ll then have to pay a deposit if you get in on results day of £250, if I remember correctly.

    Living Costs: Being from the North I definitely found moving to London hard to adjust to; it can be mega expensive and unfortunately things like nights out aren’t always very affordable due to having to pay for entry, drinks etc. (pre drinks are life). However, I’m pretty lucky as due to my family circumstances I get a decent maintenance loan and a bursary from LSE; the uni automatically considers from your student finance information whether you’re deserving of a bursary and there’s also a lot of scholarships you can apply to. Some friends have the minimum loan and it’s definitely tough but they just try to not spend on takeaway food/take public transport as much/try to drink in our cheaper bar as opposed to buying drinks when out. Once you find where the cheap places and best deals are you’ll survive, but it’s obviously harder than it would in a northern uni.

    Mature Students: Lots of mature students, especially in my hall!

    Freshers: LSE have their RAG events which is basically a week of nights out and daytime activities organised by the SU people. These are cheesy but most of them are decent and they’re a good way of meeting people/making friends/getting drunk and making poor decisions. My hall also put a lot of activities on to help us get to know each other. They also do a good welcome week during W1 where they have lots of stalls/tours/directions on campus to help you settle in and your class teachers and lecturers will introduce you to the course and talk you through the year. I actually found Freshers to be a lot of fun and nowhere as scary as I thought it would be, which was good as I can be pretty shy.

    Atmosphere: One thing that absolutely terrified me about LSE was its reputation for being really cold/unfriendly/business-orientated and I was really scared that I’d made the wrong decision before I came. In all honesty I’ll admit that the uni does take itself pretty seriously and most are very focused on getting a job/interning/work BUT I’ve found all of my teachers and lecturers to be really approachable and genuinely interested in how you’re doing and will make time for you to see them if you’ve got any questions. I think it depends who you surround yourself with; me and my friends from halls/my course/AU teams all have the attitude to not be competitive with one another at all, to have a good time and be friendly/positive but get our heads down and work when we need to, and I think that’s the best way to do it- a lot of the uni experience is dependent on you and the people you surround yourself with. I think LSE is trying to respond to that reputation and has launched a lot of pastoral programmes recently (LSE Life, mental health programmes, student panels) which is good. The uni definitely expects a lot of you and everyone is at the top of their game (you’re surrounded by people who are incredibly clever and so they obviously take their work seriously) and at the start I honestly didn’t think I was clever enough; one thing I’ll say about LSE is that it can feel a little competitive and there are some people that are desperate to show how much they know off. However, if you surround yourself with people with a good attitude or the type of outlook that you want to have then you’ll be fine.

    All in all I’m pretty happy with my decision and don’t think I’d have gone anywhere else. I’ve made a really lovely group of friends and I think once you crack how to balance the workload and social life (plus not spend too much money) it’s good, but a lot to take on at first. I do miss home at times but living in London and going to LSE especially gives you so many amazing opportunities, particularly if you want to do anything to do within the social sciences, and (most of) the lecturers/teachers you’re taught by are really knowledgeable and know what they’re talking about.
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    (Original post by lseqanda123)
    Hi everyone, sorry for the delay. Hopefully this will answer your questions and be of some use to you!

    Social Life: I find that your social life is what you make it. You live in London, one of the busiest cities in the world, and so there’s always a lot to do, and once you crack it you can always find things that are free/relatively affordable. There’s so many clubs and a lot of them offer student discounts. For me I’ve found it okay to fit time off from working around studying, but there’s obviously times when you need to prioritize studies. It’s very different to a typical night at home so we tend to mix between going to the bar/pub for a drink and then once a week we’ll try and have a proper night out. I’ve found that I’m not going on nights out as much as my friends at Leeds etc. but it’s really up to you.

    International Students: Certain international students definitely group up and isolate themselves a little. There’s a lot of international students at LSE, as you’d imagine, and in all honesty I do find there to be a divide between home and UK students at times. This of course isn’t the case for all students, and I’ve found lots are willing to mingle and be really social so it varies.

    Workload: I study government so my week-to-week work is usually just a load of reading/prep for lectures and classes with essays about every 4 weeks. I have 12 hours of contact time for my subject a week made up of a mix of lectures and classes. I do feel like I have more work than my friends at other unis and I do get stressed sometimes, but I don’t find it unmanageable (though there has been 2/3 all nighters since September which I don’t think is too bad). It's hard and the uni definitely pushes you, but I find that if I dedicate my free time during the day and plan ahead I’m usually okay, if a bit tired. Sometimes you just have to prioritize certain subjects over others and accept that it won’t be done in time (which as a bit of a control freak I found hard to do at first).

    Jobs: I have a Saturday job which is only 7 hours a week and I find it okay to balance work around that. Some of my friends here work about 20 hours a week but it’s quite rare to find people who work more than that. I imagine it would be quite hard to balance a lot of shifts and the workload, and the uni definitely discourages you from working more than 18 hours a week (not that they’d know if you did).

    Accommodation: TBH I don’t know a lot about the other halls, but the hall I live in (Bankside) is very social (the only LSE hall with a proper bar which is great for socializing and offers cheap drinks). I have a single room with a bathroom that I share with one other person and that’s £205 p.w. including one meal per day and it’s about a 20 minute walk from campus/similar length bus ride. Roseberry hall is also meant to be really social and is a lot more close-knit than Bankside because it’s relatively small (Bankside is 600+). My hall is also in a really good area, by the Tate Modern and Globe so it’s a lovely area to live. In all honesty I’ve not heard great things about the UoL intercollegiate halls, most people who I know that live there say they’re pretty dead and unsociable which isn’t the best considering most people make their friends in halls. The Urbanest buildings are amazing (Westminster’s views are so good) but pretty expensive and not very social too. You can apply for accommodation once you have firmed your offer and you choose five options from the list of halls/room types in preference order, and say what is most important for you to have. LSE then gets back to you within two weeks letting you know what hall and room type you’ll be in for September and you’ll then have to pay a deposit if you get in on results day of £250, if I remember correctly.

    Living Costs: Being from the North I definitely found moving to London hard to adjust to; it can be mega expensive and unfortunately things like nights out aren’t always very affordable due to having to pay for entry, drinks etc. (pre drinks are life). However, I’m pretty lucky as due to my family circumstances I get a decent maintenance loan and a bursary from LSE; the uni automatically considers from your student finance information whether you’re deserving of a bursary and there’s also a lot of scholarships you can apply to. Some friends have the minimum loan and it’s definitely tough but they just try to not spend on takeaway food/take public transport as much/try to drink in our cheaper bar as opposed to buying drinks when out. Once you find where the cheap places and best deals are you’ll survive, but it’s obviously harder than it would in a northern uni.

    Mature Students: Lots of mature students, especially in my hall!

    Freshers: LSE have their RAG events which is basically a week of nights out and daytime activities organised by the SU people. These are cheesy but most of them are decent and they’re a good way of meeting people/making friends/getting drunk and making poor decisions. My hall also put a lot of activities on to help us get to know each other. They also do a good welcome week during W1 where they have lots of stalls/tours/directions on campus to help you settle in and your class teachers and lecturers will introduce you to the course and talk you through the year. I actually found Freshers to be a lot of fun and nowhere as scary as I thought it would be, which was good as I can be pretty shy.

    Atmosphere: One thing that absolutely terrified me about LSE was its reputation for being really cold/unfriendly/business-orientated and I was really scared that I’d made the wrong decision before I came. In all honesty I’ll admit that the uni does take itself pretty seriously and most are very focused on getting a job/interning/work BUT I’ve found all of my teachers and lecturers to be really approachable and genuinely interested in how you’re doing and will make time for you to see them if you’ve got any questions. I think it depends who you surround yourself with; me and my friends from halls/my course/AU teams all have the attitude to not be competitive with one another at all, to have a good time and be friendly/positive but get our heads down and work when we need to, and I think that’s the best way to do it- a lot of the uni experience is dependent on you and the people you surround yourself with. I think LSE is trying to respond to that reputation and has launched a lot of pastoral programmes recently (LSE Life, mental health programmes, student panels) which is good. The uni definitely expects a lot of you and everyone is at the top of their game (you’re surrounded by people who are incredibly clever and so they obviously take their work seriously) and at the start I honestly didn’t think I was clever enough; one thing I’ll say about LSE is that it can feel a little competitive and there are some people that are desperate to show how much they know off. However, if you surround yourself with people with a good attitude or the type of outlook that you want to have then you’ll be fine.

    All in all I’m pretty happy with my decision and don’t think I’d have gone anywhere else. I’ve made a really lovely group of friends and I think once you crack how to balance the workload and social life (plus not spend too much money) it’s good, but a lot to take on at first. I do miss home at times but living in London and going to LSE especially gives you so many amazing opportunities, particularly if you want to do anything to do within the social sciences, and (most of) the lecturers/teachers you’re taught by are really knowledgeable and know what they’re talking about.
    Thank you so much, this answer has so much detail! It's really great that you're willing to help us prospective students so much? I have a few more questions:

    1) Did you also get an offer from UCL? If so what made you choose LSE over UCL?

    2) How are study abroad opportunities? Are there many, do many people take the opportunity, and how competitive are they to get onto? If having a year abroad (preferably in America or Asia) is pretty important to me am I better off going elsewhere?

    I've seen that LSE has a new undergraduate exchange with Berkeley which sounds amazing to me, but there's no indication on how competitive it is to get a place. Do you by any chance know how difficult it is to get a place?
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    Hi, thank you so much for this.

    I'm assuming you take GV100 and GV101 - how do you find them? What are the reading lists like, especially for political theory?

    What are your outside options and do you enjoy them?
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    UCL: I did consider UCL but never applied. I wasn't a fan of UCL's campus and accommodation and even though it's obviously an amazing uni, I just never really felt comfortable when I visited. Their politics course is also very highly specialized and at that point I wasn't sure I wanted to focus purely on European politics for four years. The course at LSE is more malleable. The other universities I had offers from were Durham, Liverpool, and Leeds and I had an interview for Cambridge but messed it up oh well

    Study Abroad: If a year abroad is really important to you and you want a lot of options about where to go then LSE isn't great to be honest. As far as I know the only two uni-wide options are Berkeley and Sciences Po, and these have very limited placements and high requirements (there's only 10 placements on the Berkeley . I have always wanted to do a year abroad and that was one reason why Leeds caught my eye (their Erasmus programme is amazing) but it's not something that LSE pushes a lot. However, there are lots of niche opportunities to go and intern in Asia, China etc. and the SU runs a lot of trips abroad.

    GV100 and GV101: I love GV101 and think it's really interesting. It's definitely different from a lot of other politics courses because there's a fair bit of data work/regression tables etc. which freaked me out at first because I stopped doing maths at 16. However, they introduce you to all of this within the first weeks of the course and it's fine and really manageable, even if you're the worst at maths (like me); it's not like you're doing sums every week. GV100 can be a bit hit and miss for me (not the biggest philosophy fan) but still good. On average for GV101 we'll have about 20/30 pages from the core textbook we use and maybe one or two journal articles to do, which sounds a lot but is pretty manageable per week. GV100 focuses on a different political thinker every week and so you'll have a few chapters/pages from a set text (usually my teacher will specify what chapters to focus on) and some class questions.

    Outside options: First year gov students can choose two outside options, as GV100 and GV101 are the only compulsory courses for this year. I'm doing a language at advanced level (studied it for GCSE and A-Level) and SO110: Power, Inequality and Difference, which is a sociology course. The language department is great but it's a lot of work every week and I would honestly say I spend more time doing work for that course than for anything else just because of the quantity of it, not even because of the difficulty. The language courses do tend to be smaller though, which means you get a more personalized way of teaching without any lectures; it's purely class-based, with 4 hours of classes a week. Sociology is good, and so far we've studied class for 4 weeks, race for 4 weeks and we've just started politics and conflict. The main problem I've had with this course is that a different lecturer teaches each block, and so I've preferred some lecture styles to others. Most other courses only get one outside module, though, and law students get none.
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    Thanks for your post.

    I'm choosing between firming a very nice offer of ABC for Bristol, and a more challenging offer of A*AB for LSE (to read Soc). Do you have any further comments about the physical layout of the LSE? I feel, when I came to the open day, I only saw a fraction of the buildings. Do you feel it lacks the campus feel of other institutions, despite having a localised group of buildings? If so, does this have a negative effect on your experience?

    Also, how do you find travelling to and from lectures? And lastly, what is it like sharing a room? I'm a boy and I've never had that kind of experience before so unsure as to whether i'd be okay with it... especially as I have a gf who would probably be staying for one night every fortnight when she's in the country. (I think i'd have to go home to see her instead... which isn't ideal.)

    Thanks in advance.
    J
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    Do you know anybody who stays at urbanet Westminster Bridge? What do they think about living there?
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    Thank you so much! It's so kind of you to answer our questions. I've been researching online and quite like the sound of Rosebery, Carr-Saunders, Passfield and Bankside, mainly because they're sociable! What are the main differences between the first three? Also, my worry with Bankside is that because it is so big, it's more isolating? (I heard the others I listed are pretty tight knit). My main criteria for accommodation is 1) sociable (I like going out, clubbing, am extroverted and want to be surrounded by others like that) and 2) affordable!

    Also, I'm probably going to end up sharing a room with someone. How does this process work? Do they get you to answer questions and match you up with someone similar or is it completely random? And I'm assuming roommates are male/male or female/female? Can't find confirmation online.

    Thanks!
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    Thank you for taking your time to answer these.

    1. Is there anything you would recomend to us to buy/prepare/learn of ahead of time in order to make our time at LSE easier?
    2. Is there a need to buy a bike?
    3. Is there an oportunity to include a language module into a course such as Economics, or is that not allowed?

    Thanks once again.
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    (Original post by swkr)
    Do you know anybody who stays at urbanet Westminster Bridge? What do they think about living there?
    I'm not OP, but I do know someone who stays at urbanest Westminster (and have stayed there myself for awhile). I'd consider the rooms above average and pretty good quality for uni accommodation - it was really nicely furnished. Good location too, within walking distance of the tube and bus stops. The only qualm I had with the place was the size of the single rooms which are kinda small and cramped, but you get that pretty much everywhere in London.
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    Hi everyone, glad I can help you! I've taken the last couple of questions and organised them into categories, hopefully I've answered your queries:

    Physical layout of campus: Firstly, congrats on both of those amazing offers! It's definitely not a traditional campus in the sense that it's in the middle of central London and has a bit of an odd layout. However, on a typical uni day I'd say it feels like any other university. It's a lot smaller than other campuses I visited when I was looking at universities, and I like that it's always busy and there's lots of people about/stalls outside the SU (also there's a man outside the SU everyday who will give you a huge portion of curry and bread for any sort of donation which LSE students take complete advantage of). I wouldn't say the layout of uni affects my experience and I actually like the campus- there's a lot of cool little spots where you can get amazing views across London and have a coffee.

    Travel: I walk to and from campus everyday as there's not really a direct bus/tube from Bankside to campus. It's actually a nice walk across Blackfriars and then down Victoria Embankment, definitely weird seeing the London Eye and Big Ben on your way to a lecture. Obviously there's great transport links but most people I know tend to walk, especially as the nearest tube line to campus that goes through Holborn is the central line, which can be super busy. A bike is a great idea! Cycling could be pretty scary though, considering campus is in central London.

    Accommodation: I actually don't share a room, but share a bathroom with my neighbour at Bankside. I don't know many who share an actual bedroom and personally I'm not sure how I'd feel about doing so, as it's nice to have your own personal space. One good thing, however, about sharing a room in Bankside is that they're *huge*. Also, boys and girls never share rooms/bathrooms, you're always with someone of the same sex (at Bankside anyway), and in terms of pairing up people of the same nationalities, I don't think that is the case. I know people at Roseberry and Passfield that love it as it's really close-knit and sociable. I wanted an en-suite/bathroom shared with minimal people which, along with the location and bar, swayed me to Bankside. It is pretty huge and I do get how you could be isolated as it's not a traditional flat-style hall layout but more of a hotel-style with four kitchens on each floor which anyone can access. However, there's lots of events at the start of term to encourage socializing and the bar is great for mixing and meeting people (and is very cheap, the most important thing). If you like being sociable, Bankside is great and 15 minutes walk from Ministry of Sound and right next to lots of bars/restaurants/pubs, and has one of the lowest rents of the LSE halls when you factor in having one meal per day plus your own bathroom/bathroom shared with one person.

    Uni Prep: This is a bit of a tough one as the courses/teachers next year won't necessarily be the same and so anything like required reading can change. What I would say is visit the LSE course guide and read up there (http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calen...s/graduate.htm) as teachers will often put on recommended readings. Speaking from experience, if you're going to study government there's not a lot you can do for GV101, but for GV100 look into any sort of political philosophy (Locke, Rousseau, Machiavelli, Marx etc.). Also just try and immerse yourself in your subject and keep an eye out for any events that LSE is holding over the summer that you could possibly attend.

    Languages: Anybody who gets to choose an outside module as part of their course can study a language after taking an aptitude test. This doesn't mean you'll be refused a place on a language course, the department simply does it to set you and put you in the class that best reflects your ability. I'm not sure if first year econ students get an outside module, but if you do, then you're free to study a language if you wish. Even if you don't get an outside module, however, a lot of departments are looking to increase the amount of students on their courses studying languages, and so you can apply for a department bursary to study languages as part of an extra-curricular course (the bursary covers the cost of these classes).

    Hope you all had a good weekend and please don't hesitate to ask any more questions!
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    If I apply to LSE with A*AA in Economics, Maths, Business Studies and an A in AS Further Maths, will my application be considered competitive?
    I am applying for BSc Accounting & Finance and I have strong extracurriculars.
    Another alternative is Economics, Pure Maths, Business Studies with A*A*A?
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    Hi there, nice to see this thread being woken up again!Those offers are MORE than competitive enough for LSE, whatever combination you go for. I know people who did a wide mix of subjects at A-Level so study what you enjoy most. Just remember though that loads of people get great grades (and the entry requirements are usually only AAA) and that LSE does let people in with A*AB/AAB, so it's all about having a passionate, unique personal statement. LSE is very specialised so showing that you're into that will be impressive.
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    I liked LSE when I visited and I liked the course, but I heard teachers don't care about undergrads is this true??? (I am applying, and the library looked amazing )
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    I liked LSE when I visited and I liked the course, but I heard teachers don't care about undergrads is this true??? (I am applying, and the library looked amazing )
    The thing about teachers is that they're usually PHD students, so their main priority is gonna be their research. HOWEVER, every teacher I've had has been very supportive and more than willing to give up their time to help you out. They're usually super busy so can be slow replying to emails etc., and of course there are some bad ones, but I wouldn't say it differs from any uni. Also, the library looks good but is a nightmare when it gets to exam season, getting full up from 6AM onwards... not a fan
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    (Original post by lseqanda123)
    Hi there, nice to see this thread being woken up again!Those offers are MORE than competitive enough for LSE, whatever combination you go for. I know people who did a wide mix of subjects at A-Level so study what you enjoy most. Just remember though that loads of people get great grades (and the entry requirements are usually only AAA) and that LSE does let people in with A*AB/AAB, so it's all about having a passionate, unique personal statement. LSE is very specialised so showing that you're into that will be impressive.
    Thank you so much, honestly. People on other threads have been so negative and I guess I was reconsidering applying. But thank you so much! I really hope I clear the first round of application process. :P
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    (Original post by keepyourapology)
    Thank you so much, honestly. People on other threads have been so negative and I guess I was reconsidering applying. But thank you so much! I really hope I clear the first round of application process. :P
    I hope you pass it too! I'm sure you'll be more than fine. Very competitive but if you're passionate enough you have every chance. Any more questions, just ask
 
 
 
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