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    I was wondering about going into IB and I understand that to get into the top tier you most likely need to go to Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial/Warwick. But to get into more second tier investment banks such as UBS/Wells Fargo/Credit Suisse will you have a good chance if you go to unis such as Bristol/Notts/Manchester?
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    (Original post by 09812dsd)
    I was wondering about going into IB and I understand that to get into the top tier you most likely need to go to Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial/Warwick. But to get into more second tier investment banks such as UBS/Wells Fargo/Credit Suisse will you have a good chance if you go to unis such as Bristol/Notts/Manchester?
    lol @ UBS and CS being 'lower tier', great banter that. keep it up bro.

    industry is competitive throughout the BBs, EBs, balance sheet banks and MM firms.. doesn't matter where you apply, most people will be applying there as well. don't see what you're trying to find by asking if coming from a semi-target university will make life easier at these supposed "lower tier" banks.. it doesn't really work that way. some banks (of varying types) will heavily recruit from those unis and some won't but people still end up at the either based on their personal profile and interviewing technique.

    it's really not that deep, choose a good enough uni based on your own preferences and aim for as many banks or firms that you could see yourself working in in the future when applying to schemes. there's no gaming of any system going on here. your chances are pretty damn individualistic even after you factor in the whole target/semi/non-target stuff - there are some non targets who kick ass and there are target kids who get nothing.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    lol @ UBS and CS being 'lower tier', great banter that. keep it up bro.

    industry is competitive throughout the BBs, EBs, balance sheet banks and MM firms.. doesn't matter where you apply, most people will be applying there as well. don't see what you're trying to find by asking if coming from a semi-target university will make life easier at these supposed "lower tier" banks.. it doesn't really work that way. some banks (of varying types) will heavily recruit from those unis and some won't but people still end up at the either based on their personal profile and interviewing technique.

    it's really not that deep, choose a good enough uni based on your own preferences and aim for as many banks or firms that you could see yourself working in in the future when applying to schemes. there's no gaming of any system going on here. your chances are pretty damn individualistic even after you factor in the whole target/semi/non-target stuff - there are some non targets who kick ass and there are target kids who get nothing.

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    Thanks for your reply, I was only saying they are lower tier from what websites have told me.
    When looking at the % behind what grads the top IB's take in such as JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs it shows that the highest intake is from LSE then Oxford then Imperial. Also on the lists for their 2016 intake there was literally none from semi-targets uni's.
    So I was wondering as more of the Oxford/LSE/Imperial will be taken up by JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sach, when you work your way down to the lower banks will it be much easier getting into them coming from the semi-target unis.
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    (Original post by 09812dsd)
    Thanks for your reply, I was only saying they are lower tier from what websites have told me.
    When looking at the % behind what grads the top IB's take in such as JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs it shows that the highest intake is from LSE then Oxford then Imperial. Also on the lists for their 2016 intake there was literally none from semi-targets uni's.
    So I was wondering as more of the Oxford/LSE/Imperial will be taken up by JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sach, when you work your way down to the lower banks will it be much easier getting into them coming from the semi-target unis.
    still don't see the point in your analysis tbh, different firms target different universities. 'semi-target' is just a broad term for a university where not every bank specifically target, but anywhere from some to a quite a lot do and one that sends less (but still a noticeable number) into banking than a 'target'.

    it's not about chances or anything, and a list of unis represented doesn't tell you much about which ones are targeted by a firm.

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