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    Do you have to be extremely smart? Is it very competitive? If i graduated with a law degree from a good university would i find it really difficult to find a job?

    If it helps my a levels are philosophy, history and government and politics.I am thinking of changing G&P to economics, would this make a difference?
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    (Original post by LJones191)
    Do you have to be extremely smart? Is it very competitive? If i graduated with a law degree from a good university would i find it really difficult to find a job?

    If it helps my a levels are philosophy, history and government and politics.I am thinking of changing G&P to economics, would this make a difference?
    Getting a degree (and LPC) is pretty easy. Training contracts = kinda competitive but you don't have to be a genius, it's not extremely difficult to get one.
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    (Original post by LJones191)
    Do you have to be extremely smart? Is it very competitive? If i graduated with a law degree from a good university would i find it really difficult to find a job?

    If it helps my a levels are philosophy, history and government and politics.I am thinking of changing G&P to economics, would this make a difference?
    Not any more difficult than a lot of other professional careers. In fact it will be harder to get into certain other careers.


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    To be fair, as careers go it's a pretty tough one to crack. Lots of competition out there, far more law graduates than training contracts.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    To be fair, as careers go it's a pretty tough one to crack. Lots of competition out there, far more law graduates than training contracts.
    :ditto:
    Very true, but that's the same with all (graduate) careers to be honest.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    :ditto:
    Very true, but that's the same with all (graduate) careers to be honest.
    Good point - no grad job is easy.

    However there's 20k law graduates per year. I don't know how many training contracts there are, but it can't be anywhere remotely close to that number.

    Conversely if you looked at accountancy, there's 10k graduates per year. Four firms alone hire almost 5k accountants every year (although to be fair, many of the people they hire didn't study the subject at uni). Still, if you're playing a numbers game, it's got to be an easier career to break in to. (note I say easier, not better)

    Then again, there's also 20k psychology grads a year and probably about 10 jobs in that field, so could be worse odds
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    (Original post by M1011)
    To be fair, as careers go it's a pretty tough one to crack. Lots of competition out there, far more law graduates than training contracts.
    not just law grads, factor in the non-law grads too and it gets a bit wild.

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    (Original post by M1011)
    Good point - no grad job is easy.

    However there's 20k law graduates per year. I don't know how many training contracts there are, but it can't be anywhere remotely close to that number.

    Conversely if you looked at accountancy, there's 10k graduates per year. Four firms alone hire almost 5k accountants every year (although to be fair, many of the people they hire didn't study the subject at uni). Still, if you're playing a numbers game, it's got to be an easier career to break in to. (note I say easier, not better)

    Then again, there's also 20k psychology grads a year and probably about 10 jobs in that field, so could be worse odds
    This is why graduates shouldn't just be looking into their fields; they need to be more open about what they want to do.
    I understand that this may not be the case - spent 3 years studying something then realise it was all for nothing.
    In my experience as you can see from my signature I studied something similar to Psychology but a piece of paper didn't stop me from getting a job; my experience, determination, positive work attitude and good work ethic did all of that for me.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Good point - no grad job is easy.

    However there's 20k law graduates per year. I don't know how many training contracts there are, but it can't be anywhere remotely close to that number.

    Conversely if you looked at accountancy, there's 10k graduates per year. Four firms alone hire almost 5k accountants every year (although to be fair, many of the people they hire didn't study the subject at uni). Still, if you're playing a numbers game, it's got to be an easier career to break in to. (note I say easier, not better)

    Then again, there's also 20k psychology grads a year and probably about 10 jobs in that field, so could be worse odds
    most*

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    (Original post by LJones191)
    Do you have to be extremely smart? Is it very competitive? If i graduated with a law degree from a good university would i find it really difficult to find a job?

    If it helps my a levels are philosophy, history and government and politics.I am thinking of changing G&P to economics, would this make a difference?
    Although an excellent grade may be important for the first sep, but so is experience too.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    most*

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    What % would you say is "most"?

    51%?
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    (Original post by M1011)
    Good point - no grad job is easy.

    However there's 20k law graduates per year. I don't know how many training contracts there are, but it can't be anywhere remotely close to that number.

    Conversely if you looked at accountancy, there's 10k graduates per year. Four firms alone hire almost 5k accountants every year (although to be fair, many of the people they hire didn't study the subject at uni). Still, if you're playing a numbers game, it's got to be an easier career to break in to. (note I say easier, not better)

    Then again, there's also 20k psychology grads a year and probably about 10 jobs in that field, so could be worse odds
    There's about 5500 training contracts a year. You then have to also factor in how many people go into paralegal roles and the bar though. That could easily be that same number again.

    However a significant proportion of law students won't choose to pursue a career in law. Many go into finance and civil service roles instead, as well as many other different professions. Law is not like medicine where pretty much every graduate ends up going into the profession they studied.


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    (Original post by M1011)
    What % would you say is "most"?

    51%?
    Probably closer to 80+ % given my experience. That's for the bigger firms with very large intakes and who support individuals through ACA/ACCA/ATT training though.

    Local accountancy firms tend to be much stricter and will tend to want people who have an A&F degree, and potentially even those who are partly Qualified.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Probably closer to 80+ % given my experience. That's for the bigger firms with very large intakes and who support individuals through ACA/ACCA/ATT training though.

    Local accountancy firms tend to be much stricter and will tend to want people who have an A&F degree, and potentially even those who are partly Qualified.


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    I don't think 80% of my big 4 intake were from unrelated degrees. Maybe 60%?

    But then I guess different departments, different years etc.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    I don't think 80% of my big 4 intake were from unrelated degrees. Maybe 60%?

    But then I guess different departments, different years etc.
    I factored in the non accountancy departments (advisory/consulting), probably closer to what you said if you looked at the accountancy roles though.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I factored in the non accountancy departments (advisory/consulting), probably closer to what you said if you looked at the accountancy roles though.


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    Good point
 
 
 
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