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Wanting to do A Level maths with C at gcse? Watch

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    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
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    (Original post by randomteenx)
    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
    My honest, brutal advice would be to not do it, if you're getting a C by revising hard. People with an A* grade got a D in AS maths in my year - people with Cs dropped it in the first week or two.

    I'd recommended getting an A to do AS maths
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    That will be extreeeemeeeely difficult. I suggest your friend finds another course/university that does not require A-level mathematics. A-level maths courses always ask for at least C or B (or even A) in GCSE maths anyway.

    My friend got A in GCSE maths and E in AS maths. I myself was a few marks off a B and would not have even considered trying A-level maths since I would have failed.

    That being said, with hard work, it is possible (there is about a 0.01% chance or so), but it may require more time and effort than it is worth.
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    (Original post by randomteenx)
    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
    What course? And that is complete BS- if you got a B at GCSE it doesn't mean you'll fail! I got an A at GCSE, but with minimal work. A level maths is a WHOLE different ball game! If you work hard you can definitely get As and A*s at a level! I got an A at GCSE, but I am current;y working at an A in AS maths! GCSE's are extremely different when it comes to the same subject at a level... tbh you can't really compare...

    Having said that, I thought you needed at least a B at GCSE to do AS maths, and an A to do AS FM? It's like that at my college (and other colleges near me) anyway...
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    (Original post by randomteenx)
    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
    Yeh in terms of my specific Alevel class I know of a few peoples results
    Gcse -A* Alevel-A
    Gcse-A Alevel- A X3
    Gcse-A Alevel- C X2
    Gcse A* Alevel - C
    Gcse-B Alevel - Dropped after AS due to getting D's/ E's X4

    So as you can see this does suggest you're likely to do better if you have a higher gcse grade but bare in mind the fact that someone with an a* at gcse didn't end up with a high grade
    Bare in mind that most schools don't let people with a C at gcse do Alevel maths
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    (Original post by randomteenx)
    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
    To be honest someone I knew got a B at GCSE then ended up getting an A at the end of A2. It all matters on how much work you put in. Then again, I'm not even sure if schools would take you to do A-Level Maths with a C grade.
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    lol

    ignore what everyone else says

    do what u want

    its your life NOT theres
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    That sounds like a terrible idea
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    from my own experience I got a B at GCSE quite easily but had to drop A level math after a month. You would end up neglecting your other subjects or overworking yourself. My advice would be to pick something you know you will do well in.
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    (Original post by randomteenx)
    This isn't about me personally but what advice would you give to someone wanting to do A Level maths (due to it being required for the uni course they want to do) but is struggling to achieve a C at gcse? (Predicted a 5, got a 4 in the mocks)

    Because from what I heard, most people who got a B in gcse end up failing maths a level?
    I'm not familiar with the new 9-1 GCSEs, but I do remember a C grade being set at around 25% raw marks when I took my exam; this means there is quite a lot of important knowledge that isn't understood or maybe there is another reason. If you practise a lot and go over weak areas you can get your GCSE grade up and do well at A level. For A level, algebra is very important. I'd say, yes choose A level maths if you are willing to put in the work needed.

    This is quite old, but for students who achieved grade C in GCSE maths, at A level the results were
    A* - 1%
    A - 4%
    B - 10%
    C - 21%
    D - 27%
    E - 24%
    U -12%

    The last bit is not true, the majority of people who get a B at GCSE pass A level maths.
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    I got a B in my GCSE maths and I'm now taking as-level.
    I've scored higher in my mocks than several students with As and A*s in both mechanics AND core.

    If you want it, you can do it. Past papers are key. Just keep doing them - aim for at least one a week, do more if possible. There's no other way. The more work you put in, the better. Don't place so much belief on what grade you get, it's your ethos and determination that will really count.

    EDIT: It's worth noting that I found mechanics (particularly the SUVAT side of it) much easier than core. The pulleys, not so much - but I haven't done many questions on them yet. C1 isn't bad at all, it's basically extended GCSE maths with a couple of new concepts. We're at integration and definite integration in C2 right now, and that's nice and easy to find the area under a graph.

    Take maths and find out yourself! There's no harm in taking it for a week or so to see what it's like and making a decision after that.
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    I would try and retake the gcse.
    I achieved a c on the lower paper at school. I went to college to take maths after the 6th form maths teacher refused me a place.
    I failed at the a level as there was a lot of the basics i was missing.
    I have since resat my gcse and achieved an a* after a lot of hard work.
    I'm currently redoing a level maths and finding it a lot easier.
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    If i'm understanding this correct, then the context is that you are currently doing GCSEs, you haven't received a C as your official mark (which is what the title would lead people to believe) although it's possible you think you'll end up getting a C?

    In this case, I don't see a problem doing A-level maths. You have plenty of time to improve!

    If this is any reassurance, then I received a C for my GCSE mocks and I came out with an A* at the end, so it is possible, although I had to work my ass off.

    Getting an A* doesn't mean much at GCSE though if you don't continue the hard work for A-levels.
    I received a U in my AS despite my A*. I know of friends who got A/B at GCSE and they annihilated me and got an A at AS and an A/A* at A-Level.

    It genuinely is all about perseverance, how committed you are to doing well and how much time you are willing to invest in understanding your subjects.

    Even if you do get a C at GCSE, even though initially you may find it a struggle at AS as it does build on topics in GCSE, if you persevere then it shouldn't be a problem.

    If Maths is really what you need for your ambitions in life then you can use that as motivation to succeed and hopefully this alone should provide you with the driving force you need to be able to do well. I say go for it if it's what you want!

    Best of luck : )
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    OMG HELL NOOOOO
    hahah I got an A in my IGCSE and currently in year 13 Maths A-level.
    I can kill myself like it too difficult. In my school we could only choose A-level maths if we got an A or A* in GCSE. I thought it was non-sense but I now get why. Maths is soooo complicated, nothing like in year 11. He or she should really consider the fact of studying more for the GCSE this year. Good luck
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    It would be very difficult. If you can't grasp GCSE topics well enough to get above a C, you're unlikely to get a good grade at A Level.
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    If you're not doing the higher paper at gcse level then you miss out a lot of the underlying information, so you'll have a lot more to catch up on.
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    ask the uni if core maths is acceptable?
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    (Original post by cdg964103886)
    OMG HELL NOOOOO
    hahah I got an A in my IGCSE and currently in year 13 Maths A-level.
    I can kill myself like it too difficult. In my school we could only choose A-level maths if we got an A or A* in GCSE. I thought it was non-sense but I now get why. Maths is soooo complicated, nothing like in year 11. He or she should really consider the fact of studying more for the GCSE this year. Good luck
    are ou talking about further maths? nothing to the scale your talking about comes around in normal maths unless its M2 i guess.
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    i say this with A* at gcse, C1 is a breeze (but im prone to daft mistakes) C2 which is done in the same, first year...is a lot harder than C1, like wayyyy difficult than what i had expected. and well...mechanics is a pain as well.

    it's really rewarding though, i like it... but like my maths teacher say - people with C and Bs lack the maths basic mentality as those with A/A*, because there's no time to count and take 2 minutes to multiply, that should have clicked ages ago, preparing u for actual concepts that ideally should take 2 minutes to answer.
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    Sorry to say but its just not a good idea if you haven't achieved atleast an A at GCSE. You'd end up dropping it or achieving low marks.
 
 
 
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